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Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9620 posts
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re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

Why are Greeks dark


The earliest peoples in Europe had dark skin, and blue eyes. Someone did a genetic reconstruction of an early Western European Hunter Gatherer, and that was one of the surprises.

Blue eyes, dark complexion.

That’s not to say the Greeks are heavily influenced by that gene pool.

Nutrition aside, people with Hunter Gatherer roots will be taller than those from farming backgrounds.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:07 pm


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Tchefuncte Tiger
LSU Fan
Bat'n Rudge
Member since Oct 2004
42913 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I've never been to Italy proper, but spent some time at Naval Air Station Sigonella. The best part of our DET rotations was when they put us up at the the Sigonella Inn after our relief detachment arrived.


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Vacherie Saint
New Orleans Saints Fan
Member since Aug 2015
22947 posts
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re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

the Normands





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80
Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9620 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

True Turks look more like orientals, look at Turkmenistan and Uzbekistan.


Many of the Turks I’ve met look Greek, or even Roman, they have the faces you see in ancient mosaics.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:05 pm


Pisco
Alabama Fan
Western Kentucky
Member since Dec 2019
710 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
My Dad’s side is from Naples. Some of the words are pronounced different in Italiano


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Mike da Tigah
Waypoint Bravo Romeo Lima Alpha
Member since Feb 2005
52203 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Damn cantaloupes.


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Manlaw35
Louisiana Tech Fan
Member since Jan 2013
897 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Go ahead and speed through their island and find out.



FYI, the biggest waterfalls in Louisiana are just west of Sicily Island in the Sicily Island Hills State WMA.



LINK
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:16 pm


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70
AbuTheMonkey
Notre Dame Fan
Chicago, IL
Member since May 2014
7036 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Similar to a famous quote about the Pyrenees, "Africa begins below the Liri".

Central and northern Italy are very much a part of the Central (Austrian/Germanic/Swiss) and Western (French) European sphere, have been for 1,500+ years, and their history, heritage, culture, cuisine, ethnicity, and so on very much reflect that.

Southern Italy and especially Sicily might as well be a different country and, people forget, were a different country only 6 or 7 generations ago. The U.S. is an older country than is a unified Italy. The Mediterranean (Greek, Arab, Balkan, Spanish, etc.) roots run very deep in that part of the world. It is also the very poorest region of what would traditionally be considered Western Europe. Much of it makes the Mississippi Delta and Eastern Kentucky look positively developed and enlightened in comparison.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:10 pm


Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9620 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Culturally the south is a different world too - backwards, honor driven. You see the same dichotomy that once existed in the United States, between an industrial north, and an agrarian south.

I believe, as some have written, that the Normans had a profound cultural impact on the (Italian) South.

This post was edited on 8/1 at 12:20 pm


OleWar
USA Fan
Troy H. Middleton Library
Member since Mar 2008
4518 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Have you read this?




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Dandy Lion
Georgia Fan
Lake Oconee
Member since Feb 2010
48196 posts
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re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Pesky peaky blinders.


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HempHead
Alabama Fan
Appalachia
Member since Mar 2011
49251 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

I believe, as some have written, that Normans has a profound cultural impact on the South.



Can you give me a lead for this?



This book is excellent. I definitely see the confluence of the Borderers and Cavaliers in the South, or at least where I grew up.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:18 pm


Keltic Tiger
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Dec 2006
13212 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I've always heard that the Sicilian mafia, in its hay days, made the Italian mafia look like kindergarten kids. I've also heard that Sicilians are extremely clannish.


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60
Tygra
LSU Fan
Bee Are
Member since Jan 2008
328 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Correct. Italy minus empires of course was a collection of states. These states hated each other and fought often. Some states are more similar, but Sicily and the rest of Italy are indeed very different. The food in the mountainous regions is very different from an island. Wine of course being the premium example of that.

My grandfather would get very insulted if anyone confused him with a Sicilian. He refused to let my mother and her siblings speak Italian in public because of the Sicilian stigma. He hated the stereotype and in New York it was rampant as was the mob’s influence. That being said the man looked like Junior from the sopranos, so I could understand why people were confused.


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ehidal1
Houston Astros Fan
Chief Boot Knocka
Member since Dec 2007
30646 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I’m 1/4 Sicilian. My grandmother came from Sicily as a child. Supposedly my great uncle had ties to the mob through his bakery.

No idea about Sicilian vs Italian. And I don’t get offended from any names. In fact, I love stereotype humor about all types.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:47 pm


HempHead
Alabama Fan
Appalachia
Member since Mar 2011
49251 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

No idea about Sicilian vs Italian. And I don’t get offended from any names. In fact, I love stereotype humor about all types.



Honestly, the amount of you guineas on here is astounding. I never knew any Italians growing up.


Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9620 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
I have!

It’s truly one of my favorite books. It was the book that helped me to understand the cultural cleavages in this country, and my own culture.

I didn’t understand what I was, or where my values came from. I just knew my normal wasn’t universal.


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ehidal1
Houston Astros Fan
Chief Boot Knocka
Member since Dec 2007
30646 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
Honestly, I don’t think about it much at all. My grandmothers family was all old and I’m not sure there are any remaining relatives on her side left. She only had 2 sisters (all 3 have passed) and neither had children. I don’t look Italian or Sicilian, have blue eyes, and have a Spanish last name.
This post was edited on 7/31 at 9:48 pm


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AbuTheMonkey
Notre Dame Fan
Chicago, IL
Member since May 2014
7036 posts

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

quote:
People from North Africa are Arabs, not black people.


Outside of Egypt, they're really Berbers/Maghrebi. I think you'd piss off a Tunisian if you called him Arab.


North Africa is complicated, to be honest. Tunisians, to your example, definitely consider themselves to be a cut above the rest of the Maghreb and not only consider themselves Arab/Berber but the true (and really, correct) and rightful heirs to the Carthaginians and Vandals.

Moroccans, as another example, have a lot of both as well but many consider themselves to be "Andalusians", which is basically a Berber-Arab-Southwest European mixture.

North Africa is really an incredible place. If you draw a straight line from Agadir to Sfax, like 90+% of Africa's population (excluding the Nile Delta) north of the 15th parallel lives in that piece of turf bordering the Med, the Atlantic, and the Atlas Mountains. The history, the cultural idiosyncrasies (a huge portion of the population speaks French and many speak English as well), the food, the beaches, the mountains, and so on, and so on - it really has so much potential. Morocco and Tunisia are already middle-income countries - and are really cool places to visit - and are poised to continue to develop and become serious players in Mediterranean affairs; Algeria probably has the most potential of all (they were the largest exporter of wine in the world until the French left and are just now starting to take baby steps back in that direction, as an example), but they have a bad latent Islamic radical problem and are still recovering from the effects of two of the worst wars the world saw after 1945. Libya is a backwards shithole and has been for 2,000 years (it's the West Virginia of the Arab world, and that is saying something), and that won't change. Egypt is its own thing (not Maghrebi, for sure) and while it has been the leading intellectual center for Arab culture for hundreds of years (and still really is), it is far too volatile. But the Maghreb really can go places if they play their cards right.


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Lima Whiskey
Virginia Fan
Member since Apr 2013
9620 posts
 Online 

re: Italian vs. Sicilian
quote:

I definitely see the confluence of the Borderers and Cavaliers in the South, or at least where I grew up.


So do I

We are the children of truly medieval cultures. I love the world we grew up in, and it will always be there, close to my heart.
This post was edited on 8/1 at 12:19 pm


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