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BallsEleven
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2019
1435 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

I’ll leave my mistake and wear it as a scarlet letter.




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2 Jugs
LSU Fan
Saint Amant
Member since Feb 2018
486 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
thanks guys,

I have 6 3'x9' boxes. I have 1 more year before I can get "serious" about prep work and strategy for planting.

I found my tomato yield last year was down from 2 years ago and will try to see if adjusting the ph will help. I am going to do a full soil test for next year.


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

I am going to do a full soil test for next year.


Why wait? I do one every year. In fact, I just went pick up one of the LSU ag test kits this morning.


2 Jugs
LSU Fan
Saint Amant
Member since Feb 2018
486 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

Why wait?


Because it is not in the plan for this year. Waaaaay to much going on this year and I don't need any more to think about.


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00
lsuson
LSU Fan
NOLA
Member since Oct 2013
7094 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
What I found out growing heirlooms is that if you plant tomato plants in the same spot you grew them last year they are more prone to disease. You should rotate them to other spots.


convertedtiger
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2010
2609 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
This weather is doing a number on my shallots. I have a dozen shallots that are sending up seed stalks. This is my first year with shallots and onions but I assume this is a bad thing. I'm going to snip the heads before they grow any more or try to open. I assume these plants are done and need to come out?


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
Conveniently enough, I was doing some research on onions a few days ago and bookmarked this link. LINK

quote:

1. As soon as you see them develop flower heads you should either snip off the flower at the top of the stalk or, if the stalk is quite thick, snip the whole thing off about 1 inch above the bulb (but not the leaves). Doing this stops the plant from wasting energy on making seeds.


BallsEleven
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2019
1435 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I was under the impression they are done in the spring once the plant begins to droop over, like garlic.

Edit:
quote:

Allium bulbs are ready for harvest when they have stopped swelling. At that time the leaves lose their healthy color, necks become soft and most of the tops lay over.


LSUAg: Onion, Shallots, and Garlic
This post was edited on 1/29 at 11:35 am


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convertedtiger
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2010
2609 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
Yes, that is the info I read as well. That's why I'm going to clip the heads and see what happens. I may pull a couple to use early as well since some have gotten quite thick.


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I was just looking through the LSU ag planting guide and I noticed they recommend an 8-24-24 fertilizer for almost everything. I've done an extensive internet search and can't find anything with that specific NPK ratio. Anyone know of a brand of fertilizer with this ratio?

ETA: Or if there is a recommended way to make my own?
This post was edited on 1/29 at 4:47 pm


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CrawDude
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Apr 2019
1270 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

I was just looking through the LSU ag planting guide and I noticed they recommend an 8-24-24

Where are you located? In Baton Rouge, Cleggs Nursery on Siegen sells 8-24-24. I suspect that many “Feed & Seed” stores might carry it as well. But I wouldn’t sweat it if you have trouble locating it, common 13-13-13 works well for home gardeners, and is recommended in many of AgCenter vegetable gardening publications.
This post was edited on 1/29 at 8:24 pm


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I may try Lastrapes in Opelousas. They aren’t far. Triple 13 is what I normally use and usually works fine.


BallsEleven
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2019
1435 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
Didn’t you use Texas Tomato food last year?
This post was edited on 1/29 at 7:25 pm


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I did. Didn’t find it made that big of a difference.


BallsEleven
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2019
1435 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
Gotcha, glad I didn’t pull that trigger then.


bluemoons
New Orleans Saints Fan
the marsh
Member since Oct 2012
4295 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I’ve had really good success with it. Also very easy to measure/convenient.


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

Also very easy to measure/convenient.


That it is. I may try it again this year. I think it was mostly just the unfavorable conditions preventing my plants from producing like I think they should've. So I don't want to discredit the stuff. Last year my yard settled and formed low spots around my garden keeping it really wet. And I battled a serious case of leaf spot disease throughout the growing season.

I've already taken steps to remedy that problem. I've raised the border and added more dirt. And I'm not quite finished. I'll be adding even more when the weather cooperates. I'm also planning on filling in the low spots around the garden so water drains properly instead of just pooling there.

ETA: As of this past weekend, this is what it’s looking like.
This post was edited on 1/30 at 2:54 pm


bluemoons
New Orleans Saints Fan
the marsh
Member since Oct 2012
4295 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
Looks great. What kind of dirt do you use for your bed?

I'm going to have to supplement mine here shortly. I need to pull my broccoli plants and I need to loosen the soil up a good bit. I'm thinking that I'm just going to add some vermiculite and peat moss, and amend the planting holes with compost. In the past, I've just amended the soil as a whole with compost. I think this had made it heavier than I'd like.

Assuming you're talking about the fall, I'll echo that. My fall tomatoes were pretty much a flop. I only harvested a few. Took me forever to get them going, then once they finally got to producing size, I caught hell with some kind of leaf spot. I fought it pretty well, but it would just keep coming back. I don't think the plants were ever able to really focus their energy on producing fruit. They finally started producing in November, then that random freeze right before Thanksgiving killed them all. It's a shame too, because I'm pretty sure if that freeze wouldn't have happened, they'd have survived into January.


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
10097 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
quote:

What kind of dirt do you use for your bed?


So, I still have a ton of clay dirt. So I bought 5 of those bales of peat moss from Lowe’s and tilled it in really good. Then I bought 8 of the big square bags of Sta Green Garden soil and tilled that in really good. To top it off I’m going to go to Lastrapes Garden Center and get them to load up my truck bed with the garden soil they sell ($25 per half yard). Then after I till it all up and get it as uniform as possible, I’m going to send a couple samples to the LSU soil lab to see what it looks like.

quote:

Assuming you're talking about the fall, I'll echo that.


Spring and fall. My fall tomato plants actually stayed a little healthier. But they barely produced anything before that stupid freeze wiped them out.


convertedtiger
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2010
2609 posts

re: 2020 Garden Thread
I have a question for those of you that start with seed indoors. What are you fertilizing your starts with? I read that you should start feeding when the first set of true leaves develop. I have about half of my seedlings getting to that point now.
As a side note, I love to tinker so I am running a few experiments after I get my first starts done and in the ground.
I bought three sets of lights.
One 4' 2 Bulb T8 florescent fixture with 6500k 2800 lumen bulbs.
One 4' 2 bulb LED Hyper Tough 5000k 5000 lumen fixture from Wallyworld.
One full spectrum 75w LED fixture with white red and blue light. The light from the fixture is more white than red or blue and around 3500k. This one is about 10"x 10".
All are around the same cost per fixture. I am going to see how they each do with some extra pepper seeds that I have. I'm not looking for power savings or anything, just how they look after about 6-8 weeks and how much I had to fiddle with the lights, watering, and such. I MAY try doing them in Hydroponic grow tubs to take the feeding variable out. That and the DWC or Kratky Method sounds like a rabbit hole I could get lost in for a few months or years.

Anyone doing hydroponics or aquaponics these days?


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