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NCTiger2
Member since Jun 2021
484 posts

Medical Device Sales

Any advice for someone looking to get into medical device sales?


DRTiger67
LSU Fan
New Orleans, La
Member since Apr 2013
392 posts

Actually attended Medical Sales College in Littleton CO. Tough field to get established in but very lucrative once you biuld relationships with doctors or hospitals/clinics. Make sure you feel comfortable selling. Good luck.


Carson123987
Texas Fan
Middle Court at the Rec
Member since Jul 2011
65395 posts

Be young and handsome


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140
Mingo Was His NameO
LSU Fan
Brooklyn
Member since Mar 2016
23392 posts

Get some bolt ons and be willing to "go the extra mile"


Roy Curado
Member since Jul 2021
241 posts

Blonde with blue eyes and can talk to surgeons.


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

Sales experience is a must. I did insurance/finance for yearly 8 years before I got in. Unless you can find an associate role that is willing to take a shot or you know someone, it's nearly impossible to break in.

I got an associate role that I was in for a year and a half before being promoted. I'm on my second position now.

I also attended Medical Sales College back in 2016. I think that is a great route for the right person. Again, I had sales experience prior to going there so even though device sales is a completely different ball game, I had already had success selling. Sales is hard and a lot of people can't cut it. I believe Medical Sales College is what ultimately got me my first job in device.

Ask any other questions you may have. I absolutely love this industry.


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

quote:

Blonde with blue eyes and can talk to surgeons.


There are a handful of females in this industry but most reps are male.


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50
NCTiger2
Member since Jun 2021
484 posts

Thanks for the info! I have been in insurance for a year (I’m only 25) and I just sit in an office all day. I’d really like to get out and experience other things and obviously the potential pay isn’t bad. Just curious, what’s your typical day look like and how is your work/life balance?


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

Depending on the product and field you go in, the day to day will vary. I got an associate role with Stryker in the reconstruction/joint replacement division selling total hip and knee replacements. Majority of my time was running instrument trays to be processed for surgeries or being in the operating room covering surgeries. As an associate, they don't ask you to sell too much but spend your time learning the instruments and implants. It's up at 5:00 am and home at 5-6:00 pm on a good day. Some days you may not be home until much later. And then if you're on a call, its a crapshoot. Work life balance with them was dog shite. We had a fairly big team so I was on call every 4th week and then we split up holidays. If you have a family, it can wear you down.

Now I work in spine/pain. I have non-emergent, elective cases that take maybe half an hour. I spend majority of my days in physicians clinics, whether presenting my product/implant with potential physicians, or discussing current patients with current using physicians. The other part I am in cases provide support. Work life balance is perfect where I am now and I am making much more money than I was at Stryker.

Each field of medicine will have a different day to day. I have big respect for the people that can do ortho trauma as they don't know what each day will bring and they have to find a way to make that and family time work. No way I could do it and I will do something else before I go back to ortho. Like I said, I love what I do now and enjoy being in the operating room helping patients.
This post was edited on 6/30 at 3:52 pm


NCTiger2
Member since Jun 2021
484 posts

Your current job sounds like the dream. I am looking to start a family in the next few years so that work life balance is important but also is making some money haha. What do you think the best way to get into a field like what you’re doing now is? And thanks again!


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jfw3535
Bradley Fan
South of Bunkie
Member since Mar 2008
3112 posts

Bigger implants.


DandyPimp
LSU Fan
New Orleans
Member since Jan 2007
1049 posts

My understanding is that it is not as lucrative as it once was - I.e early 2000s. One of my fraternity brothers that was in right after college absolutely slayed it in his 20s (was bringing in $600-700k) but said it’s not as good now


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

quote:

What do you think the best way to get into a field like what you’re doing now is?


I wish there was an answer to this. I paid my dues in ortho grinding out the long days, weekends, and holidays. Doing that made myself a much better candidate to hiring managers and recruiters. My advice now is to absolutely crush it in your current job. You need recognition and awards. These medical device companies are not going to hire someone because they may have potential; there's too much on the line. They want someone with a track record. Not to say you can't luck out and find a spot, but it's rare.

One thing you can do is utilize LinkedIn. Connect with hiring managers, recruiters, reps, etc. in the industry and ask for advice and what they are looking for in someone wanting to get their foot in the door. When I got back from Medical Sales College, I did this every single day. That type of activity can lead to good things. I'm proof.


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30
Mingo Was His NameO
LSU Fan
Brooklyn
Member since Mar 2016
23392 posts

quote:

My understanding is that it is not as lucrative as it once was - I.e early 2000s. One of my fraternity brothers that was in right after college absolutely slayed it in his 20s (was bringing in $600-700k) but said it’s not as good now


I know for a fact people are making that much or more now. You just cant bribe the doctors anymore, which is a good thing


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42
Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

quote:

My understanding is that it is not as lucrative as it once was - I.e early 2000s. One of my fraternity brothers that was in right after college absolutely slayed it in his 20s (was bringing in $600-700k) but said it’s not as good now



It's definitely not like it was back then. I've heard stories of reps taking doctors to Switzerland for a week and running up huge bills with skiing, dinners, whores, you name it. That doesn't exist anymore. But this industry is still VERY lucrative if you're good at it.


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21
Tomcat
LSU Fan
1825 Tulane
Member since Nov 2004
435 posts

I had never heard of these medical sales colleges before. This might be a good option for my son. He goes to a good school and is a college athlete. Assuming these factors combined would make him an attractive candidate to these companies if these colleges are truly mined by the companies listed on their site.

Do they want someone to go there once they have some sales experience or do they go right after college?

Are three listed placement statistics legit?

How do the companies that hire in this field look at these colleges?


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

Being a college athlete is a plus, especially for a company like Stryker. When I went to training for Stryker, I was one of like 7 out of probably 20 that wasn't a college athlete. Had a couple dudes that had a cup of coffee in the NFL, minor league ball, pro golfers, etc. That will definitely help.

In regards to Medical Sales College, I had some people straight out of college and some people that were in their 50s when I was there. They will work with people on their sales skills but when people ask me if they should go, I'm always hesitant to tell them yes. As I mentioned previously, not everyone is cut out to be in sales. It is a big commitment to do the course. When I went, they had a 6 week and 12 week course and you were there on "campus" (which was just a building with a few rooms) the whole time. You had to pay for your hotel room that whole duration and the cost of the course. It's a big commitment with your time and financially. I think they have online courses and hybrid courses now, but I wanted to be there and get the hands on experience. They also took us to hospitals that let us be in the OR to watch cases.

When I left there, I thought the statistics they put on their website were bull shite. I know a lot of people in my class that never got placed, but I think that is their fault. They will give you the tools and help you once you leave, but it's mostly up to the individual to land interviews. Like I told the OP, when I got back home, I was on LinkedIn and other medical sales websites (most have to pay for a subscription) and connecting with every person I could and messaging them. I applied to every job I could find. Ultimately, I landed probably 4-5 interviews and had a couple of offers, with one being Stryker that I ended up taking.

I don't know how the companies look at Medical Sales College, honestly. It has grown tremendously since I was there, and I see on LinkedIn that they are still placing people in the industry.

Ultimately, I think it will be up to you and your son to decide if it's right for him. Do you think he can be successful in sales? If so, maybe dive into it. You can call and speak with them, but they will more than likely tell you what you want to hear so that he will enroll.


ColoradoAg03
Texas A&M Fan
Denver, CO
Member since Oct 2012
5478 posts
 Online 

A couple good buddies of mine work for Stryker down in the Ft Myers/Naples area and do very well for themselves (over $300k/yr). They call that area of Florida "Heaven's waiting room" lol. They've been doing it for a long time and neither went to any college for it. They both did something completely different before getting into it, never went to medical sales college, and never were college athletes. One of them never even graduated from college.
This post was edited on 7/1 at 8:44 am


Chuckiee
USA Fan
Member since Jan 2007
2419 posts

Medical Sales College isn't a requirement. Most people in the industry didn't go or don't know about it. It's probably only 10 years old.


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10
Chitown_Badger
Wisconsin Fan
A one drink walk from Wrigley
Member since May 2013
25984 posts

My ex girlfriend is in device sales for Medtronic. She had sales in her background for corporate telecom stuff early in her career and then went into nursing. So she had the clinical experience and the sales experience that she could spin into the medical device sales position. Was in a supporting role at Medtronic before moving to a full seller. When we split up I believe she was over $300k per year.

A couple thoughts:
- If you don't have a medical or clinical background it's going to be tough to get in
- A lot of the job (at least in her case) is actually being in procedures or surgeries and being a live consultant on how to use the device while the surgery is ongoing; to that end it could be really stressful
- The competence required for this kind of position is going to be 10x what would be required vs. just being a pharmaceutical rep, where you're glorified sample delivery and parroting the sales talking points you've been taught
- She was attractive, so that also helped

Have another good buddy who is not an attractive female but is really smart, funny, and gregarious. He's been with a couple smaller device companies in urology, and I think he recently landed a sweet gig where he's well over half a million per year.
This post was edited on 7/1 at 9:46 am


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