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The Seaward
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jan 2006
9478 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Honestly between stuff like PUP and Jeff Rosenstock I think punk at least is very much alive


Can’t wait for a new Jeff Rosenstock album. Worry is a top 10 record this decade for me. This year’s PUP was great too. I find there is interesting guitar based music being released almost every week.


Harry Caray
Houston Astros Fan
Denial
Member since Aug 2009
17293 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
I don't think I've listened to any album more than I did Morbid Stuff the three months after its release and still often today. Helps that it's like 35 minutes but man every song is so good.

And very good Worry take definitely my favorite of his

Antarctigo Vespucci released an album last October too if you need more Rosenstock, granted he isn't on vocals


The Seaward
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jan 2006
9478 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Antarctigo Vespucci released an album last October too if you need more Rosenstock, granted he isn't on vocals


I enjoyed the hell out of that one too. Freakin U Out was in the running for my track of the year.


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11
GatorPA84
Florida Fan
Florida
Member since Sep 2016
456 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Say all you want I’m still going to see as I lay dying this year!!! Rock on!!!


ShamelessPel
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Metairie
Member since Apr 2013
12076 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Oh there are some really fun rock bands out there, but they won’t be headlining anywhere likely ever. It’s not that there isn’t any good music out there. It’s that very few are mainstream accessible and even those few have a hard time sustaining success. AWOLNATION’s Megalithic Symphony album was fricking great. Sail was a MASSIVE hit on pop and rock stations. They were signed by Red Bull so they had a great platform (X-Games etc) for their not-as-good 2nd album release and started inching up on that “right below headliner” spot, but they just fell off. Foster the People was a similar story except they fell off quicker without the platform for their not-as-good follow up to Torches.

I listen to Sirius Xm Octane all the time and the host said something along the lines of “people that say rock is dead haven’t heard this new song from Skillet”. I’ve never been embarrassed for Octane before even with some of the god awful songs I’ve heard, but I was just thinking “god rock is dead” hearing that line from the host.


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30
Htowntiger90
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Dec 2018
283 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
You could argue it both ways, but we are in the passing of an era for sure. Metallica & the Stones are still bringing it with big crowds, but who will carry the mantle going forward? Tool, Jack White & the Black Keys? And the Keys have gone away from their gritty rock sound, trying to get it back a little with the new album.

We've been lucky to listen to a generation of bands & musicians who played & sang like noone had before. Hendrix, Clapton, Jimmy Page, Robert Plant, Ozzy, Geddy Lee, Neil Peart, Duane Allman, Waters & Gilmour. To paraphrase Rick Pitino - "Those guys aren't walking through the door anytime soon."

I'll always listen to Bach, Beethoven, Mozart, and they've been gone a couple of centuries. I'll always listen to Rush, Zep, Metallica & Floyd. Will someone else come along? Hope springs eternal. I'm a seeker!


HeadyBrosevelt
Hawaii Fan
the Verde River
Member since Jan 2013
21524 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard.


monsterballads
Washington State Fan
Make LSU Great Again
Member since Jun 2013
23683 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses


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11
Undertow
USA Fan
Member since Sep 2016
3338 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

certain genres continue to generate commercial excitement: pop, rap, hip-hop, country


And I think all of these are forms of pop music today. Simple, superficial, catchy beats and melodies lacking any depth...just dressed up a little differently.


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10
TegrityFarms
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2019
45 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

You can't kill the metal
The metal will live on
Punk-Rock tried to kill the metal
But they failed, as they were smite to the ground New-wave tried to kill the metal
But they failed, as they were stricken down to the ground

Grunge tried to kill the metal Ha,hahahahaha They failed, as they were thrown to the ground

No-one can destroy the metal
The metal will strike you down with a vicious blow We are the vanquished foes of the metal
We tried to win for why we do not know

New-wave tried to destroy the metal, but the metal had its way

Grunge then tried to dethrone the metal, but metal was in the way

Punk-rock tried to destroy the metal, but metal was much too strong

Techno tried to defile the metal, but techno was proven wrong

Yea! Metal!

It comes from hell!


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Htowntiger90
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Dec 2018
283 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses


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10
Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99823 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
It was in fact heavy metal that killed rock & roll
quote:

You can't kill the metal
The metal will live on
Punk-Rock tried to kill the metal
But they failed, as they were smite to the ground New-wave tried to kill the metal
But they failed, as they were stricken down to the ground

Grunge tried to kill the metal Ha,hahahahaha They failed, as they were thrown to the ground

No-one can destroy the metal
The metal will strike you down with a vicious blow We are the vanquished foes of the metal
We tried to win for why we do not know

New-wave tried to destroy the metal, but the metal had its way

Grunge then tried to dethrone the metal, but metal was in the way

Punk-rock tried to destroy the metal, but metal was much too strong

Techno tried to defile the metal, but techno was proven wrong

Yea! Metal!

It comes from hell!


Tackle74
Missouri Fan
Rogers, AR
Member since Mar 2012
4185 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
Funny many of those bands listed as carrying the Rock banner are actually Heavy Metal. Metal may wain in popularity but it is resilient as hell. Funny there are many great metal acts out there right now Gojira, Baroness, Devin townsend, Jinjer etc...producing new and exciting music.


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kingbob
LSU Fan
Sorrento, LA
Member since Nov 2010
49410 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
I actually kinda agree, to some extent, with that joking hypothesis. I believe that Pantera and Nirvana together killed rock n roll because they were novel, incredibly influential, and each took rock n roll in a direction far away from what teenage girls like. Now, you might say: who cares what they say? The reality is that most pop music is aimed at teen girls because they buy albums, and where they go, teen boys follow. The bar business and the music business is driven by young men buying drinks and tickets for young women. If the young women like it, the young men will spend money on it.

Pantera took metal into the direction of this unwinnable battle of edginess that eventually resulted in most metal being unintelligible pig squeals and screaming over shreddy, drop-tuned guitars with so much distortion that it’s impossible to discern the individual notes being played. While girls could kinda dig the power metal and more blues based hair metal, they largely weren’t into stuff like Job For A Cowboy or Cannibal Corpse.

At the same time, Nirvana took rock from dancable music (hair metal) into non-dancable music (grunge). This music was sad, melancholic, self-loathing, and nihilistic as opposed to positive, fun, and adventurous. Most young women enjoyed hair metal when it was popular for those reasons, but most also rejected grunge. Instead, young women jumped on the hip/hop and rap bandwagon because it was fun dance music. While there was a brief pop/crossover movement in the early 2000’s with pop punk, rock quickly moved away from that kind of music in the latter half of the 2000’s, and the young women who weren’t into rap dove deep into bro-country and EDM.

So, the reaction is once-again to introduce more pop elements into rock by incorporating trap, EDM, and country/folk influences to attract more female fans. Because women are gravitating to these “Alt” acts like Portugal the Man, Revivalists, Bastile, and The Head and the Heart, alt rock radio has gone in this direction, leaving what most recognize as “rock” music behind.

While metal has a large niche following, and traditional rock still has a significant niche following as well, rock as a whole finds itself bring consumed, much like disco nearly destroyed it in the 70’s. As musicians, we must question whether we want to adapt to the demands of the market (more poppy sounds like the Alt 92.3 bands), continue to stick to more traditional sounds to cater to the loyal niche market of metal heads, or simply hope that fluid public opinions might drift back to rock someday and that your music will be ready to ride that vvave.

There are, in fact, signs of this resurgence happening underground. Emo is making a big comeback and guitars and more emo style lyrics and vocals have been infiltrating the rap, hip/hop, trap, and edm scenes in recent years. While emo music was pretty much universally panned in the mid 2000’s, it seems to be leading The underground resurgence with teens and kids in their young 20’s under the labels emo, shoegaze, post rock, and mopevvave. Often times, this new version features emo vocals and lyrics with the spacey, mellow sounds now being employed by a lot of trap and alternative music. If what’s underground emerges, this guitar and effect-driven music could drag rock n roll back into the mainstream.
This post was edited on 9/10 at 11:08 am


Tchefuncte Tiger
LSU Fan
Bat'n Rudge
Member since Oct 2004
37863 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Any artist mentioned in this thread can be accessed on my phone in a touch of a button for the cost of purchasing an album once a month.


Much of the fun of listening to music for me was actually going to a record store and perusing the vinyl looking for albums to purchase.
This post was edited on 9/10 at 1:16 pm


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RockAndRollDetective
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2014
3558 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Most young women enjoyed hair metal when it was popular for those reasons, but most also rejected grunge.

Nope. Pre '92, the alt rock scene was mostly guys and mostly sparse. Once Teen Spirit hit, the crowds got huge mostly because girls were very into it.

Painting with a broad brush to try making sense of pop culture and musical trends always fails and comes off as dilettantish speculation.


Brosef Stalin
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2011
30680 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Pantera took metal into the direction of this unwinnable battle of edginess that eventually resulted in most metal being unintelligible pig squeals and screaming over shreddy, drop-tuned guitars with so much distortion that it’s impossible to discern the individual notes being played. While girls could kinda dig the power metal and more blues based hair metal, they largely weren’t into stuff like Job For A Cowboy or Cannibal Corpse.

This is just silly. Pantera has nothing to do with JFAC or Cannibal Corpse. Their styles aren't even remotely similar, Cannibal Corpse came up around the same time as Pantera too.

I noticed you completely forgot to mention nu metal's rise in the late 90s as Pantera was falling apart, then bands like Korn and Limp Bizkit even surpassed them in popularity. They had plenty of female fans too.

Nirvana, and alt rock in general, had lots of female fans too. You had bands like Smashing Pumpkins, Pearl Jam, STP, Bush, and a few others plus the entire explosion of female rock acts. Bjork, Alanis Morrisette, PJ Harvey, Liz Phair, Hole, No Doubt, Sonic Youth, etc were all pretty big in the early to mid 90s rock scene. Remember Lilith Fair? Girls even had their own traveling festival.


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30
Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99823 posts
 Online 

re: The death of rock music in two senses
quote:

Painting with a broad brush to try making sense of pop culture and musical trends always fails and comes off as dilettantish speculation.
No dilettante filigree fancy beats the plastic you.


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10
kingbob
LSU Fan
Sorrento, LA
Member since Nov 2010
49410 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses
It’s not Nirvana and Pantera that repulsed women, it’s the bands that followed their sound and influence.

The nu-metal bands attracted a female following thanks to their rap influences which kept it more “fun”.

Rock today only appeals to metal heads (a sizable, loyal niche market) and age 30+ dads. The hip kids are all making and listening to lame study music, luke bryant, edm, and mumble rap


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12
VOR
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Lap of Luxury
Member since Apr 2009
57083 posts

re: The death of rock music in two senses


quote:

Pro Tools and programs like it are a big cause IMO. They are great and allow a lot of people to make music, but they make it an 'easy' way out


Music has become like movies. Both have been influenced by digital innovation, making it much easier and less expensive to "create". It's become far too democratic, allowing untalented people, without much to say to produce something for distribution.


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