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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Jimmy Johnson, the guitarist for the Muscle Shoals Rhythm Section (a.k.a. “the Swampers”) whose foundational R&B-based playing could be heard on hundreds of records, including iconic hits by Aretha Franklin, Paul Simon, Wilson Pickett and Lynyrd Skynyrd, died at the age of 76. His death was confirmed by his son Jay Johnson, who did not reveal a cause of death. “He is gone,” his son wrote on Facebook. “Playing music with the angels now.”
Image: https://i.imgur.com/edLGFFX.jpg


Ace Midnight
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Definitely a great one. Hood and Hawkins get a lot of attention out of the Swampers (for good reason), but JJ was great as well.


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auggie
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Damn, what a great picker, and nice guy, from what I have heard. Heard him sitting in with a few bands around, before I ever realized who he was, and that he was a pretty big deal. Found out later,but I never actually got to meet him.
There was a company called Bluesouth Guitars,that made a Jimmy Johnson Signature Telecaster that was bad ass, but out of my price range, back in the day. I sure would like to find one now.



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Tchefuncte Tiger
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

Little Walter


LW was originally from Marksville.


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Tchefuncte Tiger
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

Holy shit, totally didn't realize that Mose Allison died this year too. Wow.


LSU alum, too.


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VOR
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Hasn't Cohen been dead for years? At the very least, I would have assumed that Rebecca De mornay had caused cardiac arrest by now.


Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

Hasn't Cohen been dead for years?
quote:

Posted on 11/10/16


VOR
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since Apr 2009
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread


It's not nice to pick on an old fart.


hogcard1964
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Eddie Money

RIP


DeltaTigerDelta
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Member since Jan 2017
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Damn


hobotiger
LSU Fan
Asbury Park, NJ
Member since Nov 2007
4494 posts

re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
RIP Ric Ocasek, died today at 75
This post was edited on 9/15 at 7:09 pm


TFTC
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Chicago, Il
Member since May 2010
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
RIP Kim Shattuck (The Muffs)


TFTC
Southern Fan
Chicago, Il
Member since May 2010
20378 posts

re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
shite..

RIP Barrie Masters (Eddie & The Hot Rods)

I mean, this is one of the greatest songs ever.. Do Anything You Wanna Do
This post was edited on 10/2 at 8:00 pm


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
NY Times
quote:

Nick Tosches, who started out in the late 1960s as a brash music writer with a taste for the fringes of rock and country, then bent his eclectic style to biographies of figures like Dean Martin and Sonny Liston and to hard-to-classify novels, died on Sunday at his home in Manhattan. He was 69.

The exact cause has not been determined, but he had been ill, a friend, James Marshall, said.

Mr. Tosches (TOSH-ez) and his fellow music writers Richard Meltzer and Lester Bangs were labeled “the Noise Boys” for their wild, energetic prose, a world away from fan magazines like Tiger Beat and Seventeen. Interviewing Debbie Harry of the band Blondie in 1979 for Creem magazine, he thought nothing of asking whether she shaved or waxed her legs. Neither, it turned out; she told him she plucked them, one hair at a time.

“We speak for many minutes of legs and their lore,” he wrote. “Each of us learns a great deal from the other. A mutual respect is born.”

In 1977 Mr. Tosches published his first book, “Country,” a well-researched look at some of country music’s lesser-known and often roguish figures. “Unsung Heroes of Rock ’n’ Roll” followed in 1984, with chapters on Ella Mae Morse, Skeets McDonald and many more.

But by then Mr. Tosches had already begun to branch out. His first biography, “Hellfire: The Jerry Lee Lewis Story,” came out in 1982, and in 1986 he ventured beyond music with “Power on Earth: Michele Sindona’s Explosive Story,” about an Italian financier who was involved in assorted scandals.

One of his most attention-getting biographies followed in 1992. It was “Dino: Living High in the Dirty Business of Dreams,” about Dean Martin.

“Recordings, movies, radio, television: He would cast his presence over them all, a mob-culture Renaissance man,” he wrote of Martin. “And he would come to know, as few ever would, how dirty the business of dreams could be.”

For Mr. Tosches, Martin was a celebrity who beat the unrelenting fame machine, the one that often ground stars up and consigned them to early deaths. (Martin himself died in 1995 at 78.)

“I would describe Dean as a noble character in an ignoble racket in an ignoble age,” Mr. Tosches told The New York Times in 1992.
Probably my favorite music book of all time:

Image: https://i.imgur.com/MMlyUxR.jpg



Perfect Circle
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Canadian rock ’n’ roll pioneer Jack Scott, who placed four singles in the Billboard top 10 in the U.S., has died, according to several posts on his Facebook page. Wikipedia lists today (Dec. 12) as the date of his death, but a Facebook post from a friend claims that Scott’s wife, Barb, announced his passing two weeks earlier. No place or cause of death were cited. Scott was 83.

Scott’s biggest hits in the U.S. were “My True Love” (#3, 1958), “Goodbye Baby” (#8, 1958-59), “What in the World’s Come Over You” (#5, 1960) and “Burning Bridges” (#3, 1960). The first two of those were released on the Carlton label and the other two on Top Rank.

Another one of Scott’s hits, 1959’s “The Way I Walk,” only reached #35 in the U.S. but found favor with several bands of the punk-new wave era: it was covered by both the Cramps and Robert Gordon
"Goodbye Baby"

"The Way I Walk"

"What in the World's come over You?"

Image: https://bestclassicbands.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/12/Jack-Scott-color.jpg


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Roy Loney, best known as the original singer and songwriter for the influential San Francisco band Flamin’ Groovies, died today (Dec. 13), following surgery for an undisclosed issue. His death, at age 73, was announced by the band on its Facebook page.

The Flamin’ Groovies were formed in 1965 by Loney, Cyril Jordan, Tim Lynch, George Alexander and Danny Mihm. They ultimately signed a recording contract with Epic Records and then with the Kama Sutra label.

The first lineup of the Flamin’ Groovies (originally called the Chosen Few) changed its name to the now more familiar one and self-released the 10-inch LP Sneakers, followed by their major-label debut with Epic, Supersnazz, in 1969.

Unlike most of the San Francisco area bands of the ’60s, the Flamin’ Groovies specialized in straight-ahead no-frills rock ‘n’ roll, sans psychedelic jams.

Loney left the band in 1971 after four albums, including the cult classic Teenage Head
Flamin' Groovies - "Teenage Head"

Flamin' Groovies - "Slow Death"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/Dbdf4p1.png


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Kenny Lynch, OBE (18 March 1938 – 18 December 2019) was an English singer, songwriter, entertainer and actor. He appeared in many variety shows in the 1960s. At the time, he was among the few black singers in British pop music
quote:

He is also known for a single release of "Misery", the first cover version of a Beatles song to be released. In early 1963, Lynch had been on the same bill as the Beatles on the group's first British tour; John Lennon and Paul McCartney wrote "Misery" in January 1963, in the hopes that the artist on top of the bill, Helen Shapiro, would record it.Shapiro's record producer turned it down, but Lynch took the composition and gave it a much more pop oriented arrangement than the Beatles would use when they recorded "Misery" themselves on their debut album, Please Please Me.

Whilst on a coach with the Beatles (on tour with Helen Shapiro), Lynch reportedly offered to help them write a song, but quickly became frustrated and criticised their ability to compose music – at the time Lennon and McCartney were writing "From Me to You". Years later he appeared on the album cover of Wings' 1973 album Band on the Run, along with other celebrities.
He also wrote the classic "Sha La La La Lee" for the Small Faces, as well as collaborating with Brill Building legends Mort Shuman and Jerry Ragavoy.

And he's on the cover of Band on the Run.

Image: http://img115.xooimage.com/files/7/3/a/kenny-paul-56df2ba.png width=400


Image: http://img111.xooimage.com/files/c/7/c/misery-sheet-musi...y-lynch--56df2b0.jpg


"Misery"


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Kafka
USA Fan
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Member since Jul 2007
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Sleepy LaBeef, a rock and country performer who began his career in the mid-’50s and whose concerts continued to be a draw for the rockabilly community well into this year, died Thursday at age 84. No cause of death has been given.

Although LeBeef never had any singles chart above the 60s, his legend loomed almost as large as he did — the singer was around six-and-a-a-half feet tall — at festivals where he was often the lone remaining active link to the birth of rock ‘n’ roll. He earned his own chapter in one of the essential books about rock’s pioneers, Peter Guralnick’s “Lost Highway: Journeys and Arrivals of American Musicians.”
quote:

The singer released singles on labels like Starday in the late ’50s, Columbia in the ’60s and the revived Sun imprint in the ’70s before finally catching fire with a new generation of rockabilly revivalists with a series of 1980s albums on Rounder.
"All The Time"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/aPKiKn9.jpg
quote:

LaBeef was born on July 25, 1931 in Smackover, Arkansas, as the youngest of 10 children born to farmers, and got his nickname as the result of a lazy eye, some said, or simply looking “half-awake.” He moved to Houston in his adolescence and became a regular on radio shows like “The Houston Jamboree” and “The Louisiana Hayride.” On his initial singles, he was credited as Sleepy LaBeff (or, in the case of “Tore Up,” Tommy LaBeff), but he became “LaBeef” starting with his 1965 releases. In his early years, he shared bills with stars like Chuck Berry, Buddy Holly and Fats Domino. His own favorites, though, he told Sheree Homer in her book “Dig That Beat!,” were George Jones, Bill Monroe and Sister Rosetta Tharpe.


Marco Esquandolas
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Now the O-T handle “SmackoverHog” makes sense...

Kafka—Thanks for posting the bulk of these R&R deaths...I read ‘em all.

I grew up in a house where New Orleans R&B from the late ‘40’s to the late ‘60’s was played almost daily, along with a ton of Doo-Wop, swamp-pop, a bit of Cajun boogie, early Rock&Roll, and a bunch of regional stuff...so a good bit of the seemingly obscure records and musicians you post/link, I am somewhat familiar with (I’m 47 now).

My dad started buying 45rpm discs when he was in high school in NOLA in the late ‘50’s, and had built up a pretty vast library over the next 30 years. He even had his own show on WYAT radio (990 AM) on Saturday mornings of “New Orleans lost rarities” back in the ‘80’s. He ran audio for the Loyola University theater department while a student in the early ‘60’s, and I guess that’s where I can trace the root of my audio equipment hobby to.

Over the next 30 years, something was always playing In the house...even ‘80’s Rock/pop stuff—and there were hundreds of books too—Billboard yearly chart catalogs record label release catalogs, and artists’ biographies.








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