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LSUFanHouston
LSU Fan
NOLA
Member since Jul 2009
14511 posts
 Online 

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

So, she’s only teaching 15 hours a week, and has 25 hours a week to perform the other administrative work (planning, etc...) that goes along with teaching?


Classes are 90 min, along with one 90 min "planning period" every day, of which 3 days a week she has meetings (data team, professional learning community, communications team) and one day she has to be available to sub (because the school struggles to get enough subs on a daily basis, the teachers can be required to give up one planning period a week to sub for another class).

So she has 1-2 of her planning periods a week actually available to grade, plan lessons, etc. So all that counts for 30 hours a week (4 90-min sessions, 5 days a week).

They have a 35 min lunch period, during which she tutors and/or has organizational meetings, and 25 min a day is spent with morning announcements, and class switching.

She is required to report a half-hour before each morning bell and stay a half-hour after each morning bell. 3 of the 5 mornings, she has duty (hers is in the front of school). One day after work is a faculty-wide meeting, and one day a week after work is a department-wide meeting. So that leads 2 30 min sessions before school and 3 30 minute sessions after school. She offers tutoring after school one day a week (few kids show up).

So, her total time for admin/planning/grading work during the school day for a 5-day week: 1 or 2 90 min planning periods, 2 30 min before school periods, 3 30 min after school periods. So that's 4 hours to 5.5 hours a week. Grading, planning, admin BS, filling out reports, meeting with parents, etc - all in that time.

That's not enough, so she usually stays an hour later 2 days a week and works 4-5 hours a weekend.


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27
thegreatboudini
McNeese State Fan
Member since Oct 2008
4142 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

The easy answer is to find another parish but why should I have to move to make more?



I’m not a teacher, but in 2014 I moved to Houston Texas from Lafayette Louisiana and my salary went from 36k to 83k.

This is 2019 son. Get with the program.


tduecen
New York Yankees Fan
Member since Nov 2006
140869 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
Texas would be my go to, however, my SO isn't going to move due to her parents age


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02
KG6
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2009
10832 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Right, because what teachers did 20 years ago is relevant to what teachers do today.

This thread is showing some OT-level ignorance


Meh, my dad retired like 4 years ago.


tduecen
New York Yankees Fan
Member since Nov 2006
140869 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
he was a coach
Obviously, he had his time in and was counting the days to retirement so they may let him be.

I know I have a 45 minute planning period. During that 45 minutes, I'm usually meeting with students who were absent the previous day(s) or is in a meeting. I have to meet with our instructional coach twice a week to discuss curriculum/lesson planning. I also have a teaming meeting once a week on Friday. Usually, Friday is the only day I have free and I spend that time grading. I do not have another break the rest of the day either as I have lunch duty each day and recess duty.

Now is this typical of everywhere? No, but I know several parishes where this is the norm now. I do manage my time by going into work an hour early so I cab grade papers so that I don't have to bring them home but I usually end up with a stack of 100 papers a weekend since everything is a writing assignment now and we have to leave feedback.
This post was edited on 4/8 at 6:46 pm


CorkSoaker
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2008
9492 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Private school teachers are not paid near that and don’t have the benefits either. My wife has been teaching private school for 10+ years and doesn’t make 45k. Also, only 2% match, health is descent for her but they don’t cover much at all for kids portion.


You can’t put a price on the comparison of quality of life she has. If ever in doubt, tell her to substitute at a local public school one day.


nated14
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2009
121 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
Most professions not jobs often times have the person working more than a base 40. Either bc the professional enjoys their profession, decides to be better at their profession, or need extra time to manage their workload. The first two are a personal decision and the last can be argued as a lack of efficiency. More money is a short term motivator. How much money is your “spare” time worth? I put a price on mine years ago and have limits on both the price tag and how much spare time is for sale. If either is at a deficit I ultimately have the choice to stay or go. If I stay, that decision basically resets either of those standards which tells me it’s not all about salary. I miss lunch sometimes to get work done so I can go to my son’s ballgame and sometimes I answer emails from my bed. My work environment changes often and the rules that govern what I do change more often than not. I work for someone and we both work for a company so I expect that. I also researched the role before accepting it and the salary. I continue to stay because I feel my quality of life is balanced. There’s a breaking point somewhere but I haven’t found it. In short, more salary doesn’t mean I’d put up with more shit, but I’d love to put up with the same shite for more $$. Employment and compensation is a self regulating process. Your professional “worth” is decided by someone else. The choice to decide if it’s equitable is yours.


LSU1018
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2007
6660 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
The reason being a teacher is a terrible profession is bc you are not paid by how good you are. If you are the best teacher or worst teacher, you are still making the same amount of money. What drive does that give to teachers to be better?


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61
Jp1LSU
LSU Fan
Key West
Member since Oct 2005
1252 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

41,500 in Lafayette for a first year teacher. Based on 10 month work year so 49,800 annually. So say both spouses are teachers and that puts household income at 99,600. That puts them in the top 20% of households in the state of Louisiana as first year teachers at 23 years old


That’s some fuzzy math. If you make $41,500 for working 10 months, that’s all you make for the year unless you have another job.
I taught for a number of years and I recently left for more money. It wasn’t easy giving up the short hours/days of teaching. I don’t think teachers have much to complain about depending on what state you are in. Where I live teachers start at about $52k with very good benefits and pension.


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10
Jp1LSU
LSU Fan
Key West
Member since Oct 2005
1252 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

rivate school teachers are not paid near that and don’t have the benefits either. My wife has been teaching private school for 10+ years and doesn’t make 45k. Also, only 2% match, health is descent for her but they don’t cover much at all for kids portion.

I find private school teachers make bank, but parochial schools make considerable less. That’s why half the teachers at a religious school are borderline church volunteers.
It’s hard to find a private school in the USA under $25k per year. Those schools have plenty of monies for teachers.


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DallasTiger45
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since May 2012
5236 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

And teaching is a damn hard job. Teachers should be well rewarded for the crap they put with, be it from students, administrators, parents, etc


In what other industry are people rewarded for the "crap they have to put up with"?

Servers and customer service reps also have to put up with crap but don't typically make much. The barriers to entry in these fields are less than the well-paying jobs, so you make less.

I do feel for good teachers who work hard despite the mediocre to poor pay, but this is an appeal based on emotion and not reason.


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63
baldona
Auburn Fan
Florida
Member since Feb 2016
8891 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Right. So maybe teachers don't deserve any more money, because, hey, they knew it right?

If you think teachers are overpaid or don't deserve more money, fair enough.


You realize there’s a third option that everyone is saying right? That most teachers when you combine their time off and benefits, are paid about right? That’s what most are saying. No one is saying it’s an easy job, but most are paid $50-60k with 10 years experience.

Just like every other profession, if you want more money you go into management (admin) and the pay continues to increase.

I’m not saying teachers deserve less or have it easy, I’m saying for the most part they know what they are getting into and need to enjoy the positives of their jobs and not harp on the negatives like any career.


AUCE05
Atlanta Braves Fan
Member since Dec 2009
27932 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
Teachers are well above the mean in most locations. The fallacy in wanting higher wages for teachers is most professions don't pay well. Teachers are on par with nurses, and above trades like plumbers, etc. Should they be paid on par with engineers and lawyers? No. They don't generate revenue. From a business POV, teachers and a debt to the ledger. And with the volume of humans teaching, one could argue they are over paid.
This post was edited on 4/10 at 8:21 am


LSUFanHouston
LSU Fan
NOLA
Member since Jul 2009
14511 posts
 Online 

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

You realize there’s a third option that everyone is saying right? That most teachers when you combine their time off and benefits, are paid about right? That’s what most are saying. No one is saying it’s an easy job, but most are paid $50-60k with 10 years experience.


This is absolutely NOT the case in many systems especially in LA.

quote:

I’m saying for the most part they know what they are getting into and need to enjoy the positives of their jobs and not harp on the negatives like any career.


So, it's ok when me and you ask for a raise, but when teachers ask for a raise, they need to just shut up and get over it? Really?

So what happens when teachers say the hell with it and go find another profession (since many of y'all are suggesting they do that if they don't like the pay).


LSUFanHouston
LSU Fan
NOLA
Member since Jul 2009
14511 posts
 Online 

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Teachers are on par with nurses, and above trades like plumbers, etc.


I'm sorry, what?

The registered nurses I know (who need less education than a teacher needs) all make a min of $25 an hour plus pretty much unlimited overtime if they want it, due to shortages.

My plumber charges me $85 an hour just for his labor and overhead, plus he charges me for parts with a markup. I do not know a single master licensed plumber (again, something needing some education and a license) that makes less than $80,000 a year.

quote:

No. They don't generate revenue. From a business POV, teachers and a debt to the ledger.


Wow. I guess educating our kids isn't important, huh? Good thing schools aren't in business to make money.

quote:

And with the volume of humans teaching, one could argue they are over paid.


Most school districts have teacher shortages. Even if we did decide to start firing crappy teachers (which we need to do), there would be no one in line to replace them.


bayoubengals88
Wisconsin Fan
LA
Member since Sep 2007
11145 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Teachers are well above the mean in most locations. The fallacy in wanting higher wages for teachers is most professions don't pay well. Teachers are on par with nurses, and above trades like plumbers, etc. Should they be paid on par with engineers and lawyers? No. They don't generate revenue. From a business POV, teachers and a debt to the ledger. And with the volume of humans teaching, one could argue they are over paid.

It sounds like you could use 10 days in France and 14 in the PNW this summer, which is what I'll be doing....because I'm a teacher!

And just to add some hard facts to the discussion, I make 31.09 per hour currently and work exactly 182 days per year.
This post was edited on 4/10 at 9:32 am


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15
nated14
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2009
121 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
If they switch careers someone will take their place. Look at the enrollment numbers. That’s the way it works. Are you at your first employer? If not, did they close when you left? And did where you go expand to accommodate you?


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nated14
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2009
121 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
Some districts may have shortages but that’s more than likely due to the location. If an inner city hospital has a shortage of doctors is it because they don’t make good money? I can’t imagine how much being a garbage collector sucks but imagine if NOBODY took their place when they left and the fallout residentially. Supply and demand works for employment too. If there was an actual shortage and actual need it would regulate accordingly. That’s true for engineering too.


buckeye_vol
Ohio State Fan
Member since Jul 2014
30901 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Supply and demand works for employment too. If there was an actual shortage and actual need it would regulate accordingly. That’s true for engineering too.
It works for employment for jobs that function like an open market and companies are able to adjust pay accordingly. That’s not really how public jobs function. And there is also regulated certifications and barriers of entry when it comes to teachers and other various education staff (administrators, service providers, etc.).

And you’re right that location probably does play a role, but then trying to lure people to those locations with more competitive pay would help.

I mean Ohio pays teachers quite well, IMO, and teaching shortages haven’t been an issue. In fact, many of my friends who went into education, started out of state because of the lack of openings.

On the other hand, despite Louisiana having similar per pupil spending, its teacher pay looks quite terrible compared to most other places. So it’s not like Ohio is so much better than Louisiana that it resulted in an oversupply if teachers and those that leave tend to not look at states like LA and MS.


buckeye_vol
Ohio State Fan
Member since Jul 2014
30901 posts

re: Teachers of Money Talk - or husbands of teachers like me
quote:

Teachers are on par with nurses, and above trades like plumbers, etc
I mean a school nurse will usually be on the teacher salary schedule and may have an extra stipend on top of that. And school nurses usually make less than nurses in other positions, although the work hours are often quite different.

And it’s not surprising that the median salary for a career that requires at least a bachelor’s and specific certifications, would make more than a career in a trade.

That being said, trade pay probably has a skewed distributions with much more upside potential if one starts his/her own business.


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