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BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
We have a kichen aid mixer, and my sis in law gave me a bread maker, similar to the one recommended. But i'd prefer to use my cast iron pot and make by hand just to learn how it's supposed to be done.


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TimeOutdoors
Mississippi St. Fan
Depends on the day
Member since Sep 2014
4943 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

While I don't have a breadmaker, that Zoji gets rave reviews. I prefer a mixer (Ankarsrum) to a breadmaker, but they're great tools for anyone who doesn't like kneading. Too many people get stuck on not liking the in-machine baking: but you can set a dough cycle and take the dough out to shape, rise, & bake however you'd like.


100 percent correct. I do this when I am making tortillas. You can also make cookie dough, pasta etc in it. It's been a game changer for me. I make walnut bread and Hawaiian bread pretty often in it. I also make a cinnamon raisin bread for breakfast. We do alot of pot luck meals with work/community and I usually bring bread or home made ice cream (don't get much ice cream out here).


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CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
50437 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
yea i figured you were in the boonies/bush/prairie/outback/plains/tundra. I was just wondering where.


TimeOutdoors
Mississippi St. Fan
Depends on the day
Member since Sep 2014
4943 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

yea i figured you were in the boonies/bush/prairie/outback/plains/tundra. I was just wondering where.


Alaska
Surrounded by 4 million acres of National Park and Preserve.
Lake Clark National Park Article


NEMizzou
Missouri Fan
Columbia MO
Member since Nov 2013
1170 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I use Lahey's no-knead pizza dough recipe and really like it...anyone read through this?

Image: https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/61SBam5Z8gL._SX398_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg


BlackCoffeeKid
LSU Fan
Thibodaux/Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2016
5927 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I've read Bread Baker's Apprentice.

For somebody relatively new to baking/bread it's a great book that really breaks down the overall process.
Plenty of recipes as well.


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hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10458 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

anyone read through this?

yes, mentioned it upthread. It's a good entry point to high-hydration, low-kneaded bread. But, the Forkish book has more info on manipulating time and temperature to achieve more interesting flavors. Lahey focuses on recipes, he doesn't dive deeply into stretch & fold as a low-intensity technique...and his shaping instructions aren't so great. It's pretty much a wet blob & he encourages very limited shaping....whereas Forkish provides some detailed descriptions on how shaping builds internal structure into a wet dough. If you care about stuff like the grigne/ears opening up along lines scored into a loaf, then read Forkish before Lahey.

Lahey's My Pizza, his second book, is the formula I routinely use for baking-steel-broiler pizza in my home oven that is every bit as good as a wood fired pizza.


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
19749 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I'd be interested in a book that focuses only on natural leavened recipes. I don't want to use commercial yeast for anything.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10458 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Tartine is all about levain (wild yeast), and the Forkish FWSY book has a whole section on levain....all in the young, slightly sour french style.

If you want all sourdough, all the time, also look at Andrew Whitley's little book Do Sourdough: Slow Bread for Busy Lives. It's simple, approachable, and not fussy. He includes recipes for tinned loaves, not just baked-in-a-pot rustic boules. LINK

I use commercial yeast and sourdough equally; depends on the flavor I'm trying to achieve, my time constraints, etc.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Does sourdough just refer to what yeast you are using? Commercial yeast being just your standard bread, but sourdough is through wild yeast? Sort of like the classification of sour beer?


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Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
8297 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Yes. It refers to being naturally leavened which means that some lactobacillus are present in your leavening agent or starter. This leads to the production of acid during fermentation which gives it a sour taste. The level of sourness can be adjusted through several methods.



hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10458 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Commercial yeast being just your standard bread, but sourdough is through wild yeast?

Commercial yeast is packaged yeast. You buy it in either compressed fresh cake form (not common) or granular (very common). The granular stuff is what most people think of when you say "yeast"....it comes in "active dry" and "instant" formulations. The instant is a super-concentrated yeast--you need less of it to achieve the same thing as active dry yeast. Instant is sold in 1-lb bricks at Sams/Costco for about $3.50/lb. Way cheaper than the three packets of Fleischmans in a strip from the supermarket.

Wild yeast is just a culture of naturally occurring yeast. Mix flour & water, keep feeding it a little every day, discarding the excess, and eventually, the yeast population will grow strong enough to raise a loaf of bread. There are many, many feeding schedules, kinds of flours, temperature manipulations, and other variations to keeping sourdough cultures going....and just as many ways to incorporate it into various breads.

When I bake for commercial sale, I use the Forkish style long, cold fermented loaves made w/commercial yeast. The commercial yeast is very predictable (important when you're doing volume production), and an overnight cold bulk fermentation of the dough produces some nice secondary lactobacterial fermentation important for flavor. So even commercial yeast can be tweaked for maximum flavor...there's no need to go to all levain/wild yeast to achieve a nuanced loaf.


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33
BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

es. It refers to being naturally leavened which means that some lactobacillus are present in your leavening agent or starter. This leads to the production of acid during fermentation which gives it a sour taste. The level of sourness can be adjusted through several methods


Ok, cool. Like sour beer. I have several sour beer batches currently in my pipeline. Bread is def in my purview


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BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Ok, so I am starting my levain tonight using the King Arthur sourdough starter recipe using whole dark rye flour. It says to use 1 cup flour to 1/2 cup cool water (I measured by weight, 113 g each). The flour couldn’t get entirely wet so I added a little more water to make sure there was no dry flour. Should the mixture pretty much be a solid? Rather than runny? Because it’s a pretty solid thick piece of dough I have right now.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
67347 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
It shouldn't be runny. Make sure all the flour is wet to some degree and you'll be good.


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hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10458 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
If it is solid, it’s not truly a levain. Levain refers particularly to mostly liquid cultures used when they’re not too sour. You’ve got a sourdough starter....be warned that a dry, firm starter may take longer to get going than a liquid one.

Baked two loaves of Tartine style pain au levain with toasted sesame seeds today. Hadn’t used my starter in quite some time, so I fed it every four hours on Friday, gave it a big feed on Saturday AM, then built the levain on Sat evening. Mixed the dough Sun AM, bulk fermented overnight, shaped this AM and baked after a 3-hour shaped rise. I did one loaf in a sandwich tin, and other as a boule, baked inside of an old school enameled steel GraniteWare covered turkey roaster. It is lighter weight than cast iron, yet it transfers heat and traps steam beautifully. A heckuva lot easier to hoist in and out of the oven, too.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Ok, I added a little more water and stirred up. How’s it look?



hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10458 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Looks like flour and water. Gonna take 4-5 days of regular feeds.....or even as long as a week to be active enough to raise a loaf of bread. Depends on ambient temps, and other factors.


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KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
67347 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Ok, I added a little more water and stirred up. How’s it look?


Is that it's long term home?


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35938 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:


Is that it's long term home?


The bowl, yes. Should I keep it in a jar instead?


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