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Darla's Idea - First effort Cioppino

Posted on 6/11/24 at 1:24 pm
Posted by MeridianDog
Home on the range
Member since Nov 2010
14310 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 1:24 pm

I liked Darla's suggestion to select a dish then have folks make their version of it and post their results over some time period. I also thought her initial suggestion for Cioppino was interesting, since I have never cooked it and liked what I saw when I looked it up.

Here is an introduction to the dish I stole from several sources. I will make and post my version of this Italian immigrant fish stew in a day or two. In the meantime, do it your way and post what you got. It will be fun to see what you guys come up with.

*******

Cioppino is a hearty seafood stew that originated in San Francisco in the 1850s and is closely associated with the city. The dish is believed to have been developed by Italian immigrant fishermen, mostly from the port city of Genoa, Italy, who lived in North Beach and fished off Meiggs Wharf in the late 1800s. Meiggs Wharf was destroyed during the great earthquake in 1906 and when rebuilt, became known as "Fisherman's Wharf." 

The story goes that if a fisherman returned empty-handed, he would walk around with an empty pot and ask other fishermen to contribute whatever seafood they could. This became his "cioppino" and the ingredients for his dinner that night. All who contributed expected the same generosity if they came in empty handed in the future. The dish later became a staple in Italian restaurants around San Francisco. The name "cioppino" may come from the Italian word for "chip in".

Cioppino is made up of two components: a seasoned seafood mixture and a tomato-based broth/sauce, which are prepared separately and then combined just before serving. The dish typically includes seafood like clams, crab, fish, mussels, and shrimp, along with wine, onions, herbs, and tomatoes. 

The earliest known description of cioppino is from a 1901 recipe printed in The San Francisco Call under the name "chespini". The word "cioppino" first appeared in The Refugee's Cookbook in 1906, a fundraising effort for San Franciscans displaced by the earthquake and fire that destroyed Meiggs Wharf, which led to the construction of Fisherman's Wharf. The cookbook included a recipe for cioppino, which may have been the first time San Franciscans could buy a cookbook with an official recipe for the dish. 

Cioppino became a staple at Italian restaurants in San Francisco, and today it's synonymous with the city especially the wharf area. Restaurants like Alioto's, Sotto Mare, and The Clam House are known for their cioppino. 

Posted by Centinel
Idaho
Member since Sep 2016
43494 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 1:32 pm to
I make Cioppino all the time. Here's the recipe (cobbled together from multiple sources) that I make:

quote:

Ingredients:
? 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
? 2/3 cup finely chopped shallots (from about 3 shallots)
? 3 cloves garlic, minced
? 1 cup white wine, such as Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, etc.
? 1 (28 oz) can crushed tomatoes (San Marzano plums)
? 2 tablespoons tomato paste
? 4 cups Fish Stock
? Dash each of worchestershire and fish sauce to taste
? 2 teaspoons salt
? 1 teaspoon celery seed, crushed
? 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
? 1 teaspoon dried oregano
? 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed, crushed
? 7 sprigs fresh thyme
? 1-1/2 pounds firm-fleshed fish fillets, such as halibut, cod, salmon, snapper, etc., cut into 2-inch pieces
? 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (start with 1 tbsp and go from there to taste)
? 1-1/2 pounds (about 18) littleneck clams, scrubbed
? 1-1/2 pounds extra large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
? Fresh chopped Italian parsley, for garnish (optional)
? Toasted crusty bread (sliced baguette or similar)


Directions:
1. In a large pot, heat 4 tablespoons of the oil over medium heat. Add the shallots and cook, stirring frequently, until soft and translucent, about 5 minutes. Add the garlic and cook, stirring constantly, for 1 minute more. Do not brown.
2. Add the wine and increase the heat to high. Boil until the wine is reduced by about half, 3 to 4 minutes.
3. Add the crushed tomatoes, seafood stock, 1 teaspoon of the salt, red pepper flakes, oregano, thyme sprigs, and 1 cup of water. Bring to a boil; reduce the heat and simmer, covered, for 25 minutes. Add additional water if necessary to thin out broth.
4. When the stew is done simmering, remove and discard the thyme sprigs and stir in the butter.
5. Add the clams and bring the stew back to a simmer. Cover and cook for about 6 minutes, until the clams have mostly opened.
6. Gently stir in the shrimp and pieces of fish and bring the stew back to a simmer; cover and cook until the shrimp and fish are just cooked through and the clams are completely opened, about 5 minutes. Discard any unopened clams.
7. Don't forget the crusty bread to sop up the leftover broth!
Posted by MeridianDog
Home on the range
Member since Nov 2010
14310 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 1:46 pm to
Looks like mine. I sure wanted to see photos of prep and finished dish, which is why I have not posted yet.


This post was edited on 6/11/24 at 1:48 pm
Posted by Stadium Rat
Metairie
Member since Jul 2004
9606 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 5:47 pm to
quote:

Ingredients:
? 6 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided
? 2/3 cup finely chopped shallots (from about 3 shallots)
? 3 cloves garlic, minced
? 1 cup white wine, such as Pinot Grigio, Sauvignon Blanc, Chardonnay, etc.
? 1 (28 oz) can crushed tomatoes (San Marzano plums)
? 2 tablespoons tomato paste
? 4 cups Fish Stock
? Dash each of worchestershire and fish sauce to taste
? 2 teaspoons salt
? 1 teaspoon celery seed, crushed
? 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper flakes
? 1 teaspoon dried oregano
? 1/2 teaspoon fennel seed, crushed
? 7 sprigs fresh thyme
? 1-1/2 pounds firm-fleshed fish fillets, such as halibut, cod, salmon, snapper, etc., cut into 2-inch pieces
? 2 tablespoons unsalted butter (start with 1 tbsp and go from there to taste)
? 1-1/2 pounds (about 18) littleneck clams, scrubbed
? 1-1/2 pounds extra large raw shrimp, peeled and deveined
? Fresh chopped Italian parsley, for garnish (optional)
? Toasted crusty bread (sliced baguette or similar)


You not sure about those ingredients?
Posted by TigerFanatic99
South Bend, Indiana
Member since Jan 2007
28241 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 6:33 pm to
I don't see the pictures.
Posted by chrome1007
Toledo Bend
Member since Dec 2023
191 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 7:30 pm to
That’s a cool story.
Been to the wharf many times and had Cioppino at every one of those restaurants.
Every Cioppino I’ve ever had, had mussels. Some added scallops.
Now I’m hungry for some.
Posted by uptowntiger84
uptown
Member since Jul 2011
3971 posts
Posted on 6/11/24 at 8:41 pm to
I love Cioppino! In New Orleans The Pelican Club had the best then GW Fins then Irene's. But all 3 don't serve it everyday.
Posted by Gris Gris
OTIS!NO RULES FOR SAUCES ON STEAK!!
Member since Feb 2008
47676 posts
Posted on 6/12/24 at 12:41 pm to
quote:

You not sure about those ingredients?


I've had this happen to me when I copy and paste from a site. Some things don't translate to this site, sort of like if you use emoji's not on the site.
Posted by Stadium Rat
Metairie
Member since Jul 2004
9606 posts
Posted on 6/12/24 at 1:40 pm to
quote:

I've had this happen to me when I copy and paste from a site. Some things don't translate to this site, sort of like if you use emoji's not on the site.
Me too. Just messing around.
This post was edited on 6/12/24 at 1:42 pm
Posted by MeridianDog
Home on the range
Member since Nov 2010
14310 posts
Posted on 6/14/24 at 9:15 am to
Here is my version of Cioppino.

Cioppino

Ingredients:

1/4 cup olive oil
2 Tablespoons Bacon fat
1 medium onion, chopped
1/2 green bell pepper, chopped
6 small sweet peppers (orange and red) chopped
1/4 cup diced celery
1/4 teaspoon chili flakes
4 cloves garlic, minced
2 (14.5 ounce) cans crushed tomatoes
1 (8 ounce) can tomato sauce
2 teaspoons anchovy paste
1 Tablespoon Tomato paste
1/4 cup chicken broth
8 ounces Clam Juice
1/4 cup parsley flakes
1 Tablespoon fresh basil, chopped
1 teaspoon dried oregano
1/8 teaspoon dried thyme
1/8 teaspoon paprika
1/8 teaspoon cayenne pepper
1 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup dry white wine
10 ounce can of minced clams, with juice
1/2 pound shrimp
1/2 pound cod fillets, cubed
1/4 pound Sea Bass fillet, cubed
3 large scallops, cubed




Directions:

Cut seafood into manageable pieces. I left the shrimp whole.



Heat olive oil in a large pot over medium heat. Sauté onion, celery, bell and sweet peppers







When onion and peppers are tender, add red pepper flakes, garlic, anchovy paste, and tomato paste to pot, stir, and cook for a couple of minutes.









Add tomatoes, tomato sauce, chicken broth, clam juice, juice drained from clams, parsley, basil, oregano, thyme, paprika, cayenne pepper, salt, and black pepper. Stir well.













Reduce heat and cook at a low boil for 1 to 2 hours. Season to Taste with salt.





Add Clams, Cod, Sea Bass, Scallops, and shrimp, along with any other seafood you may want to use. Add wine and continue cooking, gently stirring occasionally, until the seafood is cooked through.











Serve with a crust of bread and a glass of white wine.







Thanks for looking.



This post was edited on 6/15/24 at 6:36 pm
Posted by cuyahoga tiger
NE Ohio via Tangipahoa
Member since Nov 2011
5880 posts
Posted on 6/14/24 at 9:43 am to
Well done MD.
Posted by Sugarbaker
Peachtree
Member since Jun 2023
289 posts
Posted on 6/15/24 at 10:15 am to
Making this SOON. Maybe even tomorrow for Fathers Day dinner.
Posted by Darla Hood
Near that place by that other place
Member since Aug 2012
14102 posts
Posted on 6/17/24 at 7:52 pm to
Yay for the thread, MD! I made cioppino today and had a bowl for supper. Mostly followed Ina Garten’s recipe, but kicked up the spice level. Will post pics of the process tomorrow, but here is my dinner serving.

Posted by Darla Hood
Near that place by that other place
Member since Aug 2012
14102 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:01 am to
I watched YouTube vids by Ina Garten, Giada, Rachel Ray (!), and others. Each one had good things to offer, but I ended up following Ina’s recipe. She made shrimp stock with the shells, but she added other ingredients and seasonings that I wouldn’t normally use and thought I’d try it.

Shrimp shells and heads, onions, carrots, celery, garlic, thyme, tomato paste, white wine, salt, black pepper.



Sauté the shells with onions, celery, and carrots a few minutes before adding the garlic, let the veg soften and cook for about ten to 15 minutes before adding tomato paste, thyme, white wine, salt, and black pepper. Let that simmer for an hour.





Sorry for no pics of the stock and pot of ingredients before straining, but the finished product is in the ingredient picture for the stew. White wine, fennel, 28 oz of crushed tomatoes, red pepper flakes, fennel seed, salt and four cups of stock.



Sauté the fennel and onions in olive oil before adding minced garlic. After a few minutes add a cup and a half of white wine, 28 oz of crushed tomatoes, fennel seed, red pepper flakes, and salt. Simmer for awhile, tasting for seasoning as you go. I ended up adding some Better Than Bouillon lobster base, a bunch of shakes of Tabasco green sauce, more red pepper flakes, salt until it tasted right.




(I chose to use an immersion blender for a nicer consistency.)

My fish and seafood of choice:

Halibut, black drum, Gulf shrimp, scallops, mussels, and clams. I added more scallops than pictured.







Last night’s dinner serving:




Before making the dish, I was picturing a brothier soup kind of dish. Almost summery. Not sure why it didn’t register as a stew.

I’d originally thought I’d have crab in some form, but the dish was getting pricey enough! Considered crawfish, but decided against.

If you don’t like fennel, you won’t like this stew! At least Ina’s recipe.

All of the recipes and videos featured some kind bread for sopping up the stew, but Rachel Ray took a round loaf of sourdough and cut it into giant “croutons,” dousing them in butter, garlic and seasoning before toasting. Then placed two giant croutons in the serving bowl and ladled the stew over it. Looked phenomenal.

It is rich, spicy, and kind of in your face good. Can’t wait to have some for lunch.
This post was edited on 6/18/24 at 11:20 am
Posted by Gris Gris
OTIS!NO RULES FOR SAUCES ON STEAK!!
Member since Feb 2008
47676 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:09 am to
Y'all have made some impressive dishes!
Posted by Darla Hood
Near that place by that other place
Member since Aug 2012
14102 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:22 am to
Making dishes I’ve never made before is fun, but when I’ve also never tasted it before, that keeps it interesting. Now i need to have it in a restaurant!
Posted by Darla Hood
Near that place by that other place
Member since Aug 2012
14102 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:25 am to
quote:

Cioppino is a hearty seafood stew
For whatever reason, I didn't process that it was going to be thick and hearty.

Your version looks delicious!
Posted by Gris Gris
OTIS!NO RULES FOR SAUCES ON STEAK!!
Member since Feb 2008
47676 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:32 am to
Next time, try bouillabaisse. It's a brothier seafood soup.
Posted by Darla Hood
Near that place by that other place
Member since Aug 2012
14102 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 11:43 am to
That is a good idea!
Posted by MeridianDog
Home on the range
Member since Nov 2010
14310 posts
Posted on 6/18/24 at 12:29 pm to
Thanks Darla. Your outcome looks great!

My update" When we had this, the wife (MHNBPF) told me I have cooked this before, years back, but my old version had a very liquid broth that she would have preferred. She liked the taste, but I think I used too much of one of my spices, maybe the thyme. I think a little thyme goes a long way and can overwhelm the dish. Because of that, I cut back the amount by half in my posted recipe.

I may make it again, especially if I can find some garden tomatoes and come up with enough money to buy the fish, which got a little pricy for a bowl of soup.

Also, I wanted to add Leeks, but couldn't find any after looking at four different grocery stores. The wife assured me they were out of season. To me, they would have added a nice flavor to the dish.

The large crouton idea was a good one. One of the better parts of my dish was the liquid-soaked bread. Going with large butter toasted bread dumplings/croutons would have been nice.
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