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Friedbrie
LSU Fan
Abita Springs
Member since Jun 2018
588 posts
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Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Today I threw soft platsic, spoon, at them, behind them, they would not bite. It was really frustrating because I took my 7 year old second time in a row and nothing. Hopefully he'll go with me again but I guess that's why they call it fishing. The tide was flat so there was essentially no water movement.


canyon
LSU Fan
Lower Keys/Coloweedo
Member since Dec 2003
11114 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
I always heard that. But you have disproven that old tale. Or, tail.


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30
Hog Zealot
USA Fan
On the Flats
Member since Mar 2012
1315 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
I wade and kayak fish a large flat for reds. I’ve had that experience a few times where the bait action wasn’t bringing them in.

Most of my successful bites on those types of fish are to throw my soft plastic way up in front of them and just let it sit on bottom. As they tail and work their way across the flat I’ll lightly twitch my bait on the bottom to kick up some mud/grass. For a fickle fish that subtle action brings it over for a look.

In my experience a tailing red is a feeding red but not always “aggressive” to a bite.


tke_swamprat
LSU Fan
Houma, LA
Member since Aug 2004
7097 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Did you throw a top water? Sometimes that will get them. Frog, rat, she dog.


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nahtanojc
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2006
895 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
It can sometimes be tough to get a railing red to bite... especially if all they are focused on is what is right in front of them. Best tactic I’ve found in that scenario is to cast out in front and just wait for it to get to you, then twitch the bait.
Buggs lures work great for this, as do jerk shads.

Easiest ones to catch are when they’re prowling the grass line and busting bait... you can see where they are, which direction they’re headed and they eat practically anything


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10
AlxTgr
LSU Fan
Kyre Banorg
Member since Oct 2003
67533 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
quote:

a feeding red
Is there any other kind?


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12
DownshiftAndFloorIt
LSU Fan
Here
Member since Jan 2011
54313 posts
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re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Sometimes I think they just have their face stuck in the mud and arent paying attention to anything.



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20
lsuson
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
7434 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Tailing red usually means they are digging on the bottom for crustaceans etc. They are looking down and not up. So if you throw a fast moving bait like a spoon a lot of times they won’t hit it. Also if that bait hits them without them seeing it will spook them and they take off. What I found that works well is a crawfish fished weedless and minimal weight. Pitch it out in front and reel toward them and let it sink just in front. You can jig it slightly and many times they will crush it.


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Dock Holiday
Member since Sep 2015
1021 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Seeing some of a tail out of the water does not 100% of the time mean a red is eating. I've seen them countless times slowly cruising shallow flats with only a tip of the tail sticking up as it patrols. Reds get lock jaw like any other fish, but just not nearly as often.
A red feeding in one spot with tail up and nose pointed down means you need to drop a bait in front his nose


Ol boy
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2018
660 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
quote:

The tide was flat so there was essentially no water movement.


Guide buddy of mine explained it best. “Reds feed on the tide, imagine eating all you can eat steak and walking outside and someone throws you a bologna sammich”
A few hours later that same sandwich would get smashed..


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22
Me Bite
LSU Fan
A.K.A. - Bite Me
Member since Oct 2007
6971 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
No water movement was the problem. For the most part a tailing (moving) redfish is hunting for his meal.


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EveryoneGetsATrophy
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2017
1558 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Next time throw a gulp in front of him and twitch it a little.


commode
New Orleans Saints Fan
North Shore
Member since Dec 2012
624 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Not here to help with tailing aspect but the 7 year old. Bring some dead shrimp and let him catch a few, then switch over to chasing on the flats. it is hard enough to get kids into the outdoors but it is real hard to keep them interested if you continue to strike out. Good luck on getting it figured out.


Friedbrie
LSU Fan
Abita Springs
Member since Jun 2018
588 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
quote:

Next time throw a gulp in front of him and twitch it a little.


I had a whole new pack of gulp shrimp penny but my boy took all of them out to play with them after our last trip which I didn't realize until 8:30 last night. Damn Walmart with those Corona hours. I should've picked up some dead bait on the way. I can't get the redfish tail and fin images off my brain. I just wanted my boy to see his first redfish landed.
This post was edited on 5/4 at 3:56 pm


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Friedbrie
LSU Fan
Abita Springs
Member since Jun 2018
588 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
quote:

 it is hard enough to get kids into the outdoors but it is real hard to keep them interested if you continue to strike out


That is what's making it the worst for me right now.


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00
hall59tiger
mandeville
Member since Oct 2013
291 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
You fishing around lafitte? I heard there are so many shrimp in the marsh right now that the redfish arent too interested in artificial baits.


Friedbrie
LSU Fan
Abita Springs
Member since Jun 2018
588 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Fishing out of a canoe in Buras by Joshua's. I kayak (ride 135) mostly but have a 2 person canoe that I've taken my boy in twice in the last 2 weeks. I've never struck out twice in a row by Joshua's. That marsh is full of reds. I've definitely been noticing a lot more garfish and otters around there too.

Starting to feel like I'm gonna need to invest in a boat soon, especially once my 2 year old comes of age.


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TheCurmudgeon
LSU Fan
SE Louisiana
Member since Aug 2014
1331 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Their nose is in the mud so won't see a fast lure. I keep a vortex shad rigged weedless w no or maybe 1/8 oz weight ready most times. Drop it in front and past them, almost dead-stick slow retrieve usually keeps it in their way so they see it.


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bluemoons
New Orleans Saints Fan
the marsh
Member since Oct 2012
4436 posts

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
quote:

Seeing some of a tail out of the water does not 100% of the time mean a red is eating. I've seen them countless times slowly cruising shallow flats with only a tip of the tail sticking up as it patrols. Reds get lock jaw like any other fish, but just not nearly as often.
A red feeding in one spot with tail up and nose pointed down means you need to drop a bait in front his nose




This. ^^

Once you learn the fish's body language, you'll learn to distinguish with a pretty good degree of certainty between a tailing fish that's not feeding, and a tailing fish that's feeding. If you a see a redfish sporadically tailing, flicking his tail, and moving erratically, then he's probably feeding. If you see a redfish with his tail (or dorsal fin) out of the water consistently swimming, then he's probably just cruising around, not "tailing."

While a true "tailing" fish is most likely feeding, it doesn't mean they're easy to feed. As others have posted, in order to get a truly tailing fish to eat, you pretty much have to get a lure right in front of their nose without spooking them. This is difficult, particularly where there is grass involved. When a redfish (or any other shallow water fish) is actively tailing and eating, a lure 1' away might as well be a mile away.

eta: Are you trying to get him to sight fish? Or is he just coming along? You probably already know this, but sight fishing is definitely not the best pursuit for younger ones. The level of rod control, casting accuracy, and overall skill required to sight fish redfish is a bit beyond what most kids that age have. I say this not to be preachy but really just because I learned that the hard way and I regret not taking a more measured approach at getting a particular young kid involved in fishing.
This post was edited on 5/4 at 5:02 pm


Friedbrie
LSU Fan
Abita Springs
Member since Jun 2018
588 posts
 Online 

re: Does a tailing red always mean a feeding red?
Yeah, the tails and fins I saw were very slow. The fish were hardly moving, if any at all. There was a lot of grass I was up against too.

I was sight fishing. Definitely not the best for my little dude. He definitely enjoyed perch fishing with worms much more. If I can get him on a boat with some live bait I reckon that would be ideal.

quote:

I regret not taking a more measured approach at getting a particular young kid involved in fishing.


Did your kid lose interest?
This post was edited on 5/4 at 5:27 pm


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