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hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Tall narrow container let’s you easily and accurately determine when the mixture has doubled in size. This is hard to judge in a low, wide bowl. Doubling in size is one standard way of knowing if the culture is sufficiently active to raise a loaf of bread. Pay attention/record how much water and flour you feed it.


gaetti15
Navy Fan
AK
Member since Apr 2013
10318 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Alaska
Surrounded by 4 million acres of National Park and Preserve


Lol that's easy living.

Now move further west


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BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Tall narrow container let’s you easily and accurately determine when the mixture has doubled in size. This is hard to judge in a low, wide bowl. Doubling in size is one standard way of knowing if the culture is sufficiently active to raise a loaf of bread. Pay attention/record how much water and flour you feed it.



So according to the directions for the sour dough starter, i'm supposed to remove half the starter regardless of signs of fermentation or not, and add more flour and water. Could i do so, and move teh mixture to a large mason jar? Or do i need to wait to see some sort of sign of fermentation.

Also, i'm using the red mill whole grain stone ground dark rye flour in the sourdough starter. Is there any reason this flour would not be a good contender for making a sourdough starter?


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
8305 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Man get some King Arthur All Purpose and use half that and half rye.


BlackCoffeeKid
LSU Fan
Thibodaux/Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2016
5955 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
As somebody who has recently started going down the rabbit hole of bread making as well, I would like to nominate this thread as the official breadthread of the F&D board.


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10
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Man get some King Arthur All Purpose and use half that and half rye.


I have some. This is just for the starter.

LINK

The starter recipe calls for rye or wheat for the initial starter, then feeding it with king arthur all purpose.

ETA: Also, any good apps for keeping track of your starters/bread?
This post was edited on 1/21 at 7:40 am


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
OK, i'm going to restart the sourdough starter after watching this video from Alex French.

LINK

First off, he uses bottled water because it doesn't have chlorine. I was using tap water. Is this a big concern in practicality?


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
67363 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Not a huge issue. But something to consider with bread is that there are very few ingredients so using the best you can source is very helpful.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
This article explains the starter process much better than say the simple recipe from King Arthur. I'll be going this route.

LINK


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
8305 posts
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re: Making Artisanal Bread
I've used BR tap water from the start with no issues.


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Centinel
Alabama Fan
South Carolina
Member since Sep 2016
23439 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Alaska
Surrounded by 4 million acres of National Park and Preserve.
Lake Clark National Park Article


So how close to you live to Dick Proenneke's cabin?

I am seriously jealous of where you live. I'd move to that area in about five seconds flat if the wife would agree.


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hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Yes, the article is a good one; Maurizio writes clearly and accurately. So much BS surrounds sourdough. Much of it is folklore and not remotely scientific or factual.

You don't need an app. This is not complicated stuff. In fact, it is the simplest and most primitive way of making bread. The Egyptians made enough sourdough bread daily to feed the thousands of enslaved people & artisans who built the pyramids....you can certainly keep a starter alive without an app.

I keep a small quantity mother stater, because I hate waste. There is zero reason to be mixing 1 cup of water and 1 cup of flour, only to discard it the next day. I find that 1-2 tablespoons of old starter mixed with 1/3 cup water and 1/3 cup flour (wheat, white, rye, or a mix) works just fine. Yeast's reproduction at warm room temp (75ish degrees) is about four hours...so if you want to get a starter moving quickly, feed it every 4 hours and keep it in a warmer place.

On the other hand, if you aren't using metric tons of starter day in and day out, keep it cool. I routinely store my starter in the fridge for weeks and weeks (okay, really months). I will pull it out and feed it 2x daily for a few days to "wake" it up before using.

All of the poured-off discard can go into sourdough waffles, pancakes, or be mixed into commercially leavened loaves for flavor.

Finally, I keep my starter at 100% hydration: equal parts flour and water, simply because it makes the baker's math simple and easy. Should I want to make a wetter or drier build of the starter for a particular style of bread, I know what my starting point is.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
67363 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
You still pushing the pineapple juice?


gmrkr5
LSU Fan
Apex, NC
Member since Jul 2009
14092 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I'll throw this one in there.. LaFarm's artisanal breads are great
Image: https://www.lafarmbakery.com/sites/default/files/APassionforBreadBLAD%20%282%29_Page_1.jpg
This post was edited on 1/21 at 10:59 am


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BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Another question, my wife has a kitchen aid stand mixer. Any advantages to using these in bread making, or is it all prefered by hand? Figure i might use it if it makes things easy.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Yep, pineapple juice will get ya over the hump if you're having trouble getting a starter going.

More good books for the list:
Eric Kayser's The Larousse of Bread: LINK
Carol Field's The Italian Baker, Revised: LINK


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12
Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
19757 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I wish I had a mixer. Should be no problem for the initial mixes in recipes.

Obviously you don't need a mixer for your starter feedings


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

I wish I had a mixer.

80% of the loaves I bake are made without a mixer, even for big, 6-loaf batches. The high-hydration, long slow rise, and stretch-and-fold technique promoted by Robertson in Tartine, Forkish in FWSY, will convince you that you can make excellent bread sans mixer.

About the only thing I use a mixer for these days is 1)brioche, as mixing in beaucoup butter by hand is nearly impossible and 2)large batches of challah, because I don't like kneading really eggy doughs by hand.


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
19757 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

The high-hydration, long slow rise, and stretch-and-fold technique promoted by Robertson in Tartine, Forkish in FWSY, will convince you that you can make excellent bread sans mixer.


and I do make great bread without a mixer. It seems to me that the initial mix would be easier with a mixer. Hell, I've used a hand mixer with dough attachments and produced great bread.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

seems to me that the initial mix would be easier with a mixer

I use a danish dough whisk, like this: LINK
Easy to clean, mixes more efficiently than a spoon, doesn't get clogged up like a balloon whisk.


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