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tigerpawl
LSU Fan
Can't get there from here.
Member since Dec 2003
16605 posts

The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
Image: https://i.imgur.com/19hjoZt.jpg


The 'Shopping Cart Theory'... return it to the cart stand or abandon it.
Not sure why I picked the Poly Board to post this. Seems somehow related to the mishmash going on over the last month. I don't consider myself a sky-screamer or tree-hugger. However, this article resonates with me because I always make it a point to return my cart to the cart stand - mainly as an outward sign to differentiate myself from unambitious knuckle-draggers who perpetually take the path of least resistance. I do think we really are connected to each other at some basic societal level and have a corresponding responsibility to at least do our parts, even though they seem insignificant. Here's the article below (and link).

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The 'Shopping Cart Theory' supposedly determines who is a good person and who isn't.
The viral "Shopping Cart Theory" proposes that an individual's moral character can be determined by whether they choose to return a shopping cart to its designated spot or not.


There's no better time than right now to have an existential crisis and Twitter has found just the perfect way to go down that classic rabbit hole. A tweet by a user named Jared that describes a supposedly character-defining theory took the microblogging platform by storm this week as Twitterati discussed the nuances of the scenario presented. The viral "Shopping Cart Theory" proposes that an individual's moral character can be determined by whether they choose to return a shopping cart to its designated spot after use or whether they simply leave it wherever it suits them.

"The shopping cart is the ultimate litmus test for whether a person is capable of self-governing, the post states. To return the shopping cart is an easy, convenient task and one which we all recognize as the correct, appropriate thing to do. To return the shopping cart is objectively right. There are no situations other than dire emergencies in which a person is not able to return their cart. Simultaneously, it is not illegal to abandon your shopping cart. Therefore the shopping cart presents itself as the apex example of whether a person will do what is right without being forced to do it."

The author of The Shopping Cart Theory continues, "No one will punish you for not returning the shopping cart, no one will fine you, or kill you for not returning the shopping cart, you gain nothing by returning the shopping cart. You must return the shopping cart out of the goodness of your own heart. You must return the shopping cart because it is the right thing to do. Because it is correct." The theoretician then goes on to make some rather radical statements about those who do not pass The Shopping Cart test. "A person who is unable to do this is no better than an animal, an absolute savage who can only be made to do what is right by threatening them with a law and the force that stands behind it," they state.

"The Shopping Cart is what determines whether a person is a good or bad member of society," the theory concludes. Although at face value, The Shopping Cart Theory might come across as an extreme mode of judging one's character, and it takes on a different meaning when you equate it with those who strictly follow social distancing measures for the safety and wellbeing of every member of society and those who are willing to toss the vulnerable aside.

After tossing a multitude of arguments and counter-arguments, the majority on Twitter voted in agreement with the theory, with many retail workers presenting their personal experiences to make the case. Twitter user @THEheadhunter44 wrote: This is true. I'm the cart guy at a grocery store and I can confirm that I look down at you when I see you abandon the carts. Please for the love of God and man and all that is right with the world RETURN YOUR CART. YOU'RE NOT HELPING ANYTHING BY DITCHING IT! PLEASE! Another user @mercedestractor tweeted: I worked at a grocery store in the past and you’d be absolutely shocked at how many people don’t. Even worse often they’ll like kick it up on the curb so it doesn’t roll away, meaning they literally put effort into not returning it.

Meanwhile, some users pointed out that returning a shopping cart—although a simple enough job to most—might be a bigger deal for those with disabilities or those suffering from chronic illness or pain.

Unsurprisingly there were some pompous souls who claimed to leave the carts anywhere but the designated spots to give retail workers more work and thereby—by their uninformed and entitled logic—more income.

So what do you think? Is The Shopping Cart Theory an efficient gauge of someone's moral character?


OleWarSkuleAlum
Alabama Fan
Huntsville, AL
Member since Dec 2013
10293 posts
 Online 

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
frick no I just pop the front two wheels onto the curbing so it doesn’t roll away.


Turbeauxdog
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2004
18684 posts
 Online 

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
It’s obviously a sign of character.


dhuck20
Georgia Fan
SCLSU Fan
Member since Oct 2012
11820 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
quote:

frick no I just pop the front two wheels onto the curbing so it doesn’t roll away.



quote:

"...Even worse often they’ll like kick it up on the curb so it doesn’t roll away, meaning they literally put effort into not returning it."


This post was edited on 6/29 at 8:17 am


Hoops
Bowling Green Fan
LA
Member since Jan 2013
4809 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
Anything that benefits someone else with no direct benefit of their own exposes people. This is a good example, holding doors, giving up a seat in a crowded room/bus/subway, etc.


Gusoline
Auburn Fan
Jacksonville, NC
Member since Dec 2013
6684 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I return mine, grab others on the way, and belittle people who i see leaving theirs. It's more about my hate of laziness.

I'm a right leaning centrist.

ETA for post above. I hold doors if they're within a few feet but if it takes longer than 5 seconds they're on their own.
This post was edited on 6/29 at 8:19 am


UcobiaA
Alabama Fan
The Gump
Member since Nov 2010
1157 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I saw a Dollar General shopping cart about 200 yards away in another lot behind a Dairy Queen. Got me wondering if there is a serial killer loose.

Generally I agree with the theory. The health issues reason for not returning them is valid. And there are times when the little cart corral is full so I could see why someone wouldn't bother taking it there. I can't really easily recall ever seeing anyone abandon one, which is odd because I see them all over parking lots.


ChineseBandit58
LSU Fan
west of the pines
Member since Aug 2005
31543 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
It is certainly an indicator - perhaps because I pass this test - I have always returned the cart to a safe area - sometimes not in the designated spot but certainly out of the way of any traffic or pedestrian path.

I recently got caught in a store when a raging thunderstorm erupted - I had just bought a new Subaru (still less than 200 mile on it) and had parked it far off in the parking lot to avoid the "new car parking lot rash"

My umbrella was left in the car. I ran thru the rain and when I got there, I pushed the cart over next to the big concrete base for the lighting instead of all the way to a designated spot.

I've always conducted my life based on doing what I wish honorable people would do in any situation.


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BamaFinland
Alabama Fan
Lahti, Finland
Member since Oct 2015
1683 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
In the past I think I mostly put the back unless it was super far away to return. But since I've lived overseas everyone takes them back except the Gypsy and Muslim people, and so I would hate to lose my white privileges card, so I put them back.


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Powerman
LSU Fan
Durham, NC
Member since Jan 2004
146042 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I always return the cart

Not because I'm a great person. I have just gotten in the habit of parking close to the cart stations so I don't forget where I park.


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geauxbrown
Southern Fan
Louisiana
Member since Oct 2006
8289 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I do return the cart...even though I dislike doing so.


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ApexTiger
LSU Fan
cary nc
Member since Oct 2003
44491 posts
 Online 

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
quote:

"...Even worse often they’ll like kick it up on the curb so it doesn’t roll away, meaning they literally put effort into not returning it."


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FooManChoo
Georgia Fan
Member since Dec 2012
29233 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
Moral character is defined by God, the only objective source for moral reasoning.

This theory is nothing more than arbitrariness. Morality without God is merely personal opinion that is neither better nor worse than any other’s opinion.


tigerpawl
LSU Fan
Can't get there from here.
Member since Dec 2003
16605 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
quote:

I return mine, grab others on the way,
I'll often offer people I pass nearby to put it back for them. I love watching their eyes light up. I think we're all hardwired to hope for random acts of kindness from others.


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80
Snazzmeister
Georgia Fan
IHTFP
Member since Jan 2015
630 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I think there's absolutely truth to it. Growing up in a small town in the south, everyone returned their cart with the exception being the vagrants who stole them to haul all their crap around town. The first time I'd ever seen someone not return a cart was when I was in college but even then it seemed somewhat rare with only 1 or 2 abandoned carts in the parking lot at any given time. It seems to have just gotten worse with time. I could head to my local Publix right now and find at least 20 carts in the parking lot. Some of that is probably accounted for by people seeing other people not returning them but there's definitely a correlation between people's growing desire for more big government and refusal to return their carts. Oh, and the "pain and disability" excuse doesn't really work at Publix. They'll take your stuff out to your car for you if you need it.


LetTheTigerOut
Member since Dec 2019
128 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character


This post was edited on 7/1 at 6:06 pm


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tigerpawl
LSU Fan
Can't get there from here.
Member since Dec 2003
16605 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
quote:

It seems to have just gotten worse with time.
This is very telling and relevant. The camel stuck his nose under the tent a long time ago - with no push-back. It reveals the glacier-like "Political Creep" that the Dems rely on so much. Inch by inch...


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La Place Mike
LSU Fan
West Florida Republic
Member since Jan 2004
23309 posts
 Online 

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
Yes, I return the cart. I am not a debased cretin.


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Pussykat
LSU Fan
South Louisiana
Member since Oct 2016
3889 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
quote:

parking close to the cart stations so I don't forget where I park.


Smart


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wareaglepete
Auburn Fan
Essential Land
Member since Dec 2012
4240 posts

re: The 'Shopping Cart Theory' and moral character
I roll it down the hill so Bubbles can get it.


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