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Tiger Vision
LSU Fan
Mandeville
Member since Jan 2005
3367 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.
A router is a layer 3 device, as in the network layer of the OSI model.

If you aren't connecting multiple networks together, such as an internal LAN to the Internet, then why even have a router?

The bottom line is the fact that a router is even present is an issue in and of itself. Its purpose is to route traffic between multiple networks. Hence the name router.

Polling machines should never be connected to anything above layer 2.


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Jjdoc
Columbia Fan
Cali
Member since Mar 2016
34026 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

Some routers, such as Cisco ISR routers can have hard drives and separate CPU modules in them which can run VMware and several virtual machines (servers) on them. This is nothing new. Been around 10-15 years. So the same physical chassis that one might traditionally call a “router” can actually route, process, and store data. These are used mostly for “office in a box” scenarios.



The machines are not to be networked. Nor online.


This isn't hard


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auggie
Auburn Fan
Opelika, Alabama
Member since Aug 2013
20460 posts
 Online 

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

Routers aren't solely used for internet.

Why would these voting machines need routers? Why would a vote tallying machine, need to be connected to any other device?


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davyjones
LSU Fan
NELA
Member since Feb 2019
14992 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

Why would the voting machines be connected to routers at all? They are not supposed to be connected to the internet. Why would you need those routers, if you aren't connecting to the internet?

I thought I'd actually heard that there was internet connectivity for the stated purpose of "improved dissemination to the public of real time vote tracking and vote counts". Something to that effect.


PsychTiger
USA Fan
Charleston
Member since Jul 2004
81417 posts
 Online 

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

More so, it was so ordered by the court for the BOS to turn them over



Image: https://media1.tenor.com/images/a8921ed1062fe6dcbd55e85e36844365/tenor.gif?itemid=14626844


auggie
Auburn Fan
Opelika, Alabama
Member since Aug 2013
20460 posts
 Online 

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

I thought I'd actually heard that there was internet connectivity for the stated purpose of "improved dissemination to the public of real time vote tracking and vote counts". Something to that effect.

Sure...that's all it's for..


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davyjones
LSU Fan
NELA
Member since Feb 2019
14992 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.


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BobBoucher
LSU Fan
Member since Jan 2008
12839 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

Dr. Kelly Ward explains


Caveat. Is the argument stating that the routers hold that personal info, or they might show the firewalls and routs to systems behind the router that hold the personal info?

The former is BS as she points out. The latter could be a legit argument.
This post was edited on 5/10 at 11:14 pm


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xGeauxLSUx
US Space Force Fan
United States of Atrophy
Member since Oct 2008
16456 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.

Exactly.







Here's a great article from none other than NYT
"The Myth of the Hacker-Proof Voting Machine"

Here's a snippet...
quote:

In 2011, the election board in Pennsylvania’s Venango County — a largely rural county in the northwest part of the state — asked David A. Eckhardt, a computer science professor at Carnegie Mellon University, to examine its voting systems. In municipal and state primaries that year, a few voters had reported problems with machines ‘‘flipping’’ votes; that is, when these voters touched the screen to choose a candidate, the screen showed a different candidate selected. Errors like this are especially troubling in counties like Venango, which uses touch-screen voting machines that have no backup paper trail; once a voter casts a digital ballot, if the machine misrecords the vote because of error or maliciousness, there’s little chance the mistake will be detected.

Eckhardt and his colleagues concluded that the problem with the machines, made by Election Systems & Software (ES&S), was likely a simple calibration error. But the experts were alarmed by something else they discovered. Examining the election-management computer at the county’s office — the machine used to tally official election results and, in many counties, to program voting machines — they found that remote-access software had been installed on it.

Remote-access software is a type of program that system administrators use to access and control computers remotely over the internet or over an organization’s internal network. Election systems are supposed to be air-gapped — disconnected from the internet and from other machines that might be connected to the internet. The presence of the software suggested this wasn’t the case with the Venango machine, which made the system vulnerable to hackers. Anyone who gained remote access to the system could use the software to take control of the machine. Logs showed the software was installed two years earlier and used multiple times, most notably for 80 minutes on November 1, 2010, the night before a federal election.

The software, it turns out, was being used not by a hacker but by an authorized county contractor working from home. Still, the arrangement meant anyone who might gain control of the contractor’s home computer could use it to access and gain control of the county’s election system.

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/02/21/magazine/the-myth-of-the-hacker-proof-voting-machine.html



These bastards know they're caught.
I think they're trying to mitigate any backlash but ultimately they know nothing truly serious will happen to them.
This post was edited on 5/10 at 11:16 pm


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60
sabanisarustedspoke
LSU Fan
Member since Jan 2007
4409 posts

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

hey keep logs that contain the IP and the times of connection.

Sure, but the article talks about sensitive law enforcement data, social security numbers and other info of that type, far beyond connection logs and audit trails





Exactly, it makes no sense because it makes no sense. This is the excuse the Dems are giving for NOT wanting to turn over the routers for a forensic audit or an image of them even. They are trying to bull shite people who aren't computer savy at all so that the investigators won't have access to where the routers were "routing info" during the election process.


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Bard
LSU Fan
Poli Board President-Elect
Member since Oct 2008
39973 posts
 Online 

re: Update from AZ Audit.
quote:

The Maricopa BOS is refusing a court order to turn over ROUTERS claiming they large amounts of voter data storage..... and they don't have the passwords...


I understand what they are saying. What they are saying and what I know as reality from my 20+ years in IT are two different things. If there is "large amounts of voter data storage" on some device, it's not a "router". Routers simply don't do that.

All a router does is route data (thus the name). At most it will store traffic logs (where was data coming from, where was it going and what time was this occurring - this could be valuable information if this feature wasn't turned off). What it will not store is voter data (because if it is storing that then it's not really a router, it's probably a virtual router and the voter data is sitting on the physical device hosting the router).
This post was edited on 5/11 at 7:21 am


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