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S
Texas Southern Fan
Evergreen, LA
Member since Jan 2007
94743 posts
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re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Yea it’s a great read.


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Sasquatch Smash
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2007
7121 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Haven't read them, as it looks to be some young-adult, supernatural fantasy aimed at girls having to do with angels.

However, the author is this British chick with whom I had a few classes at LSU in the early 2000s. I imagine she was on an exchange program or something.



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Mr. Misanthrope
LSU Fan
Bayou Legume
Member since Nov 2012
1444 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Any of Walker Percy.


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cwill
Member since Jan 2005
38259 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
A Gathering of Old Men - Ernest Gaines


GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
8513 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Had to get to the last comment before I remembered the author's name. Ernest Gaines. Thank you.


"A Lesson Before Dying" by Ernest Gaines was required reading for us in High School. I remember really enjoying it. Just looked it up, since it has been a while, and apparently there is an HBO adaptation of the book that won an Emmy Award.


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emboslice
Oregon
Member since Dec 2012
3517 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Between the Levees - Jonathan Olivier


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SwatMitchell
LSU Fan
Austin, TX
Member since Jan 2005
1891 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
My first book is set in SE Texas with some references to Louisiana and LSU.

Please take a look: Theater District


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Rando
USA Fan
When IPs were Visible
Member since Apr 2015
11988 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
quote:

And, I join in those above who recommended Anne Rice. She can be inconsistent but when she is on (particularly in the first two or three Vampire books) her writing transcends genre and is as good as any.



As much as I love her vampire chronicles, her Mayfair writings are brutally vivid. And far more indicative of high society New Orleans than people realize. Not the occult aspect mind you (though it is present), but the attitudes and wealth located behind those high hedges.

If you don't mind the homosexual nature of her son's books, Christopher rice is equally gifted.


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TeeReg
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2017
49 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Louis Tridico's Last Island. Story takes place in the basin around the Henderson area. Tridico is from Louisiana, went to LSU and worked for the EBR Sheriffs dept.
This post was edited on 3/19 at 10:05 pm


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HECM62
New Orleans Saints Fan
NOLA
Member since May 2016
89 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
If you have ever been to Grand Isle, The Hard Blue Sky by Shirley Ann Grau fits those people to a tee. Very vivid description of life on those barrier islands in the early to mid 1900s


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Enadious
LSU Fan
formerly B5Lurker City of Central
Member since Aug 2004
15843 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
The Dinosaur Battle of New Orleans by...Enadious...

TDBoNO


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blueridgeTiger
LSU Fan
Addison, TX
Member since Jun 2004
11359 posts
 Online 

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Death in the Empty Quarter written by a sometimes contributor to TD, set partly in South Louisiana and partly in the Republic of Yemen.


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DaGarun
Northwestern St. Fan
Smashville
Member since Nov 2007
22456 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
quote:

My Sunshine Away

Just started listening to this yesterday, very good so far. Loved this part:

quote:

I believe Louisiana gets a bad rap.

I don't want this story to add to it, though I know it will, because people often discount what we say here. We are relegated to a different human standard in the South, it seems, lower than the majority of this great nation, as if all our current tragedies are somehow pay back for our unfortunate past. You may hear, for instance, something like, “Yes, it is a shame those folks in New Orleans drowned. But why didn't they just evacuate? Or, it is terrible about that boy being shot, but I'm sure you've heard about the race problems there.”

Another catastrophe? Another injustice? Forgive me if I don't look surprised.
This bothers me. It bothers everyone in the South.
So, in case you don't yet know, let's get this out of the way.
It's hot here, yes. It rains and at floods.

If you say. “It's not the heat, it's the humidity,” it's because you're from some other sunny place where you thought it was hot. It's both the heat and humidity. It's okay, you'll survive. There are ways to get along.

One thing you do is amplify the pleasure of meals. Three times a day you sit down with friends or family who, if you're lucky, are often the same. You take a break from the heat. You set a napkin over your lap and you can’t believe the utter joy. This tomato my just save your life, the cool fruit of it, that cold beer or iced tea your salvation. This is not gluttony.

You eat this way for a reason.

When everything else is burning, sweating, beaten down by a tortuous sun, only your tongue can be fooled. So you tease it with flavors like promises, small escapes from a blatantly burdensome land. You offer it up sharp spices, dark stews, iced cocktails. Anything you can think of to do.

There is a saying in South Louisiana that “when we eat one meal we talk about the next,” and this is true. Who wouldn't? In this imagined menu lies a future, a forecasted life, a community, perhaps even a weekend full of cheer and good food. What should we cook on Saturday? you wonder. Yes, honey, yes, darling, believe me when I say that sounds good. And at the house across the street, a similar family is doing the same. Perhaps a Sunday spent over a pot of beans. A lunch of hot po’-boys wrapped in butcher paper. It is also an unwritten rule that we don't talk politics at the table. This is not because we're dumb or old-fashioned or just too polite, but rather because we see right through it.

Middling stuff, the world. Nothing worth mucking up a fine meal.

And so the soul of this place lives in the parties that grow here, not just Mardi Gras, no, but rather the kind that start with a simple phone call to a neighbor, a friend. And after the heat is discussed and your troubles shared you say man it would be nice to see you, your kids, your smile. And from this grows a spread several tables long covered in newspaper, with long rows of crawfish spilled steaming from aluminum pots, a bright splash of red in a blanketing green of your yard. It is food so big it must be stirred with a paddle. You gather around this. You worship it. There is nothing strange about that.

Only the unfortunate don’t see it this way.
This post was edited on 4/22 at 10:47 am


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prplhze2000
LSU Fan
Parts Unknown
Member since Jan 2007
40350 posts

re: Fiction set in South Louisiana suggestions
Sugar Petite


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