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s14suspense
USA Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2007
14109 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Assuming you just use a litmus test?



With a PH meter. I initially used a super cheap one from Amazon >$20 but I don't know how accurate it was actually.

LINK

Something like that it probably a little more accurate.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
33855 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

With a PH meter.


I've got one, i just hate using that damn thing. I bought a fairly decent one for about $35-$40. I just hate having to calibrate the damn thing before every measurement. I'm to the point now of only measuring the ph for my sours during my first readings. After that, the beer is going to do what it is going to do. I can measure the acidity, but i can't do much about it from there.
I do use it regularly with quick sours though. It's vital for pre-acidifying and seeing how low your pH is before you boil off the bacteria.


The Estimator
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
New Orleans
Member since Jul 2012
1161 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
I plan on getting one for mash pH readings, but I’m sort of the opposite of you. I care more about the mash pH being right than my kettle sours pre-souring. I pre-acidify before kettle souring by adding 5mL Lactic to the Kettle just before I pitch my Lacto pl. I figure that gets me damn near the 4.5 I’m looking to have it start at to reduce other bugs taking over. It gets boiled post souring anyway and I just taste it until it reaches the desired sour level I’m looking for.

But yeah, GeauxPack, the salts you have shown are going to make a great New England. Any idea what hops you’re looking to use?


MountainTiger
LSU Fan
The Duchy of Grand Fenwick
Member since Dec 2008
11594 posts
 Online 

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
I'm sort of with Bug re: the pH meter. I bought one when I started doing all grain and it helped a lot at first when I was getting used to my water and my system. But once I had brewed enough beers of different types to know that my salt additions were doing what I wanted them to, it became more trouble than it was worth.

That said, I definitely think they're helpful when it comes to sours.


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GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
9259 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

But yeah, GeauxPack, the salts you have shown are going to make a great New England. Any idea what hops you’re looking to use?


Awesome. Brewersfriend made me nervous cause it gave me alot higher numbers than Bru'n Water, like 400 ppm for some salts. But I've heard not to use Brewersfriend for water adjustments.

Definitely want citra and galaxy in there, 3rd hop I am open to changing or even completely eliminating. I want to at least make one with some generic hops for the style before I start experimenting with them. So far here is my plan:

Boil:
1 oz Galaxy - 10 min
1 oz Citra - 10 min
Whirlpool:
1 oz Galaxy - 15 min starting at 175 degrees
1 oz Citra - 15 min starting at 175 degrees
1 oz Mosaic - 15 min starting at 175 degrees
Dryhop at 3 days:
1.5 oz Galaxy
1 oz Citra
1 oz Mosaic
Dryhop at 7 days:
1.5 oz Galaxy
1 oz Citra
1 oz Mosaic

Keg on day 10. Let me know what y'all think


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Bleed P&G
New Orleans Saints Fan
New Orleans
Member since Aug 2003
2834 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

I went with the NEEPAH which I’ve never tried, the AURORA, the ‘19 Solera, and the Saison Parfait.

I've used NEEPAH 3 times and find that it is just OK. My problem with it is that it over-attenuates, with my last two beers finishing at 1.008 and 1.007. I made a NEIPA about 3 weeks ago with 1318 and am much happier with this one.

However, I did jump on the pre-order bandwagon. I picked up the Saison Parfait, AURORA, OSLO, and Mad Fermentationist. The Mad Fermentationist is the only one that I have used in the past and find that it cranks out a nicely tart and mildy funky saison in about 3 months.

The AURORA and OSLO are interesting in that BB claims that no temperature control is needed.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
33855 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

I've used NEEPAH 3 times and find that it is just OK. My problem with it is that it over-attenuates, with my last two beers finishing at 1.008 and 1.007. I made a NEIPA about 3 weeks ago with 1318 and am much happier with this one.


I used NEEPAH for the first time about a month ago and it finished at 1.015, which was my target.

quote:

The AURORA and OSLO are interesting in that BB claims that no temperature control is needed.


Kveik strains. This is the new IT yeast in the "wild yeast" world. Super fast ferment at high temperatures with little to no off flavors. Plenty of people are going grain to glass in 3-4 days.
This post was edited on 3/14 at 12:48 pm


CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
47974 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Plenty of people are going grain to glass in 3-4 days.

assuming a quick force carb? hell it takes 24 hours to cool.


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BottomlandBrew
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2010
19806 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Plenty of people are going grain to glass in 3-4 days.


There's no way that beer can be that good, can there? Lord knows I've done enough stuff that goes against traditional protocol and still ended up with drinkable beer, so I'm not saying it can't be good, but I have my doubts. I'd need to try it to believe it.


BugAC
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Oct 2007
33855 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

There's no way that beer can be that good, can there?


People swear it's good. They say the earlier on it's a tad more sulphury (depending on the strain), but after a week or 2 it clears up. The strain is super aggressive. The milk the funk facebook page is inundated with Kveik posts to most users dismay, but it technically is a wild yeast.
There is also a kveik facebook page i'm a member of that is all kveik. Full attenuation in 2-3 days from what some people post. No temperature limitations. Some strains produce lager like clean beers.

Some have used it for clean beers and some for sours. Some strains are fruity, some are more towards the lager/sulfur like aromas. It's a wild, new to us strain, but the Scandinavians have been using them for a long time. They create Kveik rings, made of wood, that they dry the yeast onto the rings and dunk the rings into the unfermented wort. Guess that's why it's so hearty. I haven't used kveik yet. Once i move into the new house i'll give it a try.

Draftmag Article

Milk the Funk Wiki - Kveik

Lars Beer Blog

And there are 2 popular strains that are typically discussed. Hornindal and Sigmund's Voss

Sigmund's Voss Kveik

quote:

Sigmund's Voss Kveik yeast is a single strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from a sample of kveik generously provided by Sigmund Gjernes via Lars Garshol (click here for Lars' blog). Traditionally used in the production of Norwegian Farmhouse Ale, this strain is a fast fermenter with good attenuation, a light earthy spiciness, marked tartness and unique ester profile of orange peel. This strain is prone to forming incredibly large flocs unlike any other yeast we've seen before, yet still remains highly attenuative. Sigmund's Voss Kveik also exhibits the ability to ferment wort over a large temperature range, 70 - 100 ºF, without major changes to the flavor profile or production of any harsh phenolics or fusel alchohols. This yeast will exhibit a slightly more restrained ester profile and ferment a little slower at cooler fermentation temperatures, and quickly produce a drier beer with a slightly more pronounced ester profile at warmer fermentation temperatures. We highly recommend taking this into the high end of temperature range, 90-100 ºF.


Hornindal Kveik

quote:

A wonderfully unique Norwegian farmstead “kveik,” Hornindal produces a tropical flavor and complex aroma that can present itself as stonefruit, pineapple, and dried fruit leather, which complement fruit-forward hops. Add even more dimension to “C” hops and increase ester intensity with a high fermentation temperature. Ferments well at 90° F/32° C or higher. Non-phenolic and no fusels, even at higher temps.


Homebrewtalk post about it

quote:

I picked this yeast up in the spring and finally got around to brewing with it. I had a double brew session in which I brewed my Allgash-influenced Wit with my Belgian strain and then a Hoppy Session Pale with azacca, equinox & southern cross.

Super hot brew day and I was over it by the end of my second brew - put the pale ale in my SS Brewbucket at about 130 and let it chill in the basement for a couple hours. Pitched the Hornindal Kveik at I'd say 100-110 (didn't even take a temp reading but wanted to see what the yeast would do at a higher temp). Took off quickly and just chugged along for about 3-4 days.

Kegged the beer today and it brought it down to 1.008 - no off flavors at all and some great citrus notes (could be azacca influenced as well).

This yeast goes against everything I've experienced in my 15 or so years brewing. I'm fairly excited about this yeast b/c it brings another dimension to Summer brewing outside of Belgian influenced ales. I like to brew with the seasons rather than using temp control and this yeast seems to be it for those dog days of summer and brewing clean beers.


This post was edited on 3/14 at 3:37 pm


The Estimator
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
New Orleans
Member since Jul 2012
1161 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Great write-up Bug.

I used Voss on my last NEIPA, fermented more in the 60° range and it worked out fine. Some light citrus esters, but again, I fermented low for this yeast. It did finish at 1.018 which is par for the course on my New Englands, but it drinks somewhat thin compared to my Conan/London Ale ones. Still on the thicc side, but not what I usually aim for. The hops were equal parts Sabro, Medusa, and Zappa, all neomexicanus. The Sabro is such a stellar hop and it showed in this one. My previous NE was a 100% Sabro, Burlington brew. I got a slightly more complex, but still overtly candy peach thing on the nose and throughout the taste. For me, I feel like these Kveiks are going to be an incredibly versatile tool in the brewer’s toolbox, but the ways they will settle into utilization are still yet to be determined. I can see them working absolutely perfectly for warm weather, bright, citrusy American Ales from bitter all the way to NE/blond. I’m ready for the weather to warm up so I can crank out a Hornindal New England and let some of the assures Louisiana heat do some good work for me for once.

Oh yeah! I also used Hothead by Omega for a Blonde Stout I just made, which is also a Kveik strain. I fermented around 68° and still got some of the honey like esters people have talked about. I’ve heard from Oliver at Brewstock that someone brought in a Hothead “lager” they made and he said he would have bet large sums of money it was a Pilsner. We’re talking SUPER clean. So it seems these bad boys have some serious versatility to boast beyond the temperature variability.

By the way, if anyone is super interested in learning more about these Kveik yeasts, you should come to Urban South Wednesday March 27 at 7:00. Mark Schwarz of Omega will be giving a presentation on these strains. $5 at the door. Oliver is putting this on through Brewstock, so come out and learn about this cool new shit! Should be a good time!


Bleed P&G
New Orleans Saints Fan
New Orleans
Member since Aug 2003
2834 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

let some of the assures Louisiana heat do some good work for me for once

Kveik yeasts might be a godsend for some of us South La brewers. During the summer months, I can only chill my wort to about 80-85°F. I'll either use an old wort chiller submerged in ice or put the carboy in the fermentation chamber for 3-4 hours to get down to pitching temp.

I had been hearing about these yeasts for awhile, but never knew that they could produce clean beer. I thought they were for sours.


mchias1
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2009
303 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
I picked up a Vissani wine chiller for $50 this weekend.

(not mine in image, but have same model)
Image: https://www.homebrewtalk.com/forum/attachments/image-1675481708-jpg.74519/


waiting on a wifi chip (D1 mini) to come in the mail to add a temp probe. But so far I have it turning on for 2 mins every 45 mins and it's holding ~60 degrees. I let it run empty for a bit after I got it and it was able to get to 35-40 degrees.

I'll probably add a fan as well to circulate the air inside to help.
This post was edited on 3/18 at 7:41 am


USEyourCURDS
Southeastern LA Fan
Southeastern Louisiana
Member since Apr 2016
7186 posts
 Online 

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Nice!


LSURoss
Chicago Cubs Fan
Shreveport, LA
Member since Dec 2007
13534 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Anyone have a good Kombucha recipe?


The Estimator
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
New Orleans
Member since Jul 2012
1161 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
The dude, Brad, on Bon Appetit’s YouTube channel seems to have a good enough grasp on bucha that I’d feel comfortable following their recipe:

Bon Appetit - Kombucha

The video is funny, but informational too:
Brad makes Kombucha

You have a scoby or are you growing one from a commercial buch?


mchias1
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2009
303 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
has anyone used acidulated malt to lower your mash pH? does it affect the flavor at all?

i'm making a blonde wheat and going to attempt to bring my pH down some to help get more sugars from the wheat. right now my recipe i estimate about 5% of my grist as acidulated malt to bring my pH from >6 to around 5.6.


CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
47974 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

has anyone used acidulated malt to lower your mash pH? does it affect the flavor at all?

yes. and no it doesnt change flavor. you are using it to do exactly what it is supposed to do.

But i dont use it any more as i have a ton of lactic and phosphoric acid.


USEyourCURDS
Southeastern LA Fan
Southeastern Louisiana
Member since Apr 2016
7186 posts
 Online 

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Of course they come out with these after I buy unitanks

Spike Brewing Flex and Flex Plus

And this...


CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
47974 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
what size uni's did you buy?


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