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lsu777
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westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
So I have been working on this for a week or so since work is slow right now. Seems like a good time to post. Please do not post until I have finished.

The Greyskull LP- A primer

Let’s get this out of the way, for all of you TL;DR guys who don’t have the patience to read this primer, skip down to section 9, pick a template and frick shite up while you read this primer and get a better understanding of all the principles of the program.


First off let me say that if you have questions about this program and I don’t answer on here, please feel free to email me @ tdlsu777 at Gmail

This is my take on the Greyskull LP. I have quoted the Book multiple times in this, but overall this is my interpretation of the program upon successfully completing multiple runs with the program and having others do the same.

Since so many seemed overwhelmed with the Greyskull Book I figured I would right a primer covering the basics of how and why to use the Greyskull LP and who would benefit.

Essentially if you are tired of being a fat frick, tired of being weak, tired of being skinny fat, tired of not making progress or just want to be a little more awesome……well this program is for you.

Essentially if you don’t want to be like everyone else and continue to look the same year after year despite being in the gym 5 days a week…well step up, read the following and rid yourself of frickarounditus.

The Greyskull LP is the program where egos are crushed and monsters are born. Decide for yourself, but I cannot recommend this program enough to those that are not extremely extremely advanced and even then the principles hold true.

The Greyskull LP is not just a novice program. It is a program that can be used by anybody at any level especially with the techniques laid out in the power building book which is essentially an advanced manual for the LP. If you think you are past the stage of running a program like this I encourage you to read the The Intermediate Syndrome.

THE WHO & THE WHY


So who should choose to run the Greyskull LP & implement its principles?
Any person who is tired or disillusioned with the results from other programs. Make no mistake about it, the GSLP is a results oriented program because in the end all that matters are the results.

If you have run the ever so popular Stronglifts or Starting Strength programs and are just tired of the Fat gains that come along with it, then the GSLP is the program for you.

If you don’t think a gallon of Milk a day is a nutritious way to pack on muscle, the GSLP program is for you.
If you are just starting out in lifting and want a program that is going to last longer that 12-16 weeks, this is the program for you.

If you are a newer lifter and think it’s stupid the other LP programs preach no other outside activity other than the program, the GSLP is for you. I mean an impromptu pickup basketball game should never be a cardinal sin.

If you are tired of being in the gym 5-6 days a week and not getting the results you want, this program is for you.

Whether you want to gain muscle or lose fat, there is a variation for you on the GSLP program.

If you are an intermediate lifter and are tired of complicated programing and just want to get back to slinging around heavy arse slag iron, the GSLP is for you.

Essentially do the programs principles, it can be adapted for anybody and everyone.

Intro-
The 3rd edition of the book can be found here please take the time to read and digest the book as it is full of wisdom for novice and intermediate lifters alike.

The Greyskull LP originated out of the Original Greyskull Gym in Philadelphia. It is the creation of John Schaefer aka Johnny Pain who is the owner of Greyskull. He is a disciple of Mark Rippetoe and was considered the nutritional guru on Mark’s starting strength forum. As people were following Mark’s advice to drink one gallon of milk a day, more and more starting reaching out to Johnny to help them un-fat frick themselves. Eventually Johnny started putting out more and more of his training advice and was eventually asked to leave the forum due to his advice not lining up with Mark’s. John had run the Starting Strength program as prescribed by Mark, but at some point just became extremely disillusioned with the fat he was gaining, with the demotivating resets, and with constantly hitting a wall after very little, if any, progress. This is a common problem with the two most popular Linear Progression programs, Starting Strength and Strong Lifts. At some point he hated what he saw in the mirror and when he asked for advice on getting past sticking points on the lifts….well he was consistently told he needed to eat more or that he must go to more advanced and complicated programming. Johnny refused to accept this and set out to find a better way.

Johnny is also a disciple of Daunte Trudal of DoggCrapp Training fame and you can see the intensity techniques used in DC training sprinkled into the GSLP and other programs from Greyskull. In the books you will see this influence of Mark and Daunte, but you will also notice a lot of bodyweight movements. This came from Johnny’s time in the Army and by the influence of Pavel Tsatsouline. The finger prints off all three men can be found on the entire program and this mixture of Progression, Intensity, and Frequency is what makes the Greyskull LP what it is.

Greyskull started off as one of the original cross fit gyms and Johnny hosted the coaching seminars along with Mark to certify coaches. At the time there was no cross fit coaching cert and anybody could become one. Eventually Johnny came to the realization that the Crossfit brand was hurting his business not helping it. He wrote two awesome articles about why he left and how to unfrick your Crossfit gym. Why I Left Crossfit & Eight Ways to un-frick your Crossfit Gym.

The LP started as just a reset protocol for the starting strength program. Johnny would allow his trainees to push the last set to failure while performing a reset to not make them do the weight they already did for the same number of reps as before. Eventually the HS students he trained started asking if they could perform resets to gain muscle. Although he had fought the temptation for a while, Johnny realized that even the HS students understood they were gaining more muscle when they pushed the last set to failure. In the End John set out to create a program that would rectify all of the issues with other LP programs while providing flexibility to allow trainees with different goals to actually achieve those goals. This led to the creation of the base Greyskull LP Program and the program in its current form did fix all of those issues. John created a program that’s primary intended purposes of allowing trainees to get stronger, build muscle without packing on tons of fat. In my opinion the GSLP is the perfect blend of hypertrophy and strength work and the program is unlike any other Novice or Intermediate program that I know of. The program offers slightly different versions for those interested in the following:
• Maximum Muscle gains
• Maximum Strength gains
• Fat loss
• Mixture of strength and muscle gains
• Improving Conditioning
• Fat loss
• Powerlifting
• Olympic Lifting
• Cross training similar to Crossfit.

This post was edited on 6/6 at 11:54 pm


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
The Greyskull Principles-
• Flexibility is everything in training. The other LPs are Rigid and close minded forcing many to come up short of their goals. Contrary to popular believe weight on the bar is not the only way to progress. If you want a strict adherence program, the GSLP is not it and honestly religion is for strict adherence not the gym.
• No longer is it against the rules to go play pickup basketball or other normal activities people do outside of the gym.
• Over complication leads to failure. Progress is everything and the only thing that fricking matters.
• frick Ego, ego and OCD are the number one reason people fail to reach their goals.
• You absolutely can gain muscle and lose fat at the same time if nutrition and training is on point.
• Squats do not need to be performed every session, in fact the opposite is true for many.
• Accessory work should be added to the base program to fill in physique goals
• The big lift of the day(squats
• Boredom is a progress killer, programs should never be so rigid that you become bored with training and quit. The best program in the world is useless to a trainee the minute they find
• A gallon of milk per day is not needed and only leads to fat frickitus. Better nutrition from whole foods leads to be results in both strength and physique goals than a gallon of milk ever could.
• Recovery is not affected if plug ins are slowly layered in over time
• Conditioning sessions can be added and are no longer taboo and a cast off to hell.
• The big lifts can be rotated out for their variants allowing self-periodization. They are rotated either once a lift stalls multiple times, for simple variation and boredom, or to fill in physique goals. No longer is wanting to due incline instead of bench or front squats instead of squats some taboo subject.
• Variant lifts can also be plugged in for one of the main lift days furthering progression.

The Greyskull LP is all about one thing, Progress. Linear Progression has existed since the story of Milo of Croton, the Greek wrestler who started carrying a Calf everyday on his shoulders. As the calf grew, so did Milo until eventually Milo was carrying a full grown bull on his shoulders.

The point of Linear Progression is to add small amounts of weights to the bar each session. This is common amongst all LP programs. The GSLP differentiates itself from others though because they slow this progression down, in fact they cut it in half only adding 2.5lbs for upper body and 5lbs for lower and lowered the frequency. This allows the user to continue to progress for much longer and not slam themselves into a wall. Johnny adopted these changes because he never understood why you abandon the most basic premise in training after only a few months and he never accepted that an LP can only work for so long.

Hence the Greyskull LP in its current form was born.

Why the GSLP is different than other LPs-

The Greyskull LP differentiates itself from other LP programs because it allows you to set weight or Rep records every session. Personal Records are motivating and really lets the individual push themselves much further than other wise. The ability to push the last set also allows the GSLP to be self per iodizing unlike other LP programs. No longer are you forced to do only 5 reps and if you fail you must reset.

Outside of the til failure final set, Greyskull also scales back the squatting to twice per week and the dead lifts to once per week. This allows the user to not feel so beat up and continue to progress. Combined with the reduced weight additions, this combination allows the user to run the program and continue to progress much longer than other LP programs.

Also the GSLP is not a set in stone program and is more a set of principles and allows the user to choose specific plug ins to reach their specific goal. Not everyone wants to be strong and fat, most begin lifting to look and feel better. Some want bigger arms, some want a bigger yolk, some just want to be ripped to shreds. No matter the goal the GSLP can be adjusted to fit unlike every other LP which says do what the program says and if you do anything else, its no longer the program.

The Program: What is the Greyskull LP

Part 1- The Core-
At its core the Greyskull LP is just the name given to the Greyskull Methods.

The base of the program will revolve around the 4 big lifts and their variants.
1. The Squat
2. The Bench Press
3. The Deadlift
4. The Overhead Front Barbell Press referred to as simply the press here on out

Part 2-Frequency- See page 26 in the book for more info

• The Squat is always performed on Day 1 & 5 of a week.
• The deadlift is performed on day 3, the second/middle training day of the week.
• The press and bench are performed in an alternating A/B fashion
• All plug ins are performed in an alternating A/B fashion

Why do we not squat three times a week like the other big LP programs (i.e. Starting Strength and Stronglifts); because we are trying to prolong progress and not hit a wall. Sure adding 10lbs per session and a total of 30lbs a week sounds great and so does a 720lbs increase over 6 months but is this really sustainable or are you going to hit a wall with the quickness? Its simple, less frequency, more intensity with the final set and slowly adding weight will prolong the progress and over a 6 month time will allow the trainee to make more progress then he would have on one of the aforementioned programs. We are interested in the longevity of the progress.

Adding 5 lbs 2 times per week would yield a 240lbs increase over 6 months, is this completely realistic, maybe? Taking a squat from 135 to 375 in 6 months has certainly been accomplished before, but it’s not the norm. So why not spread the frequency out more and slow down the progression even more? Because bar weight is not the only variable we are using.

Why do we only deadlift once per week while squatting twice per week? The deadlift responds better to being trained only once a week and a proper deadlift session will tax your CNS more so than a heavy squat session. With a progression of 5lbs a week, this still adds up to 120lbs or so in 6 months.

Why are the upper body lifts on a A/B setup and not squats and deads? Simple, the press and bench use less muscles and are less taxing on your CNS then squats and deads. This allows us to recover at a much faster rate.


Remember the more opportunities of individual stress/recovery/adaptation (strength in muscle gains) the greater the overall potential for growth and strength development. In other words, the more often we can provide just enough stress on a particular muscle for it to cause micro tears to have to adapt to protect itself, the faster our strengths and muscle gains will be, but recovery must be considered hence the overall volume of the program and the layering of plugins slowly to ensure adaptation to the increased volume. The goal is to keep frequency high and the load/volume significant enough to elicit this adaptation, without providing unnecessary beat down on the muscle and without unnecessary CNS strain.


This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:42 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part 3-Exercise order- See page 32 in the book for more info

Because most people prefer to have a well-developed upper body, we focus our intensity on the upper body lifts first in a workout. This is when we are freshest and keeps us from our CNS being shot due to the load that deads and squat place on the nervous system. No matter how grueling a bench or press session is, it will not come close to taxing the CNS or causing fatigue like the deadlift or squat do.

Because of this CNS strain we perform squats and deads as the last lift of the day, always. Bottom line is, it’s almost impossible to have an upper body workout be so tough that it messes up your squats. Also because we have removed the squat on Day 3 it allows us to prioritize the deadlift when compared to the other LP programs.

Focusing our intensity on the upper body lift first allows to fall into the trap of the other notable LP programs which call for the squat first. This is noticeable in before and after pics from trainees that have run these programs and an over development of the lower body or should we say under development of the upper body is very noticeable.

The final advantage to this order is it allows the lifter to lay on the floor and cry for a few minutes after the hard squat and deadlift sessions. If you do squats first and its hard as shit, but you grind out a new rep and weight record, the last thing you want to do is turn around 5 minutes later is go try and do the same thing on a bench or press session. Also a heavy squat or deadlift session is going to tax the core in ways nothing else can, this can and will affect your press, period.

Part 4-Set & Rep scheme- See page 33 in the book for more info

2x5, 1x5+ stands for 2 sets of 5 and a 3rd set of 5 plus however many reps you can get until failure. All of the main lifts with the exception of deadlifts are performed for a total of three true working sets. That means we start warming up with the bar(even on squat) and we add weight doing 3-5 reps at each weight until we reach our working weight. A simple approach to this is simply adding 20-50lbs to the bar until we reach out working weight.

For example-225 working weight on Bench
45x10
95x5
135x5 for 2 sets
185x5
205x3
225-first working set-5 reps
225-second working set-5 reps
225- Third set- 8 reps.

An Example deadlift workout with working weight of 265 is

135x5(we always start deadlift warm-ups with 135 due to bar height, if you have bumpers start with 65lbs)
185x5
205x5
225x3
265x9- here the lifter does one set to complete failure. Failure comes before deterioration of safe technique.

The first two working sets, we will arbitrarily stop at 5. One way to look at these sets is simply as your primer sets or as added volume for hypertrophy. Our third set we will take to failure. This is the money set and is the driver of progression both in physique and strength goals.

This flexible setup for reps from workout to workout is the self periodization element of the program. Not feeling good today, fine do the 5 reps with a PR weight and be done. Feeling good that day, great, now knock out 8 with a weight record. Obviously this allows the program to account for good and bad days, which every single person will have.

Part 5 -Progression- See page 35 in the book for more info

It is important not to attempt to make greater increases in weight than one can recover from and still return the next session. If we add too much in a hurry we will hit a wall and get stuck by frying our CNS by adding at unsustainable rates.

The more conservative we are with our weight increases the longer we can sustain progression. Some will scream that for a novice lifter these small increases are a waste of time and that is very far from the truth. Not only are we looking for muscle adaptation we are also looking for adaptation from our soft tissue (ligaments and joints) and from our CNS. This slower progression allows these items to catch up to the faster adapting muscles. Also again bar weight is not our only variable in this program like it is in other LP programs. With the sets being performed to complete failure the creation of a stimulus for growth and strength development is ensured no matter the weight on the bar.
Weight Increase per Session- See page 36 in the book for more info

• Add 2.5 LBS to upper body lifts (these plates can be brought from rogue or dumbbell buddy). Acquiring these weights is cheap and key to the overall program.
• Add 5 lbs to lower body lifts
• If trainee completes-Push the set to complete failure no matter the number of reps, even if 20, and make a decision to increase the weight or just reps next session. I recommend anything above 12 reps on the last set for all lifts but deadlifts, to double the increase.
• A note on rep ranges-The legs tend to respond very well to higher reps so increasing the number of reps even up to 50 reps in lieu of increasing weight is a very viable option for the squat. The money reps for the upper body lifts are between 6-12, so anything above 12 you should think long and hard about increasing reps. For High Rep Squats see Villain Challenge #2
• Do not exceed 10 reps on Deadlifts. If trainee gets 10 reps, double increase

As you can see from the above this will have use Progressing 7.5lbs every 2 weeks on all upper body lifts, 20 lbs every 2 weeks in the squat and 10 lbs in the dead lift. Again the above is not set in stone, feel free to cut the progression down on one, some or all of the lifts. I honestly believe in cutting the squats down to only 2.5lbs per session so an increase of 10lbs of 2 weeks. Cutting the weight that is added does slow progression but it also prolongs progression.

Rest- This will depend on goals but in general a legit 2 minutes on the first two sets and 3-4 before the last set is suitable. But rest periods should depend on the goal, if fat loss is the goal, shorten them up some, if strength is the main goal, lengthen them; if a mix of strength and muscle gain is the goal, keep them as is.


Part 6 - Starting Weight- See page 36 in the book for more info

The book does not give a ton of guidance on the starting weight. On page 36 he simply says to make an educated guess as to the weight to start with and to pick a weight that you would fail on between 8 and 10 reps.

My advice is start lower than you think you should. From my experience with 5/3/1 I encourage you to take your estimated one rep max and multiply by 0.9 (90%) and use that as your training max. Your starting weight would be 80% of that.

For Example on bench, you are able to complete 175x8 on the program prior to starting the GSLP. This gives us an estimated 1 rep max of 220(219). So 90% of 220 would be 200(198).

So our training max for bench is 200lbs. We will take 80% of that which would be 160(158.4). So 160lbs would be our starting weight.

1 rep calculator
Use the above link to estimate your 1rm. Then use then do
*.9*.8 and this will give you your estimated starting weight.

So I know many of you will be screaming, I don’t want to start that low, that’s stupid. Remember we are looking for long term adaptation, not short term/short lived weight records. I understand that it sucks to start 15lbs lighter than a weight you just lifted for 8 reps, but we are trying to work the program and the best way to get the program to do what you want is to start a little lower than you think. Feel free to do as Johnny Pain says in the book and start at the weight that you can do 8 times, but that does not leave very much wiggle room to build up momentum.
This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:47 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part 7 - ENTER THE GREYSKULL RESET- See page 38&39 & intermediate syndrome article for more info

Part 1 –The traditional reset
Almost every other LP program has you take 20% off the bar and work your way back to the weight you failed at using the same 5 rep sets. The Greyskull reset allows you to take 10-20% off the bar and complete the last set until failure. This allows you to go for a rep record. For example Johnny Joe Blow on Monday benches 200 lbs for 2x5 and 1x4. Now on Friday he can attempt that weight one more time. Let’s say he gets 2x5, 1x4 again. Well at that point he would take between 20 and 40 pounds off of the bar and start again. Let’s say he picks 10% (180 lbs). His next bench session he would do 180 lbs, this time he would be trying to beat the log book from the last time he did 180 lbs. So let’s say while working his way to 200lbs the first time he did 180x5x5x6 with 180lbs. Well this time at 180 Johnny Joe Blow does 180x5x5x11. Although he backed off the weight, do we think Johnny got stronger? frick yes he did.

This is the beauty of the Greyskull reset. It allows you to shoot for rep records on the way back up. Now Johnny works his way back up to 200lbs after a few sessions of setting rep records along the way and he does 200x5x5x7. Despite conventional wisdom Johnny was getting stronger the whole way back up to 200 because he didn’t arbitrarily stop the sets at 5 when he could have pushed for more reps.

The reality is that due the last set being As Many Reps as Possible (AMRAP), Greyskull actually is periodized. With the trainee immediately performing the 10% reset, the trainee will do just like the above example and hit much higher reps on his AMRAP set than they were before the stall at the same weight. This is of course due to the fact that you can do more reps with lighter weights than heavier weights and as shown above, 180lbs is no longer crazy heavy for JOE BLOW after his reset. The additional volume you are getting from these AMRAP sets, especially during a reset as you will be working closer to the 10 rep range, biases these reset periods much more towards hypertrophy. But again the bottom line is that if Joe Blow can now bench 180lbs for 11 reps he is stronger than he was when he could only do 180lbs for 7 reps; this is undisputable. This simple, yet often overlooked approach fixed the constant demotivation of resetting on the traditional LP programs. Essentially it made the reset fun and not a big deal and gives the lifter to destroy the log book and set rep records, all while packing on slabs of muscle.

This form or periodization is actually a form of the advanced technique of Auto-regulation. The program introduces it in a way that the trainee doesn’t have to think about it. Rippetoes books Practical Programming and the accompanying Texas Method program also introduce this concept, but they do it in such a complicated way that many lifters can never grasp the concept. Because of the simplicity of the GSLP. It allows trainees to understand the principles and the intensity required to see real results without reading 100 pages of studies.

This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:51 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part 2 –The intermediate reset- Why the GSLP is infinitely adaptable – See intermediate syndrome article and page 92-98 in the book

First off let me say this type of reset should only be performed after stalling in a lift at least twice. For the novice lifter, this would more than likely be applied after 3 or 4 resets.

So many of you reading this will be saying, yea well what happens after I reset and I get stuck again and then again…..WELL, WELL, WELL we have any answer for that also.

So if you read the Intermediate Syndrome article I asked you to in the first section, you would have any idea of where this is going. When Daunte Trudal introduced his now famous DoggCrapp Training method he introduced the training world to the idea of switching out stalled lifts for variants of that lift, example subbing bench for incline. Daunte did so because he realized that in the presence of proper nutrition, he who makes the most strength gains also gains the most muscle. This wasn’t a new concept in the powerlifting world as Louie Simmons of Westside Barbell had been doing something similar for years, but it was never out in the open like it was once Daunte made the now in famous Cycle of Pennies thread and shared his training and nutrition program.

Daunte came on the scene at a time when everyone was light weight and insane volume despite Dorian Yates & Ronnie Coleman doing the opposite and dominating all of Bodybuilding at the time. This breath of fresh air is incorporated into what I call the Advanced Greyskull Reset.

For this type of reset, a trainee would have already completed at least one of the traditional Greyskull resets. So how do we perform this advanced reset?

Imagine Johnny Joe Blow from above works his way back through the reset and stalls out again, this time at 215 lbs. Johnny has a choice, perform another traditional reset or he can remove bench from the program for now and replace it with one of its variants. In this case let’s say he chooses to sub in Incline Barbell press. Well Johnny would back the weight off quite a bit and restart blasting away on incline pushing the last set until failure every time. Let’s say he pushes the incline and gets all the way up to 225 before he stalls on this lift. Now he performs a traditional reset and blast away again getting all the way back up to 240 while destroying the log book along the way and packing on quite a bit of muscle. After he stalls at 240, Johnny decides he likes using the variants for now and chooses to use close grip bench for this run. Johnny again lowers the weight and blast away, working his way up to 225 on close grip, he performs the traditional resets and gets to 235 before stalling again.

Now Johnny decides he was to go back to his ole trustee the barbell flat bench press. But he hasn’t performed the lift in months and last time stalled out at 215. Do you really think that after improving his upper chest and triceps that he is going to stall out again on 215? frick no he won’t, hell he already blew past that with variants that are considered more difficult. Sure he will have to start at 10% less than his last stall, but on his way up he is going to absolutely destroy the log book and blow way past 215, prolly to up to something like 260 or 270 before stalling again.

Ladies and gentleman that is progress no matter how you look at it. What an idea, right? Understand that the lift itself could be a variable that can be adjusted and that adjusting the said variable would allow for continual progress with such a basic setup. This might not fit what the experts consider linear progression and that’s ok, but to Johnny pain and myself increasing at least one performance variable in one training with each training session is in fact linear progression.

If you think I am wrong and that Johnny Joe Blow would lose tons of strength, then go listen to Louie Simmons of Westside Barbell talk about squatting. His trainees rarely perform barbell squats outside of competitions, instead they focus on box squats, good mornings, speed squats etc. Are you going to tell me that it’s good enough for the best power lifters in the world, but not Johnny Joe Blow on tigerdroppings….bullshite? Daunte Trudal trains some of the most advanced bodybuilders in the world, including Dave Henry and many of his trainees are walking around with 225lbs or more of actual muscle mass. Daunte has all of his lifters replace stalled lifts with variants and has them continue on like nothing happened. So again are you telling me it’s good enough for the top and strongest bodybuilders in the world, but not good enough for Johnny Joe Blow on tigerdroppings because he read a book? If you believe this then you are beyond help.


Look no matter the program, all training is essentially linear progression, at least it should be if you want to make real progress over time. Sure it comes in different forms, but the bottom line is if you aren’t progressing in some way, then you are just moving backwards. There is no maintaining or standing still in this Game. There just isn’t, either you are getting better or you are getting worse.

If you take anything away from this article, take away the fact that you have to learn to think for yourself if you want to be injury free, strong and fit for life. You have to make the program work for you and your goals, not the goals of a damn program created by somebody that has never even spoken to you. This is not a blessing to go bastardize the GSLP but if you are an older lifter (older as in lots of time in the gym, not age); then sure feel free to blast away in higher rep ranges. Just blast away and get strong as shite in those rep ranges. Flat bench hurts your shoulder, well by all means, get you some plate mates for micro loading and get after it with the dumbbells. You gym only has a leg press and smith machine, well by god make that smith machine your bitch to were people in the gym no longer refer to it as the Smith machine but as your machine.

For the intermediate reset you have 3 things to consider when choosing which variant to sub in. Like I said above, you have to think and make the program work for your goals, not the goals of the program. You are going to have to have some self-awareness in choosing what is best for you. There is nothing wrong with having confidence, but we can all improve in some way and you need to figure out where it is you need or want to improve and address this when choosing a variant.




This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:52 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
1. Weak points- If you have a very noticeable weak spot in a lift, choose a variant that will help correct this weak point. This is the Westside Barbell way. For example if you struggle with the lockout on bench, focus on board presses. If you struggle with the bottom portion of the lift, remove weight and start performing Bench press with a true 3 second pause, work your way back up and getting as strong as you can on paused bench.
2. Physique holes- If you have a glaring weakness in your physique, well pick a variant that will help correct that. For example if you have small and weak triceps, pick close grip bench or reverse bench. Tired of your shoulders looking small and puny, well choose high incline press and get strong as shite on it and you will fix this problem.
3. Boredom- if you are bored with a lift and are not making progress, feel free to sub it out. Let’s same you love dumbbell incline press, so you sub out bench for this after 2 stalls. Now training is fun again and your love for lifting is back. This is ok and human nature. It goes both ways though. Let’s say that EZ bar preacher curl is your absolute favorite lift, well you better be busting your arse and beating the log book or you are eventually going to lose the lift and have to rotate it out and who in the hell wants to lose their favorite lift for a few months.

Part 3 –The advanced rest- Other Variables to manipulate

As we discussed earlier, on a proper program the weight on the bar should never be the only variable. We covered the first two variables we should look to manipulate in part 1 and part 2 of the reset principles. Now we will cover other variables to manipulate.

1. Training density- Training density is simply described as the amount of work performed in a specified time frame. I.E. manipulating rest periods. How do we do this? Well let’s say Johnny Joe Blow from above has performed 2 traditional resets on the bench press and has performed the intermediate reset and has gone back to bench and gets to 270lbs and stalls again. He performs a traditional reset but takes 20% off this time instead of the normal 10%. He then reduces his rest periods down 1 min between sets and again works his way up back to around 270 beating or at least tying the log book on the way up. Now he did this while performing much more work in a specified time frame. Even he only matched his records from before he still got stronger. Now lets say he stalls at 290 this time. He performs the reset with 20% coming off and this time moves his rest periods down to 30 seconds and repeats the process, again beating or meeting his previous rep records and gets all the way up to 300. He again performs the 20% reset, but this time he only does 15-20 seconds between sets. He again stalls at 300, are you going to tell me he didn’t get stronger despite doing the same amount of work and total tonnage in a much smaller time frame, hell yes he got stronger. And because of the density of his training causing crazy amounts of hypertrophy along the way. The trainee is not stronger and much bigger than before. This is more of advanced technique and should be used after stalling on other methods. This was not covered in the book and is something Johnny has talked about in Forum post and we have discussed on phone calls and through email. Eventually this works its way into being a form of the rest pause technique that Johnny discusses in the Power building book and that DoggCrapp training made famous.
This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:53 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
2. Total Volume- For the majority of trainees (95%) the 2x5, 1x5+ set & rep scheme is a perfect amount of volume to cause both strength and muscle adaptation. But for those that have reached a certain point, Johnny has his trainees perform the warm up sets as described above and then perform just the money set at working weight for AMRAP. They push this set to the absolute maximum knowing this is the only chance they get this session to cause an adaptation and they must beat the log book. For example Johnny Joe Blow is now benching 315 for reps. Instead of performing the traditional 2 feeder sets at working weight, they simply warm up and hit the 315 for as many reps as they can possibly get. At that point they are done. If you learn to push yourself this is all that is needed. Most of Johnny’s trainees in his home gym move to this setup after a couple years. This works extremely well on the pursuit of complete the bodyweight squat villain challenge. See pages 99-101

3. Deloading- There are three simple protocols you can use for the deload
a. This is simple, after 9 weeks of training, take a week off from the gym and then return the next lowering lifts by 5% and start blasting away again.
b. The second easy way is we train for 9 straight weeks blasting as hard as we can along the way and we set all kinds of personal records. Well on week 9 we come in and we find our maxes. This is referred to by Jim Wendler as the 7th week protocol. We are going to use it as the 10th week protocol. This about setting a PR and ensuring we are making progress. It is also time to rest and let your body recover.
c. The last and final way to move to what Daunte Trudal refers to a Blast and cruise setup. Essentially we are going to Blast away as hard as we can on our money sets for 6 weeks. Then we are going to take 10% off the bar and perform just straight sets for two weeks. When we come back we will go back to using the weight we stopped our blast at and we will try and beat the log book again. Another way to perform the Blast and Cruise method is after the cruise, we rotate the lift. For example, let’s say Johnny from above blast bench for 6 weeks, then does a 2 week cruise. Instead of going right back to bench he simply performs the intermediate reset and switches bench out for a variant like we discussed above. This allows continual progress in an easy to follow format. The time blasting can be adjust and auto regulated. If you feel yourself getting beat up, your mind is not into it, well cut the blast and perform a cruise, come back refreshed and then get after it again.


Ok from the above you can see how the program can adapt as you advance through your lifting career. It isn’t a complicated but you must think for yourself!!
This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:53 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part 8 – The Layout

Part A- The OG base: (see page 47 & 48 for more info)
[img] [/img]
Day 1-
1. Press-2x5,1x5+
2. Squat-Always last lift of the day- 2x5,1x5+


Day 3-
1. Bench-2x5,1x5+
2. Deadlift-(Always last lift of the day)- 1x5+

Day5-
1. Press-2x5,1x5+
2. Squats-2x5,1x5+

Day 8-
1. Bench-2x5,1x5+
2. Squat-2x5,1x5+

Day 10-
1. Press-2x5,1x5+
2. Deadlift-2x5,1x5+


Day 12-
1. Bench-2x5,1x5+
2. Squat-2x5,1x5+


Above is the base program. We will layer our exercises on top of this depending on one’s goals. This is simply the foundation program; for more splits see pages 49-55.

Part B-The Plug Ins- See Page 56-60 for more info.
Please see book for suggested rep ranges for each exercise if you have questions.

Before you just go picking exercises to plug in, I want you to stop and think about your goals. If they are strength based, pick strength based exercises and when it comes time to rotate lifts after a stall, pick lifts that address you weak points in a lift. If they are physique oriented, then pick those the well help bring up lagging body parts.

Once you decide what your goals are, layer in the movements that help you achieve those goals. For basic trainee looking to get stronger and look better I suggest the following

• Weighted Chins on Press days
• Straight Bar curls on Bench Days
• Row Variant on Bench Days
• Face pulls or reverse ring flyes on Press Days

The standard add-ons from the book are
• Weighted chins
• Curls in different varieties
• Neck extensions with neck harness
The above was a generalized approach but will serve most trainees extremely well. The neck harness is not needed imo and most non-athletes would be better off doing heavy farmers walks with dumbbells instead.

The Greyskull LP principles can be applied easily in designing a training program for any part of the population. Anyone can make serious progress and build lots of strength and muscle simply by following the OG Base program, but many will enjoy and relish many of the plug ins.

The Greyskull approved Plug ins- See page 58
• Bench Variants- Barbell & DB-Bench, Incline, High Incline, Decline, low decline; board press, floor press, rack press, paused bench, close grip bench, wide grip bench, reverse grip, plate loaded machine, hurricane press, landmine press, specialty bar bench, chained, bands, reverse band
• Tricep Variations- Close grip bench, close grip pushups, Incline close grip, high incline close grip, reverse bench/incline/high incline/low decline, skull crushers, overhead extensions etc
• Curl Variants- ez bar, dumbbell, barbell and all variations of these and ring curls
• Neck extensions
• Row Variants- all barbell, plate loaded machine, dumbbell and bodyweight variations of rows.
• Chin and pull-up variants- all hand positions, behind the neck, racked chins, weighted and BW versions, Rings, lat pull downs- all variations etc. Banded and Kipping pull-ups are a no go.
• Olympic lifts- Recommend sticking to Power Clean, Muscle Snatch and clean and jerk
• Direct Ab Work- Hanging L-sit and ab roller are the best
• Direct Calf Work-please google DC training Calf exercise to learn to train calves correctly
• Forearm Exercises-Wrist Roller, Loaded Carries, hanging for time
• Pullovers-Barbell, Dumbbell, Machine
• Dips- all varieties
• Pushups- All variations, weighted, ring, close grip, wide grip etc
• Cable Arm/Shoulder/Back Movements
• Smith Machine presses/bench etc for the more advanced lifter.
• Squat variations including front squat, box squat(different height variations), paused squats, barbell hack squat, squat machines, plate loaded leg press machines, hack squat, lunges, barbell step ups, sissy squats, pistol squats, split squats, zercher, cambered bar squat, ssb squat, belt squat, stance variations, high bar/low bar, buffalo bar squat, front box squat
• Shoulders- Bradford press, Plate loaded machine press, handstand pushups, db press, Arnold press, any version of barbell or db press including but not limited to standing, behind the neck, landmine presses, single arm db press, push press, clean and press, klovkov press, snatch grip press, javelin press, kneeling DB press, L-sit on ground presses, hurricane presses, scrape the rack, muscle snatch, Ahrens press, etc
• Deadlift variants- conventions, sumo, banded, Romanian, rack pull, deficit, snatch grip, good mornings-(seated, suspended, chains, banded, ssb)


The above list is not all inclusive and neither is the book. Bottom line is you should choose plug ins based on your goals. If you want bigger arms, well put in weighted chins, weighted dips, curls, close grip or reverse bench etc. Want a bigger yoke, well pick racked deads, farmers walks, truck deadlifts power cleans etc.

In general you should stick to the big multi joint movements if at all possible.



Rep Ranges-
• Curl Variants-2 sets of 10-15 reps
• Neck ext-4 sets of 25+ reps
• Row Variants-2 sets of 6-8 reps
• Chin/Pull up Variants-2 sets of 6-8 if weighted
• Olympic Lifts-5-6 singles per session
• Direct Ab Work-2 sets of 10-12 reps
• Direct Calf work-1-2 sets of 15-20 slow painful reps as described in dc training
• Forearm Exercises-2 sets of 12-20 reps
• Pull Overs-2 sets pf 8-10 reps
• Dips-2 sets of 6-8 if weighted
• Cable Arm Movements-2 sets of 10-15 reps


This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:57 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part C-Body weight Training- See page 61-75 for more info

Bodyweight exercises are highly encouraged to be incorporated into the program as “homework”. Please read thisarticle to understand the importance of the body weight training in the GSLP program. The bodyweight exercises are arguably the most important part of the GSLP. WHY? Because they set us up for good habits in the future and if you commit to 3 months of the bodyweight movements you will transform your physique.

Bodyweight exercises are performed because most people cannot handle tons of volume lifting and with the bodyweight movements being so easy on the CNS, it allows us to pack in volume over the course of a Day/Week/Month etc. . . . So what is the easiest way to layer in volume, we do easy sets of the core body weight movements, pushups and chin ups.

Pushups and chins lend themselves to higher volume so long as the volume is worked up to. They also are excellent tools for upper body development when used in High volume. The biggest mistake people make when trying to improve bodyweight movements is going all out too soon. Our goal should be to improve on our total volume of bodyweight “Homework” and stronger on our weight room training at the same time. With everything with bodyweight movements, everything should be relatively easy.

If you prioritize the bodyweight homework and commit to it, doing it every day with the same zeal you hit the weight room you will see amazing results.

We have three methods we can use
1. Frequency Method-FM method- practice of doing multiple submaximal sets throughout the day. See page 62 in book.
2. The Ladder Method- Similar to pyramid method. We pyramid up to a set of max reps, then start over again at 1 and repeat. See page 65 in the book.
3. The Total Work method- total reps over the course of a week. You assign yourself a total amount of work for the week, then split it up however you want and get it done.

Our Goals-
1. Use Burpees to reduce body fat(See villain Challenge #1)
2. Use situps and variants to increase core strength
3. Use Pushups and Chins to increase volume to cause Hypertrophy. ( villain challenge #3 & Villain Challenge #4)

4. Once a certain volume is reached for pushups and chins we will move to the harder variant. Think close grip, incline, weighted, ring and handstand pushups and weighted chins.
5. Once villain challenge #3 has been completed, dips can be incorporated in the same fashion.
Of all the bodyweight movements and methods, if you want fat loss work up to villain challenge #1. Burpees done throughout the day will keep you burning fat like crazy. The best movement for hypertrophy is going to be frequency method chins. These will build your arms faster than anything else.

I believe Johnny Pain put it best “The frequency method is one of the most important, yet often most neglected if not outright ignored, components of the Greyskull lp program. It is the practice of performing bodyweight exercises daily in an incrementally increasing fashion, the result being an increasing volume of sub maximal work performed over the course of the week and month. The results of those who skip the all-important piece and those who possess the resolve to actually complete the work, are not easily mistakable The latter group always produces a much more powerful result in all measurable metrics across the board”

“It is imperative to consider your strength training in the gym as the “assistance” work to, and layered over the top of your daily bodyweight work if you are to truly maximize your results from you training efforts”

PLEASE SEE THIS CHAPTER IN THE BOOK TO GET A BETTER UNDERSTANDING OF HOW AND WHY WE USE BODYWEIGHT MOVEMENTS. READ AND DIGEST PAGE 74, THEN READ AGAIN.
This post was edited on 6/6 at 11:01 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Part D Conditioning- See pages 76-81 in the LP book and the conditioning books for more info.

Section A- High Intensity Conditioning-
This is the layer that gives all the other LP coaches heartburn. Seems like now a days everyone is of the belief that you can no train to get bigger and stronger while also shedding body fat. All of the internet “gurus” from the starting strength forums over to reddit will tell you, if you want to get big and strong you have to accept you will put on quite a bit of body fat. Accept it and don’t be so vain. THIS IS FALSE!!!

We will touch on nutrition in a future article, but in general if the surplus is kept small, and the high intensity conditioning is hit after workouts with the same intensity as the lifting, well it’s a recipe for success. Bottom line is you don’t need to become a fat, milk chugging slob to add inches to your biceps, just need a little testicular fortitude and patience. What the hell is the point of lifting the weights so hard if you are just going to turn around and make terrible food choices and grow your man boobs as faster than your biceps? What good is being strong if you look like a barrel arse and can’t even walk up a hill without getting out of breath?

Nobody wants to be fat and strong, nobody. The facts of the matter are, one can lift heavy and hard, 3 or 4 days a week with tons of intensity, complete all of their bodyweight exercise, complete 2 or 3 heavy, short, and intense conditioning sessions a week and have zero negative effects if the trainee is smart in his approach.

To do this we must be eating enough and the conditioning must be short and intense.

So what does short actually mean? 10 minutes. In the conditioning books JP gives examples of approved Greyskull conditioning exercises/circuits/techniques. Choose one and complete as much of the challenge as possible in 10 min. Other examples would be 2 tabata sessions, sprint sessions, or burpees. No matter the exercise chosen the session must be intense and must have a 10 min time limit.

So how much conditioning should you do? Well that depends on your goal. Starting out we want to keep the sessions few and far between and layering the sessions in a little at a time, ideally starting with 1 session per week after the middle lifting session (deadlift day). As with most things in the GSLP there are no set in stone rules, but starting with one session a trainee could add an extra hard conditioning day after 2 weeks and then a 3rd session after the 4th week of starting the conditioning. These sessions ideally would be added after your lifting sessions.

In the end, you are going to have to figure what works best for you within the guidelines of the program. Remember you have to make the program work for your goals, not the goals of the program.

Greyskull’s mantra is they want to develop a “Nation of Linebackers”. You do this by implementing all the sections of the book including the high intensity conditioning.

The conditioning books will give you some great ideas and implementing these ideas will get you a long ways. With that being said, the number one high intensity tool in our arsenal is still going to be the burpee challenge (villain challenge #1).

Section B- Low Intensity Conditioning-Please see page 79
This is going to be the least sexy portion of the layers we can plug in, but the bottom line is that it’s damn effective, if used correctly, at shedding body fat.

So what is the correct method of low conditioning cardio on the GSLP, simple its fasted walking. This can be in the form of incline walking, weighted vest walking, ruck marching, or just plain ole strolling around the neighborhood at 5 am.

I am not going to go further into detail on this, read the book if you want to know why he uses it, just realize it works for its intended purpose.

Section B- Low Intensity Conditioning-
Please see the book on this, but essentially walk in the fasted state in the morning, preferabbly at an incline at a slow pace or with a weighted vest.


Section 9- The Templates-
See page 89. Below is a list of some sample templates- PLEASE READ THE BOOK TO SEE ALL OF THEM!!!!!

THE LSU777 Templates-

LSU777 GSLP for Aesthetics
Week 1:
• Monday-
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o High Incline DB Press-3x10-12
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Yates Row-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Wednesday-
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Barbell Curl- 2x10-12
o Close Grip Bench-2x8,1x8+
o DB Side Lateral Raise Super-setted with Face Pulls-2x10-12
o Deadlift-1x5+

• Friday-
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o High Incline DB Press-3x10-12
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Yates Row-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

Week 2:
• Monday-
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Barbell Curl- 2x10-12
o Close Grip Bench-2x8,1x8+
o DB Side Lateral Raise Super-setted with Face Pulls-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Wednesday-
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o High Incline DB Press-3x10-12
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Yates Row-2x6-8
o Deadlift-1x5+

• Friday-
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Barbell Curl- 2x10-12
o Close Grip Bench-2x8,1x8+
o DB Side Lateral Raise Super-setted with Face Pulls-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+


LSU777 GSLP for Hypertrophy with Rotating Lifts

Week 1:
• Monday- A1
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o DB Arnold Press-4x10-12
o Weighted Chin-3x6-8
o Weighted Dips-3x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Wednesday- B1
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Incline DB Press-4x10-12
o Barbell Curl- 3x10-12
o Close Grip Bench-3x8-10
o Deadlift-1x5+

• Friday- A2
o Seated Behind the Neck Press-2x5,1x5+
o Superset of DB Side Lateral Raise with Face Pulls-3x15-20
o Wide Neutral Grip Pulldown-3x6-8
o Weighted close grip pushups-3x10-15
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

Week 2:
• Monday-B2
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Ring Flyes or Flat DB Flyes-4x10-12
o DB Preacher Curl-3x10-15
o Reverse grip bench on smith machine-3x10-12
o Racked Deads-3x6-8

• Wednesday-Day A1
• Friday- Day B1
This post was edited on 8/17 at 1:04 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Templates from the Book-
GSLP with Greyskull Gladiator Linebacker Focus- See Page 106
Week 1:
• Monday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Tuesday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

• Wednesday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25
o High Intensity Conditioning session-10 min time limit

• Thursday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

• Friday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Saturday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

Week 2
• Monday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
PM Weight Session
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Tuesday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

• Wednesday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25
o High Intensity Conditioning session-10 min time limit

• Thursday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

• Friday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1
PM Weight Session
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Saturday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Burpee workout for Villain Challenge #1

GSLP with Mass Gain/Strength and Hypertrophy Focus- See page 108
Week 1:
• Monday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Tuesday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins

• Wednesday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Thursday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins

• Friday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Saturday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins

Week 2
• Monday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
PM Weight Session
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Tuesday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins

• Wednesday-
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Thursday
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins

• Friday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins
PM Weight Session
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o EZ Curl Bar curl-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Saturday-
o AM Fasted walk(20-30 min)
o “Homework”-Frequency Method Pushups and Chins


GSLP for Mass Gain with Rotating Lifts-See page 105
Week 1:
• Monday- Day A1
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Curl Variant-2x10-12
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Wednesday- Day B1
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Yates Row-2x6-8
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Friday- Day A2
o Decline Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Curl Variant-2x10-12
o Front Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25
Week 2:
• Monday-Day B2
o Sitting Barbell Press-2x5, 1x5+
o Lat Pulldown-2x6-8
o DB Row-2x12-20 per hand
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Wednesday-
o Incline Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Curl Variant-2x10-12
o Deadlift-1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

• Friday-
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Weighted Chin-2x6-8
o Yates Row-2x6-8
o Squat-2x5,1x5+
o Neck Harness-4x25

GSLP for Fat Loss- See page 109 for details and simple rules. This is the simplest form of the GSLP for fat loss.
Week 1:
• Monday-
o AM Fasted walk(45 min)
o “PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Tuesday
o 20 Min Aerobic Solution-See page 82

• Wednesday-
o AM Fasted walk(45 min)
o Barbell Bench-2x5,1x5+
o Deadlift-1x5+

• Thursday
o 20 Min Aerobic Solution-See page 82

• Friday-
o AM Fasted walk(45 min)
o “PM Weight Session
o Press-2x5,1x5+
o Squat-2x5,1x5+

• Saturday-
o 20 Min Aerobic Solution-See page 82
This post was edited on 8/17 at 1:06 am


Rossberg02
Member since Jun 2016
1352 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Good read for anyone who doesn't know where to start or anyone who doesn't know why things are planned the way they are planned!

Rippetoe is often forgotten now a days but he's good!


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busbeepbeep
New Orleans Saints Fan
Far, far away from Blue Oak
Member since Jan 2004
12574 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Awesome post.

Want to post any info for Phrak's modified GSLP?

I liked using his variations. Thoughts?

Image: https://i.stack.imgur.com/OUcEY.png
This post was edited on 6/6 at 10:57 am


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Reserved for Powerbuilding Book


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Reserved for Gladiator Series


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00
lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Phraks Modified version is another great template. I was just posting some.

Please feel free to Post any templates I didnt post.


tke_swamprat
LSU Fan
Houma, LA
Member since Aug 2004
5562 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
So it's just a MWF routine correct?

May jump to this after I'm done with Body Spartan as my fall running will crank back up.


lsu777
McNeese State Fan
westlake
Member since Jan 2004
9333 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Yes basic version is 3 days a week.


Doldil
Auburn Fan
The Ham
Member since Jan 2010
5789 posts

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
great write up...thanks for doing all that!


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Hu_Flung_Pu
USA Fan
Central, LA
Member since Jan 2013
13338 posts
 Online 

re: The Greyskull Methods- A Primer
Going to link this thread in the compilation thread of programs. Awesome work!


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