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BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Feed it today, and replace the water with canned pineapple juice (straight, not a cocktail or a sweetened juice). The acidity of the pineapple juice will "sour" the culture sufficiently to favor yeast over the other wee beasties who have moved into your mixture and are bubbling away. You also introduced who-knows-what with your beer culture...


i'll do this. Thanks for the advice.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Also, try feeding smaller amounts, but 2x daily. 1 tablespoon of the existing culture, 1/3 cup water (pineapple juice this time), 1/3 cup flour (mixed rye/wheat if you like). Do this AM and PM.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
What’s that in weight? I’ve been sticking to using grams per the books.


BlackCoffeeKid
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Thibodaux/Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2016
5955 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

What’s that in weight?

It depends on the type of flour and atmospheric conditions.
Just weigh 1/3 cup of water and then figure out how much flour that is.

The way I look at it, people in ancient times successfully made sourdough... I feel like it doesn't need to be extremely exact


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
I weigh when making dough, but an approx volume measurement is close enough for feeling a starter. I’m usually too lazy to break out the scale for a single dose of flour.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

hungryone


So i guess threatening my sourdough starter yesterday worked. I fed my starter last night, and again, was expecting no signs of growth. I didn't have a chance to get any pineapple juice yet, so i used water as normal. Well, this morning, i go to feed it again, and my starter tripled in its rise. I'm still going to pick up some pineapple juice, but i may not need it. Hopefully i'll be able to make a sourdough loaf in a couple weeks.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Hopefully i'll be able to make a sourdough loaf in a couple weeks.



Why are you waiting a couple of weeks? If the starter is reliably doubling in 4-6 hrs, you can use it. There is ZERO advantage to waiting any longer. It's sufficiently lively to make bread. Get to it.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Why are you waiting a couple of weeks? If the starter is reliably doubling in 4-6 hrs, you can use it. There is ZERO advantage to waiting any longer. It's sufficiently lively to make bread. Get to it.



Because i don't have time to make bread this weekend or next. So it would have to be the week after. And if i get a couple more days of constant activity, i'll just store it in the fridge and feed it once/week.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Because i don't have time to make bread this weekend or next.

Ah, you only THINK you don't have time to make bread. You do. If you are 1)at home for 2-3 hours, and 2)have a refrigerator, you can make bread.
--feed starter in AM before you leave, feed in PM before you go to bed.
--next AM, mix levain. Let it sit out at room temp all day.
--that evening, mix the dough. Follow the Forkish recipe, or a Tartine style....IOW, take the levain you mixed, dissolved in water, add flour...let autolyse 20 mins, add salt/extra water, and mix w/your hands. Mix again in 30 mins; do another 2-3 stretch and folds. Note that the time required is not continuous...you can be doing other things over the 3-4 hr period. Before you go to sleep, divide and shape the dough, put into floured-towel lined bowls, cover, and put in fridge.
--next AM, preheat oven, pull dough out of fridge, and bake. Or leave dough in fridge until afternoon, and bake after work.

The beauty of high-hydration sourdough is that it requires very little active time--just a few bursts of stuff to do here and there. Your fridge can be used to manipulate the schedule according to your convenience.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Ah, you only THINK you don't have time to make bread. You do. If you are 1)at home for 2-3 hours, and 2)have a refrigerator, you can make bread.


No, i really don't. I'm brewing 2 batches of beer and smoking a pork butt on Saturday. Have to bring the kids to a birthday party on Sunday, then next weekend i'll be in the NOLA area for mardi gras.

And the aforementioned kids, removes me from making bread during the week.

I can't multitask on my first bread. I want to take the time to do it right. To get my folding down and hand mixing. I have been practicing my folding on some pizza dough i made. It was a simple dough from Bobby Flay, i used the kitchen aid mixer, and did the folds after the dough rise (1 hour). Compared to my previous doughs, this one had a much more "put together" texture, whereas before, i knew nothing of bread/dough making.


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Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
19757 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Good work man. and good choice to wait until you have time. the kids will interrupt you and make your learning more difficult than necessary. Before long, you will learn how to work around all of that.

I'm making foccacia right now for my mom's Valentine's Day supper club. About to head back home for a fold.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
So 3 feedings in a row, i've had signs of strong fermentation. The rise is 3 to 4 times the original size. The sort of sour smell i was getting before i had a rise, is more "bready" with a tiny hint of acidity. I think i'll continue feeding twice a day through the weekend, then put in the fridge sunday night, then feed once/week. Then, in 2 weeks, i'll take the starter out on a wednesday, and begin double feeding again to wake the starter up in hopes of baking that weekend. Or, i'll reduce my hydration and just feed once/day, which is more maneagable than twice/day.

I'll try the float test this sunday as well, and see how i do.
This post was edited on 2/14 at 8:04 am


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
8305 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
You can feed it once a day 50g each of flour and water. A starter is a pretty durable once you get it going.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
35950 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

You can feed it once a day 50g each of flour and water. A starter is a pretty durable once you get it going.



Good, because feeding it 100g flour every feeding, twice a day, has dwindled my flour supply.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
No need to keep a large volume seed culture. If you need lots, you build it as necessary.
I made non sourdough burger buns this AM, with some potato flour. Excellent texture, soft without being squishy.


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
19757 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
quote:

Good, because feeding it 100g flour every feeding, twice a day, has dwindled my flour supply.


Congrats on now buying 10 lbs of flour every time you go to the store now.


BlackCoffeeKid
LSU Fan
Thibodaux/Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2016
5955 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
My starter Joey Doughrrow is coming along nicely.
Pretty rye talent at the moment, but I think he'll rise to the occasion soon.


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tewino
Member since Aug 2009
749 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread

Ive been making sourdough for a few years now and I'm hooked, but 2 questions:

1. How can I make a baguette or batard with a good crispy crust without using my Dutch oven? I don't want to do the "add water to the preheated pan and mist the loaf" thing. That's too messy. All I do is make round breads that fit in the Dutch oven. I would like to make something long like a French baguette with a good crust but that won’t fit in the Dutch oven.

2. How can I make my sourdough more acidic or tangy or sour? I know the bacteria are regional and once you move a starter from San Francisco for example the local bacteria will take over. It sure would be nice to make sourdough that tastes like San Francisco sourdough but that apparently is impossible.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
10461 posts

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Baguette crust requires steam. Commercial bakeries use steam injected ovens. So if using a pan on the floor of the oven full of lava rocks or a wet towel, or any of the dozens of other ways to generate steam are too much trouble for ya, you might want to try using the oblong lidded granite ware roasting pan, about $30. It will trap steam like a Dutch oven, but allow for 2-3 oblong loaves. Or, spring for a fancy Emile Henry lidded three baguette baking dish, $100.

More tangy sourdough is easy: use warmer water to mix the dough, keep the bulk ferment at a higher temp (not fridge, but a warm proof), and use some rye and whole wheat. Nice article on making a sour more or less acidic: LINK


BlackCoffeeKid
LSU Fan
Thibodaux/Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2016
5955 posts
 Online 

re: Making Artisanal Bread
Trying to make my first sourdough loaf today.

If I can get Imgur to work I'll post some pics, but it hasn't been working for me lately.


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