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SirSaintly
New Orleans Saints Fan
Uptown, New Orleans
Member since Feb 2013
3007 posts

How Much Should Removing A Load Bearing Wall Cost?

The wall between my living room and kitchen is load bearing. I'd like to open it up (not remove wall completely, but make a big pass thru with bar height counter). This wall is about 8' long and some of that doesn't have a stud already b/c there is a pocket door.

I got a quote from a "load bearing wall removal specialist" who quoted me a little over $10k. This includes removing existing sheetrock, reframing the space for the pass thru and installing a beam across the header for support. That's it.

I'll still need to get a sheetrock guy to finish the job and then counter guy etc.

This quote seems a little high to me for such a small span.

Anyone had this done?

ETA: Want finished product to look something like this:
This post was edited on 4/5 at 6:53 am


Johnpettigrew
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since Sep 2017
1168 posts

Way too expensive especially if not completing the Sheetrock work. I just doubled my kitchen by taking down a wall that size that led to a dining room we never used. Cost me about $120 in materials to install a non visable beam in my attic. 2- 2x12x12, sheet of 1/2 plywood, loctite, and 12- 5” 3/4 bolts and hardware.


Clint Torres
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Oct 2011
2333 posts

If you’re putting a beam in, why not take out the entire wall?


fishfighter
LSU Fan
RIP
Member since Apr 2008
40026 posts

A lot depends on the framing above and how to tie everything in. There is no way on giving a price without a full inspection.


wickowick
LSU Fan
Head of Island
Member since Dec 2006
44688 posts

quote:

A lot depends on the framing above and how to tie everything in. There is no way on giving a price without a full inspection.


This


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BottomlandBrew
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2010
24773 posts

$10k sounds like a "I don't want this job" price.

I was quoted $3600 to take out a 12' section of wall, finish the drywall, move two outlets, and repair the floor transition. I thought it was a fair price in our market, but more than I wanted to spend.

DIYed it for a about $500. The most expensive part was the long piece of oak I had to buy to make the floor transition. That unfinished piece cost more than the LVL beams.

I was lucky because it ran through the middle of the house and that spine did not take a lot of weight from the roof. It essentially held the up attic joists. Also where I was tying the verticals in to the floor I had brick foundations directly beneath both spots. That helped me as I didn't have to reinforce anything down in my crawlspace. The local lumber supplier ran the calcs for me.

The hardest part was getting the beam up there with my wife. I suggest a strong friend help rather than your wife. We almost died. It was fun. I also learned that mudding drywall is harder than it looks. Respect to those guys who can do it well.

Final picture is about 90% done. Still some caulking and painting to do.







This post was edited on 5/10 at 7:53 am


ScaryClown
Member since Nov 2016
5847 posts

Take out the whole wall


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mdomingue
LSU Fan
Lafayette, LA
Member since Nov 2010
16019 posts
 Online 

Seems pretty expensive to me. We redid out entire kitchen. took out 2 load bearing walls and replaced one with a support header built into the attic and one with a header that was framed and sheetrocked. That costs us in the neighborhood of 50K and included new cabinets, an island, granite countertops, travertine flooring sheetrock, electrical, plumbing and painting. Turnkey price except I contracted my own countertop guy (about 4K of the total), the primary contractor subbed the rest for me.

If your space and layout allow, I would suggest rethinking the pass through and consider opening it up completely and putting an island where the pass through would have been. It gives a more open feel and allows for better flow in and out of the kitchen area. It's what we did and don't regret it for a second.

That will run a little more if you go to the walls and ceiling because you'll have to blend into the two rooms. WHere we transitioned form the kitchen/dining to the living room we left a small stub wall on each end and framed above the opening with a header similar to below without the arc. That allowed for a visual break in the two rooms but still maintained a very open feel.




Good luck


ETA, price was in 2013 and also included demo and removal of old ceramic tile.
This post was edited on 4/5 at 8:42 am


mdomingue
LSU Fan
Lafayette, LA
Member since Nov 2010
16019 posts
 Online 

I'm also curious how you came to the conclusion it is load bearing wall?


ScaryClown
Member since Nov 2016
5847 posts

Very nice man! Good look


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Cdawg
Houston Astros Fan
TigerFred's Living Room
Member since Sep 2003
57200 posts

That;s an awesome map. I remember that Louisiana map from social studies in 6th grade.


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SirSaintly
New Orleans Saints Fan
Uptown, New Orleans
Member since Feb 2013
3007 posts

quote:

If you’re putting a beam in, why not take out the entire wal


I just wanted the pass through setup figuring it would be easier than removing the whole wall, since I would just be installing a breakfast bar type thing there anyway. The contractor quoted the addition of beam. I don't know anything about this stuff, so assumed that was normal. Do I not need a beam to bear the load if building a pass thru?


SirSaintly
New Orleans Saints Fan
Uptown, New Orleans
Member since Feb 2013
3007 posts

quote:


I'm also curious how you came to the conclusion it is load bearing wall?


Went into attic and see joists resting on that wall. Also had a retired architect neighbor confirm


jmon
USA Fan
Mandeville, LA
Member since Oct 2010
6176 posts

That guy is trying to rip you off. The way the poster Bottomlandbrew did his is the exact same way we did ours. Opened up a wall that had a cased opening and roughly doubled the size of the cased opening. Materials were around $600 when all said, opening went from 5' to 12' cased opening. Placed a frame support on both sides of wall ceilings, cut out sheet rock, cut out framing, installed king studs, made a header out of 2 @ 2X12 with a piece of 3/4" plywood in between to make header lighter. Placed header on top of studs, removed a frame support, cut and installed new sheetrock, and floated. Installed casing. Sanding and texture next day, paint and complete in two days work. Spent the next day installing a 5" transition strip of red oak stained to match floors. Three days work. Quote I received was $4,500 from a contractor.


SirSaintly
New Orleans Saints Fan
Uptown, New Orleans
Member since Feb 2013
3007 posts

quote:

That guy is trying to rip you off. The way the poster Bottomlandbrew did his is the exact same way we did ours.


What type of tradesman should I contact for just removing the wall? I figured since it's just a small job I would contract it myself. A framer? I know a good sheetrock guy. Can paint and install cabinet for countertop myself. Would have countertop installed. I'm not competent enough to do the framing myself and I don't want my roof to cave in.


mdomingue
LSU Fan
Lafayette, LA
Member since Nov 2010
16019 posts
 Online 

quote:

Went into attic and see joists resting on that wall.


That's generally a dead give away.


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modes
Member since May 2017
175 posts

Depends where the current header or beam is supported. If it is running from end to end on that wall, then you likely don't need to remove it.

Really have to open the wall up on one side to see.


mikie421
LSU Fan
continental shelf
Member since Nov 2008
584 posts
 Online 

I’ll just had an 8 foot section of wall removed to expand an opening to 18 feet. Removed existing header and replaced with 18’ x 20” LVL beam.
Contractor charged me $2700. Did not include any finish work/Sheetrock, since I’m doing that myself.

I also had an engineer come out and spec the beam just to sure it was the right size. That was $450.
This post was edited on 4/5 at 11:25 am


SirSaintly
New Orleans Saints Fan
Uptown, New Orleans
Member since Feb 2013
3007 posts

quote:

Contractor charged me $2700.


That's about what I was expecting, so $10k seemed high. You just chose a regular contractor? I'm hoping just removing a wall isn't too small a job for the ones around here. Getting skilled people to do small jobs around here is becoming difficult since there's so much work


wickowick
LSU Fan
Head of Island
Member since Dec 2006
44688 posts

I would recommend go a local lumber store and explaining to the sales desk what you are looking to do and ask if they know anyone in the area that could handle a small job like this.


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