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GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
9844 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Looking at doing a west coast ipa similar to surf wax. I saw some clone recipes that were 88% 2 row and a touch of oats and wheat.


The Galaxy IPA I just brewed was 88.5% 2-row. I've used this grain bill before for a west coast IPA, and really liked the end results.

quote:

What's y'all's preferred mash temp for ipas? Read the brulosophy on MT and was thinking 148 for a dry finish and good alcohol content.


Yeah I go between 148-151 range, and I also tend to like them drier. I've never really noticed much difference in attenuation within that range

quote:

Preferred hopping schedule?



For a west coast or classic American IPA I do 60min, 10min, and 1 min additions then a single dry hop around day 7. I'm also not the one to take hopping advice from though , my NEIPAs lately have been a struggle.


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

The Galaxy IPA I just brewed was 88.5% 2-row. I've used this grain bill before for a west coast IPA, and really liked the end results.


The west coast pale ale i made this weekend was about 85% 2 row. The addition of whirlfloc made it extremely clear prior to racking to fermenter.

quote:

Yeah I go between 148-151 range, and I also tend to like them drier. I've never really noticed much difference in attenuation within that range


I was meaning to mash at 150, however my settings were for 148 before i realized i never adjusted them.

quote:

For a west coast or classic American IPA I do 60min, 10min, and 1 min additions then a single dry hop around day 7.


I did a First Wort, 10 minute, whirlpool, and will do a dry hop for 4 days.


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
So i was planning on packaging some sour beer this weekend, but i forgot to dry hop the beers, so instead, i will blend and dry hop, and package in a week or 2.

So yesterday, i did some taste testing and blend sampling of 3 mixed ferm beers.

Beer 1: L'internationale Saison batch 3
Brewed 1 month ago
OG: 1.039 FG: 1.006 4.3% ABV
70% Chateau Pilsen malt
17% red wheat
13% rye malt
20 IBU's of Hallertau in the boil
Late boil additions of Citra and Medusa (1 oz. each)
Will receive 2 oz. each of citra and medusa in the dry hop
Yeast used:
Sach - Bootleg Biology Saison Parfait
Brett - Bootleg Biology Funk Weapon #2

Beer #2: Bring on the Funk
Brewed 3 months ago
Inspiration for this beer was Jester King's Noble King and NOLA's Sauvage. I used the Jester King grain and hop bill, but added some caramunich for some added color reminiscent of Sauvage.
OG: 1.054 FG: 1.004 6.6% ABV
72% Chateau Pilsen
14% Flaked Wheat
8% Caramunich
6% Flaked Oats
Hops:
7 IBU's EKG in the boil
Late boil additions @ 10 minutes of EKG and Fuggle
Whirlpool addition of EKG, Fuggle, and Perle
Will receive dry hop addition of EKG and Fuggle
Yeast:
Sach - WY3724 Belgian Saison
Brett - The Yeast Bay TYB207 Brett Brux, TYB184 Brett Brux, TYB Lochristi Brett, Bootleg Biology Funk Weapon #2.

Beer #3: Mad Fermentationist Saison Generation 3
3 gallon batch
Brewed 13 months ago
OG 1.046, FG 1.004 5.5% ABV
57% Franco Belges Pilsen
39% Franco Belges Wheat
4% Carapils
10 IBU Saaz boil addition
Yeast
Sach - WLP565 Belgian Saison I
Brett/Bugs - Generation 3 of Bootleg biology's Mad Fermentationist Blend along with varying bottle dregs.

Tasting Notes:
Beer #1 L'internationale - Dry, hoppy. Great flavor profile that would benefit from acidity.
Beer #2 Bring on the Funk - Fruity, slightly tart. This beer could stand alone with no blending, or maybe very minimal amounts of sour blending. This is almost exactly what i was shooting for when making this beer.
Beer #3 MF Gen. 3 - Soft mouthfeel, with medium levels of acidity (on a scale of 1-10, about a 4/5). This will be the acidic blender to the other 2.

Blend Notes:
Beer #1 - Blended varying ratios and decided a 60/40 L'internationale/MF Gen. 3 would bring about just enough acidity to get it where i want it. Final blend acidity, on a 10 scale would probably be around a 3.
Beer #2 - I love this beer without blending. I tried a very small ratio of 4/1 bring the funk/mad ferm gen. 3 and it seemed to take away from the base beer. The multitude of brett strands added produced some acidity in small amounts to know its there, but to also taste some of the varying Brett complexities. If i do decide to blend, it will be a very small portion. Maybe 4.5 gallons of funk to .5 gallons of sour blend.
This post was edited on 9/11 at 10:37 am


GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
9844 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
How many bottles of various blends do you have on stock?

For the first time, I have a little pipeline of stuff going on.

On tap:
Margarita Gose - Very light and refreshing, glad I did another kettle sour while its still hot outside.

Fermenting:
Oktoberfest - Probably fine with gelatin then keg it the last weekend of the month, to have it ready for the first week in October.
Galaxy IPA - Going to dry hop this weekend and keg next weekend. Actually going to be putting this one into bottles from the keg for a party in early October.
Not-So Imperial Stout (only came in at 7.5%) - Its currently "aging", but really doesn't need it at this ABV. Honestly just waiting for it to be somewhat cool before I put it on tap. Trying to decide on whether or not I want to add some vanilla or coffee or both.

Planned:
NEIPA with Sabro, El Dorado, and Citra - Basically just trying to use up my remaining 2018 hops, and I really want to take another crack it not oxidizing my NEIPA.

After that, idk. Any ideas on beers that will be good for October/November, or for football season? Maybe a dry stout, or a wheat ale?


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

How many bottles of various blends do you have on stock?


I currently have 6 blends bottled. About 60 or so bottles, mostly bombers. 2 of the blends I only have 1 bottle left.

quote:

After that, idk. Any ideas on beers that will be good for October/November, or for football season? Maybe a dry stout, or a wheat ale?


Well you have an Oktoberfest and stout. Maybe a German style lager, like an altbier or a dopplebock reminiscent of Ayinger Dopple bock. Or maybe an amber colored pale ale similar to Sierra Nevada Pale ale.
This post was edited on 9/11 at 4:07 pm


puffulufogous
USA Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2008
6196 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
So I mentioned that I had issues with my oktoberfast mash efficiency. My efficiency was off by a fair amount after mash and batch sparge. When I say fair amount, it ended up at 1.040 when I expected 1.050 post mash. Its hard to say exactly what happened because I had a lot of stuff going on while I was mashing and made some errors

First, I undershot my mash temp initially which required me to add approximately 3 L of boiling water to my 4g mash volume to compensate. Secondly I didn't stir intermittently like I usually do. I stirred vigorously at the beginning but left it alone for an hour. Third, in order to try to compensate for my added mash volume I turned a three step batch sparge of 1.5g each into 2 2g sparges. Each of these things are good explanations of how I undershot my post boil gravity by 10 points, but this was the first time in a while I haven't compensated for my hard water (97ppm bicarb and 52.4 residual alk) with acid malt. I'm sure my mash ph could contribute to this poor yield, but there's too many variables to nail it down. Plus I have seen some stuff on the HB subreddit saying AiH forgot to mill some of their grain.

Long story long I recovered by boiling for twenty minutes before bittering and boiling for another 60 and managed to get my OG within a point of predicted.

I know some of you guys do pH correction with phosphoric or lactic acid. I listened to the brulosophy podcast ep about acid additions and have a better understanding about which acid to use and what concentration to buy. My question relates to when to buy a pH meter. I know its essential for sours, but for normal ale and lager brewing can I just rely on brunwater or BS for pH corrections or is a pH meter essential if you're going to be adding acids? Am I making too big of a fuss about pH for someone who is making simple errors? If it is essential, could you recommend one for a novice homebrewer? thanks


GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
9844 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
I add lactic acid on basically every beer I make for the mash. The exception is my dark beers that already add so much acid to the mash. I just follow what Bru'n Water tells me for the most part.... Getting my pH in a good range was huge for me in improving efficiency

I don't use a pH meter though for any beers except for my kettle sours.


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GeauxPack81
California Fan
Member since Dec 2009
9844 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Well you have an Oktoberfest and stout. Maybe a German style lager, like an altbier or a dopplebock reminiscent of Ayinger Dopple bock. Or maybe an amber colored pale ale similar to Sierra Nevada Pale ale.


I've been wanting to just put some sort on top of my yeast cake and try fermenting that way. I looked up popular beer styles for Wyeast 1007 and Altbier came up. I was considering doing that. Idk that I've ever had an Altbier though. Might go to the store and try to find an example to see if I like it.


BottomlandBrew
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2010
21658 posts
 Online 

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

can I just rely on brunwater or BS for pH corrections


Yes. pH meter is not necessary. Bru'n and most other software will get you in the range. Remember, it's a range, not an exact number. This assumes your input values for your base water are correct.


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BottomlandBrew
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2010
21658 posts
 Online 

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Idk that I've ever had an Altbier though. Might go to the store and try to find an example to see if I like it.


Good luck. You'll occasionally find them onsite breweries, but you usually don't find them in distribution all that much anymore. They were a popular OG craft style, but they've fallen out over the years.

Do you like amber lagers? They're not all that much dissimilar. Alts have a little more ester action going on than their lager counterpart, but that's about it. They're great and you really need to lager it to get it the true profile, otherwise you might as well be doing an amber ale. Jamil's Brewing Classic styles is the pretty definitive American version of the style. I can't find my copy of the book or I'd post it, but I'm sure it's on the internet somewhere.

Edit #1 Found it:
6 gallon recipe
9.8 lbs pilner
1 lb munich
0.25 lbs Carafa special II
0.25 lbs Caramunich
3 oz pale chocolate
32 ibu Magnum at 60
OG 1.050
FG: 1.014
SRM: 16

Edit#2. Realized I posted the Northern altbier recipe. Below is the Dusseldorf altbier recipe, which I prefer:

6 Gallon
8 lbs Pilsner
2 lbs Munich
1 lb Aromatic
1/2 lb caramunich
3 oz Carafa Special II
42 IBU magnum at 60 (0.8 oz)
2.2 IBu Tettnang at 15 (0.5 oz)
OG: 1.050
FG: 1.013
SRm 14
This post was edited on 9/12 at 5:27 pm


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BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
As you said, it’s likely a combo of things you mentioned.

quote:

Secondly I didn't stir intermittently like I usually do. I stirred vigorously at the beginning but left it alone for an hour.


I never stir intermittently. I add half the grains to the mash water, stir good, then the other half, and make sure there are no clumps and everything is well mixed then I let it sit for an hour or longer.

quote:

Am I making too big of a fuss about pH for someone who is making simple errors? If it is essential, could you recommend one for a novice homebrewer


Yeah as others said, bru’n water or I use beersmith water ph adjustment. I have more problems with ph meters so much so that I quit using them, at least for my mixed fermentation sours. You kinda need them for quick sours, however, but even then you could probably get away with just using the calculators.


puffulufogous
USA Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2008
6196 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
That's very helpful. The brulosophy crew acted like having a ph meter was expected if you were adding acid. Will pick up some lactic at LHBS soon


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Yeah, you don’t need much. I never use more than 1/2 tbsp. But if you have a calculator, just use that. Good luck!


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Reading this article on craft beer and brewing on lagering.

LINK

Thought this was funny, as i've always thought this the few times i've lagered.

quote:

Grow twice as much yeast as you would for an ale.
Chill the beer to at/below pitching temperature, 48–50°F (9–10°C).
Pitch the yeast and wait 24–48 hours for fermentation to begin.
Maintain the temperature for two weeks and watch minimal kräusen form. Be fascinated that anything is happening. (Is anything happening?)
Question the reality of the universe. What does it mean to “be happening”?
After active fermentation slows, raise the temperature over several days to 65°F (18°C). Allow the beer to sit there for two or three days to clean up the diacetyl.
Further question faith in the happening of things. Maybe look at what it takes to make whiskey; surely that’s easier.
Lower the temperature 1–2°F (1°C) per day until just above freezing.
Yeah, making whiskey has to be easier than this—just chuck it in a barrel and forget about it for four years, right?
Allow the beer to “lager” just above freezing for four weeks before packaging, then keep cool until properly carbonated.
If you’re making a Märzen or Oktoberfest, forget it—start in March, lager until September, and wonder why you didn’t take up stamp collecting.


quote:

And the truly fervent brewers say this can only be properly done with freshly fermenting beer added to the beer before bottling, and anything else is less than perfect and, therefore, heresy.

This is how a great many (home)brewers make lager—it’s the way we’ve been taught. It works. It’s also a giant, unprofitable pain in the ass. And it is damn near unnecessary for what homebrewers are trying to do.


puffulufogous
USA Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2008
6196 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Tasted and cold crashed the oktoberfast. Tastes damn good. Very excited to try it this weekend


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Tasted and cold crashed the oktoberfast. Tastes damn good. Very excited to try it this weekend


I wish i would have done one earlier to have ready for next month, but i had issues with my pilsner. Ended up with a bunch of diacetyl, but still managed to get rid of most of it by krausening even though it was already carbonated.

Maybe next year. In the meantime, i found 2 great oktoberfests that i like. Paulaner Oktoberfest-Marzen and Weihenstephaner Festbier.

I was going to do some bottling this weekend, but i have a birthday party at the house for my 2 boys. I will try to get the pale ale kegged Thursday.
This post was edited on 9/15 at 2:59 pm


CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
51828 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

wish i would have done one earlier to have ready for next month
Brulosphy's fast lagering process works fantasticly. is that a word?

LINKbasically it is lager ferment until 50% attenuation, then raise the temp either fast or slow to 68ish for the rest of fermentation then cold crash again. I have done it and it works.
This post was edited on 9/15 at 3:08 pm


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
quote:

Brulosphy's fast lagering process works fantasticly. is that a word?


I tried it with my pilsner but i also forgot a few things when i did it. My starter was undersized, and i may have used a strain that favored diacetyl more.



CarRamrod
USA Fan
Spurbury, VT
Member since Dec 2006
51828 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
which yeast? the last beer i did was a mexican lager and it was great. but yea i had a huge starter.
This post was edited on 9/15 at 3:36 pm


BugAC
USA Fan
St. George
Member since Oct 2007
38365 posts

re: Homebrewing Thread: Volume II
Did 2 yeast packs. Wyeast 2278 Czech pilsner and wlp 082 Czech Budejovice lager.


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