Posted by
Message
BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38191 posts

Making Artisanal Bread
Thinking about starting to make my own bread at home. I've had some delicious bread at many restaurants and it's harder and harder to find anything really good in the grocery store nowadays, so why not make my own.

What are some good cookbooks for making your own bread? I believe there are a few bread makers on the board, any tips?

These are some of the cookbooks i'm looking at.

Image: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/5163n%2BORUzL._SX398_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


Image: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51mgUbcbXIL._SX400_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


Image: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61P9WU7dLEL._SX458_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg
This post was edited on 1/21 at 7:42 am


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
68654 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I cannot recommend Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast more highly. It's a great book for new bread bakers.


Thread on the topic: LINK

Pictures sadly gone because Tiny Pic sucks. Use Imgur for your pics!
This post was edited on 1/16 at 8:40 am


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
20031 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

I cannot recommend Flour, Water, Salt, Yeast more highly. It's a great book for new bread bakers.


agree. Forkish get a little crazy with the levain building and uses way too much flour for at home recipes. I'd read FWSY for knowledge and try recipes from theperfectloaf.com

I've been baking my own natural sourdough breads for about a year. I have learned that temperature is often the most important factor in how your breads will develop. Good luck to the OP--do not get frustrated-it takes time to learn and get it right.


jordan21210
USA Fan
Member since Apr 2009
11092 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I have Flour Water Salt Yeast, yet to dive into it though.

In the meantime, my first bread baking foray was a no-knead bread in my Dutch Oven. Delicious and incredibly easy to make.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
20
BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38191 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

agree. Forkish get a little crazy with the levain building and uses way too much flour for at home recipes.


One of the amazon reviews mentions this. Also mentions there is a typo somewhere that uses too much flour in a recipe.

quote:


I've been baking my own natural sourdough breads for about a year. I have learned that temperature is often the most important factor in how your breads will develop. Good luck to the OP--do not get frustrated-it takes time to learn and get it right.


Well, i'm a homebrewer as well, so i know a little bit about fermentation and yeast starters, though with bread, it's in different context.
This post was edited on 1/16 at 8:46 am


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
68654 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Forkish get a little crazy with the levain building and uses way too much flour for at home recipes.


Ken now admits that his levain directions in FWSY isn't good for the home baker.

Good criticism.




Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
20031 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Well, i'm a homebrewer as well, so i know a little bit about fermentation and yeast starters, though with bread, it's in different context.


Ah that's right. So you have a good basis for understanding. It's all about the bubbles and the ferment of the medium. Keep us posted. you will be addicted soon.

PS: natural sourdough bread is really good for the gut microbes.


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38191 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Image: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61zge0AJoCL._SX425_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


Reading the reviews on this book as well. Seems pretty highly rated.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
68654 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I have both.

I liked FWSY better when I first began.


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
20031 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Ken now admits that his levain directions in FWSY isn't good for the home baker.



I was going through flour like crazy and knew something was off. He should issue an edit or an updated version.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38191 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

I have both.

I liked FWSY better when I first began.



I think i'll go with FWSY first. Have they updated the book to address the over flour issue?


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
8789 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Tartine Bread is great too. Teaches basic sourdough techniques and how to apply them to a large variety of breads.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
01
BlackenedOut
The Big Sleazy
Member since Feb 2011
5288 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Forkish, great book. Also check out Peter REinhart's Artisan Breads everyday. I like that book.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
beerJeep
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since Nov 2016
24324 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

find anything really good in the grocery store nowadays,


Bunny plantation and Albertsons French bread when it’s fresh out the oven are the GOATs


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
07
hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
11416 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I don't know the Norman book, but Forkish and Reinhart are the gold standard. Forkish has very workable timetables for people won't aren't home all day, the Reinhart book has a bunch of excellent info for beginners on wheat, how dough becomes bread in the oven, etc. The aforementioned Tartine book is great, but not laid out in the most logical or concise fashion--but the bread is so.damn.good.

A truly excellent resource is online at www.thefreshloaf.com A whole slew of amateur but serious bakers hang out there, and a few pros, too. You can ask for help troubleshooting a recipe, a technique, an ingredient: chances are, some bread obsessive on TFL will offer up their own experiences/knowledge.

Also, the King Arthur Flour website is a good place for beginners. Lots of solid recipes, and best of all: a real helpline, answered by humans who know how to bake. They can talk you through a recipe failure.

There are a few SHBs (serious home bakers) here at TD, too.

Other books to consider (check the public library first):
--Dan Leader, Bread Alone (nice regional Euro recipes)
--Bread, by Jeffrey Hamelman, former head baker at King Arthur Flour. A serious, solid book, with baker's percentage formulas rather than recipes. Fantastic step up once you've nailed the basics.
--Jim Lahey, My Bread. The no-knead loaf cookbook that started the craze, still the most downloaded recipe from the NY Times food section.
--Myrvhold's Modernist Bread....the bread version of Modernist Cuisine. Gorgeous photography, but at times wonky recipes written in odd formats. Worth a look if your library has it, $500 if you want your own (yes, I bought it)
This post was edited on 1/16 at 11:06 am


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
53
TimeOutdoors
Mississippi St. Fan
Depends on the day
Member since Sep 2014
5964 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I have the first two books on your list. I am a $500 round trip flight to the nearest grocery store so I have made alot of bread over the last year. If you want something that is easy to use and cleanup you might want to take a look at this break maker. Amazon Link for Bread Maker They also have a two lb version (my sister picked up one recently after hearing me rave about mine and she loves it).

Seriously, this is one of the best purchase I have made in a long time. I make a couple loafs a week.. usually one regular sandwich bread and one specialty type.



CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
51765 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

I am a $500 round trip flight to the nearest grocery store


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
68654 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Montana, Wyoming, rural west, Alaska


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
02
hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
11416 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

you might want to take a look at this break maker. Amazon Link for Bread Maker They also have a two lb version (my sister picked up one recently after hearing me rave about mine and she loves it).

While I don't have a breadmaker, that Zoji gets rave reviews. I prefer a mixer (Ankarsrum) to a breadmaker, but they're great tools for anyone who doesn't like kneading. Too many people get stuck on not liking the in-machine baking: but you can set a dough cycle and take the dough out to shape, rise, & bake however you'd like.


TimeOutdoors
Mississippi St. Fan
Depends on the day
Member since Sep 2014
5964 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Only way to get here is by plane.. I am in town 5-6 times a year with work so I load up when in town. I am fortunate that we have a post office so I can get limited supplies through amazon and Sams Club/Costco.

There is an expediter I can use in town that will pick up supplies, take them to a local flight service we have out here, and they will ship out for about $1 per pound. Then the expediter charges about 20-25%. I have started using instacart to have it delivered so that helps.

The good news is I am in one of the best places in the world for fish. We also have plenty of Black Bear and Moose so I don't really have to worry about meat very often.

We have zero stores or restaurants here. There is a little food truck/trailer kind of like a snack shack that is open for lunch from June-Sept. It serves soft drinks, hamburgers, and milk shakes. When the school has basketball or volleyball games they have a concession open. Other than that you are cooking for yourself.



Jump to page
Page 1 2 3 4 5 ... 12
Jump to page
first pageprev pagePage 1 of 12next pagelast page

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram