Posted by
Message
Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9621 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I remember when that area was sleepy and underdeveloped and Reston now, it’s like Tyson’s Corner when I was a child.

I’m from Middleburg


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
chryso
Member since Jul 2008
8108 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
All texans are americans, not all americans are texans.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
12
StanSmith
LSU Fan
Member since May 2018
139 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
My mom's family is Sicilian on her mom and dads side. After being in the country for 3 or more generations I don't think any traits or traditions remain.

Remember though that when death is on the line never go in against a Sicilian.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
30
TruBrew
Grambling Fan
Shreveport
Member since Sep 2019
852 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Thats like saying what's the difference between white people and white people?


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
14
Cracker
Montana Fan
in a box
Member since Nov 2009
11188 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Jews and gentiles


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
Bestbank Tiger
Tulane Fan
RTWFU
Member since Jan 2005
52625 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Look at the map.

Italy is the boot. We're trying to punt Sicily away.


Eyebesmacinhose
LSU Fan
Enterprise, Louisiana
Member since Apr 2017
502 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I’m from near Sicily Island, LA. How many points is that?


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
Sho Nuff
New Orleans Saints Fan
Hawaii
Member since Feb 2009
10277 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

Culture wise, I would say that Sicilian families are a little country that Italian families. Manners / protocol is important , as it is to manny country people. Extended family, even to third cousins , is considered a close relative and usually part of gatherings. Food is more diverse bc if the influences. Food is also a bit simpler. Sauces/gravy may be a bit sweeter and/or piquant.

You described my mom's side pretty perfectly. When my great grandmother from Sicily turned 100, we had a huge family get together and apparently there were over 100 cousins. I was young but I do remember a lot of people there and my GG singing some Italian bullfrog song

My grandmother was the best cook ever. Her sweet red gravy and she would use boiled eggs in place of meat as that's what they did in Sicily because they were poor. But, when she did also make meatballs, they were huge and delicious. Damn, I miss her and her food


Cowboyfan89
McNeese State Fan
Member since Sep 2015
8622 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
We are Sicilian on my dad's side (grandmother came over from Sicily). Don't really know the difference myself, but I've been told that should I ever decide to visit Sicily, I should never mention the family name. Some of the family was Mafia. One (who I presume was a relative) even got expelled from the US and ended up getting blown up by a car bomb in Sicily.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
dolamite
da' berry
Member since Sep 2009
479 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
All 4 of my grandparents were from Sicily (small villages near Palermo). All came over near the turn of the 20th century during open immigration. We have always referred to our family/families as "Italian". But, piss any of us off, and we become "Sicilian" in a heart beat!


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
20
TD SponsorTD Fan
USA
Member since 2001
Thank you for supporting our sponsors
Advertisement
Spankum
LSU Fan
Miss-sippi
Member since Jan 2007
50290 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

poor. But, when she did also make meatballs, they were huge and delicious. Damn, I miss her and her food


Man, what I wouldn’t give to sit down at my grandmothers table just one more time for a plate of spaghetti. We used to go every Sunday for lunch.


Sho Nuff
New Orleans Saints Fan
Hawaii
Member since Feb 2009
10277 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

Spankum



GynoSandberg
Houston Astros Fan
Member since Jan 2006
65803 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian



good book written by a Loyola professor


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
30
CharleyLake
Member since Oct 2006
977 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
About thirty years ago a man named Tony Sandanato moved to Lake Charles from Buffalo, New York and became my daughter's softball coach.

I told him that he would feel at home because I grew up with a lot of good Italians in the Goosport area. He said that they were not Italians but Sicilians, They are dark!


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
SuperSaint
LA-Lafayette Fan
Sorting Out OT BS Since '2007'
Member since Sep 2007
113379 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
In-law’s a ‘Catania’, first generation from Catania, my trip to visit/stay with the extended family in April was delayed because da WuFlu.


AMA?


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
12
RedPop4
USA Fan
Santiago de Compostela
Member since Jan 2005
11956 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Bread and Respect: The Italians of Louisiana by Anthony V. Margavio is a fantastic book.

I could "see" my extended family and many people I know in the descriptions of the Sicilians.

I didn't get to experience the whole "big Italian family" dynamic as my grandmother was the youngest of her generation born in 1905 here, whilst her older sister was born in 1880 in Sicily. My mother, then was the youngest of her generation and only had one older brother and grandmother died when I was four. I am the youngest of my generation and knew my cousins, but not the much older ones, and by then, everyone else had their families and the big Sunday was already petering out in the 1960s and 1970s when I was little. :(

I and a few relatives have red hair and light eyes. Two of my grandfather's sisters had it, and my first cousin has it, as well. It is not prevalent, but it is common and well-known among Sicilians.


TxTiger82
Wisconsin Fan
Member since Sep 2004
33067 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Modern Italians are genetically a mixture of the Latin-Gallic population of the Roman Empire and the Germanic peoples (eg the Lombards) who moved in during the late stages of the Western empire and the early Middle Ages.

Sicilians have a different genetic blend -- originally more Greek than Latin, with genetic influences from North Africa and Iberia along with Italy and the Germanic peoples.

Obviously, I'm painting with broad strokes here.


The Ramp
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Jul 2004
10572 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Half and half. My grandparents from my dads side (northern Italian) did not care for my mom's side (Sicilian). But both spoke Italian at home. Dad baked and mom cooked. Both excellent. When I went to Sicily last year, I couldn't understand anything. I asked if they were speaking Sicilian and they said no but they mispronounce everything. Hard to understand.
This post was edited on 8/1 at 9:57 pm


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
Niccolo Machiavelli
Member since Jun 2020
227 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
There is literally no ethnic difference between southern Italians and Sicilians


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
RedPop4
USA Fan
Santiago de Compostela
Member since Jan 2005
11956 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Don't forget the Normans and the Celts actually passed through as well. Then there are the Abreshse as was previously mentioned.

My folks came from a small town a 45-minute train ride into the mountains from Palermo. It's an entirely different world up there. Even today, people in Alia, where we're from, mostly eat what they grow. Coastal Sicilians eat a lot of seafood, they don't get that inland in the mountains.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
20
first pageprev pagePage 6 of 7next pagelast page

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram