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TheRoarRestoredInBR
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Was just binge watching some "What's in your bag" on YouTube the other night. Tommy Stinson had Gang of Four's "Man in Uni" amongst many other solid records that influenced him.


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

McCoy Tyner, one of the most distinctive and influential jazz pianists of the past 60 years who became best known for his work with John Coltrane’s legendary 1960s quartet, died at age 81.
Image: https://i.imgur.com/DCewd7a.jpg width=500


With John Coltrane:

Image: https://i.imgur.com/5H4QZCZ.jpg


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Eric Weissberg, a gifted multi-instrumentalist whose melodic banjo work on the 1973 hit single “Dueling Banjos” helped bring bluegrass music into the cultural mainstream, died on Sunday in a nursing home near Detroit. He was 80.

Juliet Weissberg, his wife of 34 years, said the cause was complications of Alzheimer’s disease.

Though the theme songs to the film “Bonnie & Clyde” (1967) and the CBS sitcom “The Beverly Hillbillies,” both recorded by Flatt and Scruggs, preceded “Dueling Banjos” in exposing wide audiences to bluegrass, neither made it to the pop Top 40. “Dueling Banjos,” which appeared on the soundtrack to the 1972 movie “Deliverance,” fared far better, rising to No. 2 on the Billboard pop chart.

The soundtrack to “Deliverance” was also certified gold, for sales of more than 500,000 copies.

But Mr. Weissberg — who also played fiddle, mandolin and guitar — produced much more than a one-hit wonder. More than a decade before “Dueling Banjos,” he had distinguished himself as a member of two popular folk groups, the Greenbriar Boys and the Tarriers, and as an in-demand session musician in New York.
Eric Weissberg & Steve Mandell - "Dueling Banjos"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/FX0LojW.jpg


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Lake Charles native and singer/songwriter Philip “Phil Phillips” Baptiste has died. He was 94.

Phillips died on Saturday, March 14, 2020, according to his family.

He was known as Philip, or Phil, by those who knew him personally and those who knew him throughout the world knew him from the classic hit “Sea of Love."

The song went to No. 2 in the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 pop chart and spent 14 weeks in the top 40, as well as reaching No. 1 on the R&B chart. In 1959, it sold over one million copies and was awarded a gold disc.
"Sea of Love"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/7ZzaNT4.png width=350


Mizz-SEC
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread


FearlessFreep
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

Nick Tosches
Holy shit, I just went back through this thread and saw this.

Damn. I was dealing with some deaths closer to home around that time, so I had no idea Tosches had passed.

Unsung Heroes of Rock and Roll is a brilliant collection of mini-biographies in a style only Tosches could write. It’s worth seeking out for “Esau Smith: The Hairy and the Smooth” alone.

The Creem interview with Debbie Harry was my introduction to his work. My favorite exchange involved Debbie, responding to some darkly conspiratorial musing by Tosches by asking “Why would anyone do that?” to which Nick replied “The world is full of mystery. Why did Richard Speck murder eight nurses?”

I suppose he timed his exit about as well as he could. I imagine he would have hated to see his beloved NYC curl up into the fetal position and whimper the way it has in the past few weeks.


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Songwriter Alex Harvey, whose hits included Tanya Tucker’s “Delta Dawn” and Kenny Rogers & The First Edition’s “Reuben James,” died Saturday (April 4) according to a Facebook post by his wife. The place and cause of death were not revealed. Harvey, who was also an actor and singer, was 73.
In The Music Room Double Play: Alex Harvey - "Delta Dawn" & "Reuben James"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/M678py8.png width=400


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Ace Midnight
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

The 1st Edition



That's a relatively late era First Edition picture - with Mary Arnold as the girl singer.

True story - she married Roger Miller and performed with him and his band until death. She was the original singer, Thelma Camacho's roommate and beat out Karen Carpenter for the spot to replace Camacho.


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK

Gene Deitch, who drew brilliant cartoons for magazines and album covers in the '40s, has died at age 95.

Image: https://i.imgur.com/PSFvEXp.jpg


Image: https://i.imgur.com/yOfHTlo.jpg width=350


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Terry Doran, a longtime associate of the Beatles in various capacities – from supplying them with sports cars via the dealership he co-owned with their manager Brian Epstein to providing a key word to their song “A Day in the Life” to managing their publishing arm, and more – has died. The news was reported by the noted Beatles historian, Mark Lewisohn, who didn’t provide a cause of death or precise date. Lewisohn wrote that Doran was 80; his Wikipedia page indicates Doran was born in 1936, which would put him at either 83 or 84.

As Lewisohn wrote, Doran was “not only the man from the motor trade.” The author of numerous authoritative Beatles books was referring to the lyric in “She’s Leaving Home,” from 1967’s Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band album.

In the The Beatles Anthology, published in 2000, John Lennon was quoted about Doran’s one-word contribution to the song. “(There was a story in the newspaper) about 4,000 potholes in the streets of Blackburn, Lancashire. There was still one word missing in that verse when we came to record. I knew the line had to go: ‘Now they know how many holes it takes to – something – the Albert Hall.’ It was a nonsense verse, really, but for some reason I couldn’t think of the verb. It was Terry who said ‘fill’ the Albert Hall. And that was it. Perhaps I was looking for that word all the time, but couldn’t put my tongue on it. Other people don’t necessarily *give* you a word or a line, they just throw in the word you’re looking for anyway.”

Doran co-owned Brydor Cars with Epstein, the name derived from their names. Among the dealership’s customers for its luxuriously appointed Minis were members of the Fab Four.
quote:

After Epstein’s death in 1967, Doran managed the Beatles’ fledgling Apple Publishing company, a precursor to their Apple Corps Ltd. While there, he signed Scottish musician George Alexander (Young) to a publishing contract. Alexander was the older brother of the Easybeats’ George Young, as well as Malcolm Young and Angus Young, founding members of AC/DC.

Doran introduced Alexander to several other musicians, and together they formed the band Grapefruit. Doran later briefly managed noted Apple artist Mary Hopkin.

Following the Beatles’ breakup, Doran worked for George Harrison for a while, managing his Friar Park estate, as well as the London office of his Dark Horse Records label.
Image: https://i.imgur.com/ICVNiRq.png


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK

Image: https://i.imgur.com/kW0HReX.jpg
quote:

Ian Whitcomb, the British-born singer and performer who scored a lone top 10 hit in the U.S., 1965’s “You Turn Me On (Turn On Song),” died Sunday (April 19), according to Barret Hansen, host of The Dr. Demento Show, and several other online sources. Whitcomb, who had suffered a stroke in 2012, died from natural causes; the place of death has not been reported, but it was believed to be at a hospital in the Los Angeles area.

Whitcomb, who was 78, had been in ill health for some time, and a GoFundMe page had been established last year to help with his medical expenses.

Hansen wrote: “We’d been friends for close to 50 years, and we appeared as guests on each other’s radio shows several times. Ian was not only a fine singer, specializing in vintage British and American comedy songs, but a great scholar as well, author of fine books on a variety of musical and cultural topics.”

Although Whitcomb’s only major chart appearance came some 55 years ago—the R&B-flavored single, released on the Tower label and sung in a falsetto voice, reached #8 in Billboard—he remained active in the music business into his last years, as a performer specializing in often comedic, old-timey songs and as a musicologist and author. He was also an actor who appeared in numerous films and television shows.

His first book, 1972’s After the Ball, is described in Amazon.com as “an exuberant account of the origins and explosion of popular music, informed by the author’s store of experience in the field as a pop sensation of the ’60s.”
quote:

While studying in Dublin, Whitcomb formed a band called Bluesville, which released the single “This Sporting Life,” which bubbled under the top 100 in America. “You Turn Me On” followed and gave Whitcomb brief stardom—he performed in the U.S. on bills with the Beach Boys, the Rolling Stones, the Kinks and others.

Although Whitcomb continued to release singles and albums on the Tower label (unrelated to the Tower Records retail chain), he did not achieve further commercial success and moved on to other pursuits, including production (he produced an album by actress Mae West in 1972, among others).

Following the publication of After the Ball, his writing career continued with books such as Tin Pan Alley, A Pictorial History (1919-1939) and a novel, Lotusland: A Story of Southern California.

As a performer, he played vintage songs on the ukulele (he created the music for a documentary on Bugs Bunny) and recorded numerous albums, including Pianomelt, which consisted of 18 piano rolls. His recreation of the music played aboard The Titanic won Grammy awards for packaging and liner notes, which he wrote. Having long ago relocated to Southern California, Whitcomb continued to find work there as a performer and radio host.
I wasn't around when he had his hit, but I later saw him on talk shows discussing old timey music. I couldn't understand why anybody would be interested in that sort of thing... Now of course I'm very grateful for people like him.

Ian Whitcomb - "You Really Turn Me On"

Ian Whitcomb - "Where do Robinson Crusoe go with Friday on Saturday night?" - here Ian sings a music hall song from 1916

A very readable and informative history of pop music. Check your local library.

Image: https://i.imgur.com/uWEY12b.jpg


Ian Whitcomb
R.I.P.


Image: https://i.imgur.com/eVZbabF.jpg


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
LINK
quote:

Carl Dobkins Jr. (January 13, 1941 – April 8, 2020) was an American singer and songwriter, best known for his 1959 hit, "My Heart Is an Open Book", which went to No.3 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart. The record sold over one million copies, resulting in the award of a gold disc.
CDJr's hit shows the phasing out of rockabilly from the pop charts. It's pleasant enough, but although Carl was from Cincinnati, just a hoot and a holler from the Kentucky hills, there's nothing Southern about it at all.

Carl Dobkins Jr - "My Heart Is An Open Book"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/TpNUCqc.jpg


Mizz-SEC
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
COUNTRY MUSIC
APRIL 25, 2020 1:08PM ET

Statler Brothers Singer Harold Reid Dead at 80

Vocalist provided the baritone bottom end to the group’s hits like “Flowers on the Wall” and “Bed of Rose’s”

By STEPHEN L. BETTS

Image: https://i.ytimg.com/vi/Kme96eC-2sk/hqdefault.jpg



Harold Reid, whose bass voice, songwriting, and gift for humor distinguished his long career as a member of the Country Music Hall of Fame vocal group the Statler Brothers, died at his home in Staunton, Virginia, Friday evening after a lengthy battle with kidney failure, according to Reid’s bandmate Jimmy Fortune. He was 80.

Fortune posted a message on Facebook that read in part, “Our hearts are broken tonight. Our prayers and our thoughts are with [Reid’s wife] Brenda and his children and grandchildren and with my other brothers, Don and Phil. We made a lot of great memories together. I’ll miss you, brother, till I see you again.”

Reid, who with his younger brother Don and fellow Statler Brothers Phil Balsley and Lew DeWitt (neither of whom were related), achieved Top Five country-pop crossover success in 1965 with the Grammy-winning single “Flowers on the Wall.” The group appeared regularly on the ABC music series The Johnny Cash Show from 1969 to 1971, and also toured the world with Cash. From 1972 to 1977, they earned six consecutive CMA Vocal Group of the Year trophies, and went on to win that award three additional times. From 1965 through 1989, the Statlers reached the Billboard Top Ten with 32 hits, four of which went Number One.

Although “Flowers on the Wall,” penned by DeWitt, would stall at Number Two on the country chart, it gained additional interest through a contemporary cover by Nancy Sinatra, a Top Ten country hit by Eric Heatherly in 2000, and through the use of the group’s 1975 re-recording featured in Quentin Tarantino’s 1994 film Pulp Fiction. Tarantino credited the song’s inclusion in the movie (Bruce Willis’s character sings along to it while driving) as the idea of music supervisor Karyn Rachtman. “Karyn just kept giving me different tapes, and for every five new songs she’d put an old song on there,” the director said in 1994. “I [mentioned] it to Bruce, [and he said] ‘Oh god, I love it.’”

Harold Reid was born in Augusta County, Virginia, on August 21, 1939. In 1955, under the name the Four Star Quartet, he, DeWitt, Balsley, and Joe McDorman began singing gospel music. The group changed their name to the Kingsmen in 1958, and by 1962, McDorman had been replaced by Reid’s brother Don. To avoid confusion with other groups called the Kingsmen, they settled on a new moniker — the Statler Brothers, taking the name from a brand of tissues.

Introducing himself to Johnny Cash at a show in Roanoke in 1963, Reid and the group were hired by Cash two days later and with his help secured a deal with Columbia Records. “Flowers on the Wall” brought with it a flurry of TV appearances, commercial endorsements, and a second 1965 Grammy as Best New Country and Western Artist. By 1969, unable to sustain their hit-single momentum, they left Columbia for Mercury Records. With producer Jerry Kennedy at the helm, the group enjoyed a string of hits including “Bed of Rose’s,” (written by Reid), the nostalgic “Do You Remember These,” and “The Class of ’57.” The group’s, and in particular Reid’s, comedy skills were in full force on the 1974 LP Alive at the Johnny Mack Brown High School, which credits them as “Lester ‘Roadhog’ Moran and the Cadillac Cowboys.”

Following Dewitt’s departure in 1982, the Statler Brothers continued to tour and in 1991 began a regular Saturday night Fifties-inspired variety series on The Nashville Network, which ran through 1997. Their Independence Day celebration in Staunton, Virginia, began in 1970 and was an annual event in their hometown for the next quarter-century. After 38 years on the road, the Statler Brothers retired in 2002. They were inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 2008.

LINK


"Flowers On The Wall" (LIVE on the Porter Waggoner Show)


DeltaTigerDelta
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Goodbye Heart


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FightinTigersDammit
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

The group’s, and in particular Reid’s, comedy skills were in full force on the 1974 LP Alive at the Johnny Mack Brown High School, which credits them as “Lester ‘Roadhog’ Moran and the Cadillac Cowboys.”


Hilarious.

RIP


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Sorry if I'm a little late reporting this one (like, a year and a half):

LINK

Image: https://i.imgur.com/0Ua65Ud.png
quote:

Bleecker Bob Plotnik died November 29th at age 75. If you lived in Greenwich Village in the late 1970s or cared about music at all from that era, you will know Bob’s name or the name of his record store. He — and it– were seminal in bringing New Wave, punk, power pop, whatever you want to call it to America.

Without him it’s unlikely there would be the Ramones, Elvis Costello, Talking Heads, New York Dolls, so many acts now so well established in the music firmament but 40 years ago just whispers from Melody Maker the NME.

There was a moment– there is always a moment– when it all happens. For me that was crystallized in 1978 when I came back to New York from Boston. CBGB’s and the Mudd Club were where you heard the music, but Bleecker Bob’s was where you held, felt it, saw it, listened to, bought it. The first shop I mostly missed, but the second one was on MacDougal and 8th, next to Reminscence. It was a long narrow store, where Bob held forth behind the counter, yelling at customers, making no friends, holding his mastiff by the leash.

Eventually the store moved to West 3rd St. and got wider, broader. But the idea was the same in all locales: dusty records, well aged plastic sleeves where you could dig into the most recent history of alternative music– the non Fleetwood Mac world, the rebel yell, dissonant sounds. By the time I got to MacDougal, Stiff Records had taken over, and the early early Virgin Records, and Rough Trade and so on. This is well before CDs or the idea of them. The records were singles, they came from England, they had not 45 rpm gaping hole that required a plastic insert, but a small hole like an album that played at 33 1/3. They were almost all imports, some colored vinyl.

I was in college. All you had was the New Musical Express to tell you what was coming, when it might come to New York. The guys behind the counter– Chris, John, Chris, and of course Bob– had some idea. “Come back, Monday. Or Thursday night.” I don’t know why but the Pretenders’ first single from the UK, “Stop Your Sobbing,” and Gary Numan, and the Jam, and “We Don’t Need Your Fascist Groove Thing” stick in my head. I remember tall Chris explicating his hate of electronic music: “I don’t like records where the band can walk away and the music is still playing.”

My Bleecker Bob’s life was probably five years at most. As CD’s came in, the mystery of records was over. Tower Records opened on Broadway and you could feel the pull. By the late 80s, the era of punk/NewWave music was pretty much over. Rap had moved in. But imagine that for those five or six years, from 1978 to 83 or 84 it had been an everyday thing, the learning, the adventure. Those records– when I first started listening, buying in ’77 no one would play them on the radio. We had one year in New York– magical 1979– when Meg Griffith and co. played them on WPIX FM. But established FM like WNEW wanted no part of the Clash circa “I Fought the Law” or even The Police singing “So Lonely.” They were playing “Rumours” over and over. I hated Fleetwood Mac.

Well, it was all because of Bob Plotnick, who made no friends, and wasn’t charming. Every conversation was more like a challenge. But he shaped change in the rock culture by force of will. Before Tower, Sam Goody and Crazy Eddie were his only competitors. And we disdained those purveyors of square, soft rock as easy listening.
quote:

It’s mind-blowing. Sirius XM has a channel called 1st Wave. There was no 1st Wave or Second Wave without Bleecker Bob’s. Thirty years later, thousands of pretend power pop punk whatever fake acts have come and gone. They stream or download, they’re on Sound Cloud. They’re mostly not good, or awful. They should build a shrine to Bleecker Bob Plotnick. Without him they never would have existed.
I think I may have actually talked to this guy, on my one trip to NYC 30+ years ago. As I recall he was kind of an a-hole.

Image: https://i.imgur.com/4BnVeYU.jpg width=1000


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Backinthe615
Member since Nov 2011
6285 posts

re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
There are guys behind the scenes that, being behind the scenes, aren't the biggest headlines.

This dude was a fantastic keyboardist and a friend of mine. We travelled and recorded in the same circles for decades. There's a lot of folks in Nashtenny that are crushed by this.

I'm sure some of y'all have seen him killing it with Gary Allan.

I don't FB/IG, but I TD.

With great sadness, R.I.P. John Lancaster.

Image: https://www.countrynow.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/Screen-Shot-2020-05-02-at-1.27.23-AM-768x512.jpg


COUNTRYNOW

This post was edited on 5/2 at 7:59 pm


FightinTigersDammit
Northwestern St. Fan
Louisiana North
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
I saw Gary Allan in Ruston years ago. Great show. RIP, John.


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bleeng
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Apr 2013
3343 posts

re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

The Stranglers keyboard player Dave Greenfield has died at the age of 71


quote:

Greenfield died on Sunday having contracted the virus after a prolonged stay in hospital for heart problems.
quote:

(29 March 1949 – 3 May 2020)[1][2] was an English keyboardist, singer, and songwriter who was a member of rock band The Stranglers.[3] He joined the band in 1975, within a year of its formation, and played with them for 45 years until his death.[4]

He penned the band's biggest hit, Golden Brown, a song about heroin, which went to number two on the UK singles chart in 1982.
The Stranglers bass player Jean-Jacques "JJ" Burnel paid tribute to Greenfield as a "musical genius".
He said: "On the evening of Sunday May 3rd, my great friend and longstanding colleague of 45 years, the musical genius that was Dave Greenfield, passed away as one of the victims of the Great Pandemic of 2020.


LINK

Wiki page

Nice and Sleazy

Always the Sun

Get a Grip on Yourself

Golden Brown

Image: https://i.imgur.com/yD0XVDS.jpg


bleeng
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Apr 2013
3343 posts

re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
quote:

Florian Schneider of German electronic band Kraftwerk has died, Billboard confirms. He was 73.

Schneider formed the influential group and multimedia project with Ralf Hutter in 1970. Kraftwerk -- with its use of electronic instruments that included homemade and custom-built devices -- has been widely credited with pioneering electronic music and influencing various genres across the musical spectrum, including hip-hop, synthpop and rock with their soundscapes, experimentation and technical innovations.


quote:

Florian Schneider-Esleben founded Kraftwerk with Ralf Hütter in 1970. They met in 1968 while studying at the Academy of Arts in Remscheid, then at the Robert Schumann Hochschule in Düsseldorf. They played improvisational music together in the ensemble Organisation. Before meeting Hütter, Schneider had played with Eberhard Kranemann in the group Pissoff from 1967 to 1968.[1] From 1968 to 1969, Schneider played flute, with Ralf Hütter on Hammond organ, Eberhard Kranemann on bass and Paul Lovens on drums.

Originally Schneider's main instrument was the flute, which he would treat using electronic effects, including tape echo, ring modulation, use of pitch-to-voltage converter, fuzz and wah-wah, allowing him to use his flute as a bass instrument. He also played violin (similarly treated), electric guitar (including slide guitar), and made use of synthesizers (both as a melodic instrument and as a sound processor). Later he also created his own electronic flute instrument. After the release of their 1974 album, Autobahn, his use of acoustic instruments diminished.


quote:

Kraftwerk (German: ['k?aftv???k], lit. "power station") is a German band formed in Düsseldorf in 1970 by Ralf Hütter and Florian Schneider. Widely considered innovators and pioneers of electronic music, they were among the first successful acts to popularize the genre.[5] The group began as part of West Germany's experimental krautrock movement in the early 1970s before fully embracing electronic instrumentation, including synthesizers, drum machines, and vocoders.[5]


Autobahn

Computer Love


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