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TejasHorn
Texas Fan
High Plains Driftin'
Member since Mar 2007
7132 posts

The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Rock music isn't dead, but it's barely hanging on. This is true in at least two senses. Though popular music sales in general have plummeted since their peak around the turn of the millennium, certain genres continue to generate commercial excitement: pop, rap, hip-hop, country. But rock — amplified and often distorted electric guitars, bass, drums, melodic if frequently abrasive lead vocals, with songs usually penned exclusively by the members of the band — barely registers on the charts.

There are still important rock musicians making music in a range of styles — Canada's Big Wreck excels at sophisticated progressive hard rock, for example, while the more subdued American band Dawes artfully expands on the soulful songwriting that thrived in California during the 1970s. But these groups often toil in relative obscurity, selling a few thousand records at a time, performing to modest-sized crowds in clubs and theaters.


quote:

But there's another sense in which rock is very nearly dead: Just about every rock legend you can think of is going to die within the next decade or so.


quote:

Bob Dylan (78 years old); Paul McCartney (77); Paul Simon (77) and Art Garfunkel (77); Carole King (77); Brian Wilson (77); Mick Jagger (76) and Keith Richards (75); Joni Mitchell (75); Jimmy Page (75) and Robert Plant (71); Ray Davies (75); Roger Daltrey (75) and Pete Townshend (74); Roger Waters (75) and David Gilmour (73); Rod Stewart (74); Eric Clapton (74); Debbie Harry (74); Neil Young (73); Van Morrison (73); Bryan Ferry (73); Elton John (72); Don Henley (72); James Taylor (71); Jackson Browne (70); Billy Joel (70); and Bruce Springsteen (69, but turning 70 next month).


LINK


Hu_Flung_Pu
USA Fan
Central, LA
Member since Jan 2013
18671 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Isn't the new tool and Slipknot album trending and doing extremely well?


genuineLSUtiger
LSU Fan
Murfreesboro
Member since Sep 2005
55392 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Kids today have no clue what they missed


Hu_Flung_Pu
USA Fan
Central, LA
Member since Jan 2013
18671 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
All the older stuff listed is categorized close to pop now.


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11
NewIberiaHaircut
LSU Fan
Lafayette
Member since May 2013
8824 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

certain genres continue to generate commercial excitement: pop, rap, hip-hop, country


These are the genres pushed by modern-day radio. Rock is ignored and it's on purpose. "They" don't want more rebellious white people!


Brosef Stalin
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2011
30712 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Isn't the new tool and Slipknot album trending and doing extremely well?

They both debuted at number one. Tool knocked off the new Taylor Swift album. Aenima was number 10 on the Billboard charts a few weeks ago.


quote:

There are still important rock musicians making music in a range of styles — Canada's Big Wreck excels at sophisticated progressive hard rock, for example, while the more subdued American band Dawes artfully expands on the soulful songwriting that thrived in California during the 1970s. But these groups often toil in relative obscurity, selling a few thousand records at a time, performing to modest-sized crowds in clubs and theaters.

The rock festival scene is stronger than ever. There's 50,000+ capacity festivals selling out all over the country. As for individual acts, check out the crowds Metallica, GNR, U2, Tool, and Slipknot are drawing. Even Slayer is drawing is drawing 10-20,000 on their farewell tour.


quote:

Just about every rock legend you can think of is going to die within the next decade or so. quote: Bob Dylan (78 years old); Paul McCartney (77); Paul Simon (77) and Art Garfunkel (77); Carole King (77); Brian Wilson (77); Mick Jagger (76) and Keith Richards (75); Joni Mitchell (75); Jimmy Page (75) and Robert Plant (71); Ray Davies (75); Roger Daltrey (75) and Pete Townshend (74); Roger Waters (75) and David Gilmour (73); Rod Stewart (74); Eric Clapton (74); Debbie Harry (74); Neil Young (73); Van Morrison (73); Bryan Ferry (73); Elton John (72); Don Henley (72); James Taylor (71); Jackson Browne (70); Billy Joel (70); and Bruce Springsteen (69, but turning 70 next month).

None of these people are relevant to anyone under 50. I know its hard to imagine, but new rock stars have been made since the 70s.
This post was edited on 9/4 at 6:33 pm


AUjim
Auburn Fan
America
Member since Dec 2012
2520 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
If rock is dead then so is country and every other blurred genre...

Fu k this generic, superficial society.

Tool, whiskey myers, sturgill simpson, the raconteurs....all ‘rock’ albums released or releasing in 2019 that by all accounts/expectations will be very good


Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99869 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Rock Music Is on Life Support. Is Hollywood Next?

An essay inspired by the article in the OP
quote:

Jazz died off as a mass genre for two reasons. First, as Mark Gauvreau Judge wrote in his fun 2000 book, If It Ain’t Got That Swing, postwar economics and the rise of bebop as a counterforce in jazz greatly killed off the big bands of the 1930s and ‘40s, but the complexities of bop led many teenagers in the 1950s to seek out rock and roll as a simpler music style to dance along with. Capitol Records putting the full force of their PR team behind The Beatles when they arrived in America in early 1964 cemented rock and roll as the dominant musical genre for teenage whites, as Nat “King” Cole, who helped make Capitol a dominant force in America in the 1950s, discovered to his horror when he called their flagship Los Angeles office that year and the receptionist answered “Capitol Records – home of The Beatles!” (My dad shared his pain, as reflected in the very few new titles in his record collection after 1964.)

However, by the beginning of the 21st century, rock’s dominance was already on the wane when first Napster and then Apple’s iTunes radically altered how consumers access music. MTV, which gave rock a new lease on life after music industry fears in the early ‘80s that video games would replace their product as teens’ primary consumer spending good, was itself a spent force by the mid-to-late 1990s.

Hence, the nostalgia that many rock fans feel, with little or no new product that’s equal to the material produced during rock and roll’s heyday.


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11
wareaglepete
Auburn Fan
Sugar Bear
Member since Dec 2012
2960 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
I agree with the article. You can point to successful tours and festivals, but most of these are long established acts from 20 or more years ago.

The cause? That is complicated. The changing musical taste of the youth is a big reason. That is what drives popular music. Pro Tools and programs like it are a big cause IMO. They are great and allow a lot of people to make music, but they make it an 'easy' way out. Sure, why should you have to double a guitar part when you can just edit it in the computer? But, something is lost in this process.

I know I will get hit with all these great young rock acts and the usual response that rock is alive and well, "you just have to look for it". Well, that is the problem. If it was great and abundant, it would be appealing to a much larger audience. Personally, I just don't hear anything new and cutting edge in rock. Sounds uninspired and playing on what has already be done. Technology and instrument innovation is an issue as well. There are not any real new sounds. In the 60's you had the electric bass changing the sound of rock, and other, music. In the 70's advances in amplification and effects brought new sound and continued through the 90's. In the 70's and 80's you had keyboards and synths bringing a new sound. What is new now?

Now get off my lawn.


dawgfan24348
Georgia Fan
Cumming, Georgia
Member since Oct 2011
35003 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

None of these people are relevant to anyone under 50. I know its hard to imagine, but new rock stars have been made since the 70s.

Rock isn't dying it's just that older people are bitching because their favorite bands are no longer as relevant as today. The rock scene is still pretty big and there are plenty of new bands being discovered all the time


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412
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ShamelessPel
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Metairie
Member since Apr 2013
12077 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Isn't the new tool and Slipknot album trending and doing extremely well?




Those bands were formed 30 and 25 years ago respectively. That's kind of the point. All of your headline quality rock acts are 20+ years old or flash-in-the-pan softer indie rock like Mumford and Sons.


kingbob
LSU Fan
Sorrento, LA
Member since Nov 2010
49466 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Those bands were formed 30 and 25 years ago respectively. That's kind of the point. All of your headline quality rock acts are 20+ years old or flash-in-the-pan softer indie rock like Mumford and Sons.


This. It can’t be more obvious from listening to Alt 92.3:
Outside of the recycled 90’s grunge acts and 2000’s pop punk and emo bands like Panic and Fallout Boy, everything from the last 10 years just sounds like cold play or watered down trap music...with one exception. However, that band is the laughing stock of music according to this board and nothing but a trumped up tribute band. In the mean time, they’re damn near the only rock band founded in the last 5 years achieving mainstream success and terrestrial radio support while actually sounding like rock music.

Granted, all this talk of rock being in decline is just temporary until I drop my new album early next year. Y’all don’t even know!
This post was edited on 9/5 at 10:03 am


Brosef Stalin
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2011
30712 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

All of your headline quality rock acts are 20+ years old or flash-in-the-pan softer indie rock like Mumford and Sons.

I think you're the only BMTH fan on here so you know they're big right now. GVF and Ghost are both about to start arena headline tours. BMTH isn't far behind them. Rock acts tend to have more longevity than rap or pop. Tool, Slipknot, Disturbed, etc can all tour for another 15-20 years if they want and still draw huge crowds.

You still have more radio friendly bands like Shinedown and Nickleback that are big and older bands like Pearl Jam and RHCP that don't tour much any more but draw huge crowds when they do play. Foo Fighters are one of the biggest bands out there and still tour regularly and draw extremely well.
This post was edited on 9/5 at 10:29 am


Ace Midnight
LSU Fan
Between sanity and madness
Member since Dec 2006
69016 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Most of the hair metal guys from the 80s are in their 60s or walking up on 60 really quickly (e.g. Jon Bon Jovi is 57, Stephen Pearcy and Blackie Lawless are 63, Don Dokken is 66, etc.).

The 90s folks (those still living, anyway) are generally mid-50s. RHCP except Josh are mid-50s. Vedder is 55. Cantrell is 53. Grohl is 50.



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RogerTheShrubber
LSU Fan
Juneau, AK
Member since Jan 2009
176381 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:


Fu k this generic, superficial society.


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41
Damone
Colorado State Fan
FoCo
Member since Aug 2016
18064 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Lots of great stuff to come this year. New material from Kody San Pedro and Austin Mead that will crush.


MondayMorningMarch
LSU Fan
Pumping Sunshine. She's cute!
Member since Dec 2006
14039 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Rock is dead they say
Long live rock!

I'm calling BS on this thread. Gimme three chords, a cloud of dust, a pool of sweat, a Telecaster and a bottle of whiskey any day.


Hu_Flung_Pu
USA Fan
Central, LA
Member since Jan 2013
18671 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
I never heard of Meade so I looked up a song. Almost threw up.


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99869 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Long live rock!

I'm calling BS on this thread. Gimme three chords, a cloud of dust, a pool of sweat, a Telecaster and a bottle of whiskey any day.
too bad the target demo doesn't agree with you


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10
MontanaMax
Ole Miss Fan
Oxford, MS
Member since Nov 2011
1794 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
I saw a pic yesterday of guy fieri being taken to flavor town at a nickleback concert. Rock can’t be dead.


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