Posted by
Message
KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I think this might be the Year of the Bread on the FDB. Maybe I'll inspire a few other to begin their own starters. I've been meaning to do it for a while now, but now is the day.


I got this container off Amazon: LINK


I'm using this recipe:

King Arthur Flour

quote:

Combine 4 ounces (1 cup) whole rye flour (pumpernickel) or whole wheat flour with 4 ounces (1/2 cup) non-chlorinated cool water in a non-reactive container. Glass, crockery, stainless steel, or food-grade plastic all work fine for this.
Note that whole grain flour (whole wheat or rye) is used at the beginning of the process. This is because whole grains contain more nutrients and sourdough-friendly microorganisms than all-purpose flour.
You also may have better results if you feed your starter with non-chlorinated cool water; from now on, we’ll refer to this simply as “water.”
Stir everything together thoroughly; make sure there’s no dry flour anywhere. Cover the container loosely and let the mixture sit at warm room temperature (about 70°F) for 24 hours.




It was less wet than I thought it would be, seemed a bit dense. Does it get looser the more it is aged and fed? Or did I mess up already?
This post was edited on 2/11 at 2:10 pm


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8488 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Nope...you did fine. It's fine to stir it a few times during the 24 hrs, just so you can see how the texture changes.

Be aware that many, many, many people have encountered difficulty with a plain water & flour starter. A crafty microbiologist from St Louis (IIRC) figured out that starters that *looked* bubbly but failed to raise bread were being colonized by leuconostoc bacteria, which was crowding out the yeast. She determined that if the starter is acidic, the yeast will thrive over the leuconostoc....so she advises to spike the culture w/pineapple juice during the initial mix.

Your jar is nice, but I prefer a straight-sided (no narrowed neck or opening) 4-cup measure w/plastic lid to store my starter. It's easier to tell how much you have & whether it is doubling, thanks to the measuring lines on the side. Something like this: LINK


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I have a dry erase marker to gauge the growth.

I don't have pineapple juice. Any thing else?


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8488 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Orange juice will work, too, according to Debra Wink, the aforementioned microbiologist. Read here for a nice description of what's happening in a starter as it, well, "starts": LINK


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
We'll see how my first attempt goes, and I'll try that method if I fail.


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
7774 posts
 Online 

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I had one going in 3 days using the following steps:

Day 1 - Mix 20g flour and 20g water in a glass jar and leave loosely covered at room temp.
Day 2 - Add 40g flour and 40g water to the above and stir to combine. (You should start seeing some signs of life)
Day 3 - Add 80g flour and 80g water and stir to combine. (It should be actively bubbling).

After that discard half and start up a regular feeding schedule using 20g/20g everyday, discarding as needed, and you should have a starter ready to go in a couple of days. I store mine in the refrigerator so after I use my levain, I feed 50g/50g and put back in the fridge until I'm ready to use it the following week.

ETA There's a ton of info out there about using different varieties of flour to feed your starter. I think I started with a combo of AP and Bread but now I just mix up whatever I'm baking with so there's a variety of white, red and rye flours in there. I wouldn't overthink it. Good Luck!
This post was edited on 2/5 at 4:02 pm


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Put together a levain of 4oz starter, 4 oz water, 4 oz wheat flour.

That's just the usual starter feeding. Will this work as a levain for the FSWY recipe?

I just got the book and it's not what he recommends. I have things cue'd up and I'm gonna throw it together tonight and tomorrow and see what happens.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
GRTiger
USA Fan
On a roof eating alligator pie
Member since Dec 2008
47076 posts
 Online 

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
quote:

I think this might be the Year of the Bread on the FDB.


I started keto this year


Image: https://abovethelaw.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/08/Debbie-Downer-Rachel-Dratch-300x204.png


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I've done keto too. I need to get back to it. I just love bread and now I'm really into making my own


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Sidenote, I water tested my starter/levain and it briefly floated. I don't think it's active enough yet.

Gonna hold off on the levain, and make a pre-fermented overnight with instant dry yeast instead.

Sourdough will have to wait a bit longer


TigerFanatic99
Chicago Cubs Fan
South Bend, Indiana
Member since Jan 2007
12164 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
That's smart. I tried using my starter today before it was ready and the dough had absolutely no rise, and was just extremely, extremely dense after the bake. It's just solid cooked dough. You dont want that. I think tomorrow would be the right day to use it.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8488 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Nothing wrong with commercial yeast.....a long, slow cold bulk rise (in the fridge overnight) will allow the dough to develop lots of flavor from secondary fermentation. Not quite sourdough, but full flavored and wheat.

I baked some Forkish style 10% whole wheat loaves with pecans this week. Delicious.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I'm using the FSWY "White Bread with Poolish" and letting it ferment on the counter for 12-14 hours but only used 1/8 tsp of yeast.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Checked on the poolish after 12 hours and I think it over fermented. It appeared to have dropped about an inch from its max height. I mixed the bulk to combine anyway, but not looking good.

Sad.
This post was edited on 2/11 at 8:23 am


Dam Guide
New Orleans Saints Fan
Nooga
Member since Sep 2005
11236 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I follow Alex French Guy's recipe and it came out fantastic.

LINK

He's doing a crossiant series right now, I definitely going to try it when he has a final recipe.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8488 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
It’s okay that the polish was a bit past its prime. Not ideal, but not terrible. It simply means that the yeast culture was out of fresh food. It doesn’t mean every single particle of yeast in the culture died.

One thing you’ll notice about the high hydration loaves is that they can appear slack and uninspiring, or under-risen....but they often have tremendous oven spring if you’re baking in a closed vessel. I’ve plopped many an uninspiring loaf into a Dutch oven and stuck it into the oven with low expectations, then lifted the lid 30 mins later to a beautiful loaf.

One thing to remember, when making a poolish or any other pre-ferment: ambient temp. If you’ve got marble countertops and an AC vent blowing right down on the mix, it will not ferment as quickly as something in a warmer spot: say, on top of the fridge, or next to the stove w/the halogen hood lights beating down. Forkish calls for mixing most of his stuff w/warm water (90 degrees), but I find this too warm in the summer in my kitchen. I go w/cooler water and a longer stretch & fold period before putting into the fridge overnight. I also adjust to using warmer water in fall/winter when my kitchen is 70 degrees or below. Remember, he’s baking in a production kitchen in the Pacific Northwest. A hardcore bread geek would tell you to take the temp of the flour as well as the water before mixing.....I fall on the side of “eh, close enough” and accept some variations in the results.

I usually bake everything, even what looks like a ruined mess. Often even those are edible. At the very least, they can feed the birds or go into the compost pile.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
We have snow on the ground, so I figured I would be fine waiting to check at the lowest end of his recommended fremented-ness. I was wrong Oh well.

I have butcher block countertops, and the heat was on 71 degrees. I'll know for next time to check before the 12 hour mark.

I'm using a 5qt dutch oven which isn't optimal apparently, so I may end up with a flat tight crumb, but we'll see Just got finished folding it, and it's finishing the bulk ferment now for another hour. We'll see how it turns out


Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
7774 posts
 Online 

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
What's FSWY??


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61993 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8488 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Take some time to shape it properly—-divide it (if needed), roughly shape into a round. Then let it rest for 20 mins....and shape into a tighter round. Look at a couple of videos on shaping a boule if you haven’t done this before. Proper, tight shaping helps with oven spring and shape....lazy, haphazard shaping is a contributing factor in flat loaves.


first pageprev pagePage 1 of 8next pagelast page

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram