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KosmoCramer
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Member since Dec 2007
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Should I let it bench rest after the first shaping? Or put it in a bowl/basket and take it out again for another shape?

ETA: Sorry, I thought you mean two actual shapings rather than just a fold into shape, bench rest, then shapen/tighten.

I wasn't planning on resting between the fold to shape and tightening, but I think I will now since I let it over ferment, and I'm using a 5 qt dutch oven.
This post was edited on 2/11 at 10:07 am


Trout Bandit
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Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
7622 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
quote:

Should I let it bench rest after the first shaping?

Yes. You should divide and do a preshape before allowing the loaves to bench rest for 30 minutes. Then you do your final shaping before putting into your proofing baskets.


hungryone
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river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
After dividing and preshaping, I give it a bench rest of about 15-20 minutes. Or, long enough to shape 6-8 loaves (my usual batch size), wash my hands, wash the container I used to bulk ferment, dry & put away the container. I then flour the bannetons (proofing baskets), and go back for the final shaping.

To me, the two hardest parts of bread baking are 1)shaping and 2)judging exactly when the bread is at optimum proof. #1 gets easier with practice, and #2 is art....I’m still working on that sense of judgement. I often resort to the fridge to store the shaped loaves in banneton, in order to squeeze an extra hour or two into the schedule. It’s also a way of holding the loaves when I make many at once, as my oven capacity is a mere 3 loaves.


Trout Bandit
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Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
7622 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I agree with you on both accounts. I usually bulk ferment in my oven with the light on so the temp hovers around 85 degrees and my dough ends up around 78-80 when bulk is finished. This past weekend I was using my oven and had to bulk at room temp which is about 68-70 and my final dough temp was 74 or 75. Bulk lasted an hour longer than usual and the sourness in my bread was much more pronounced due to the colder bulk ferment.


Motorboat
LSU Fan
At the camp
Member since Oct 2007
18487 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I'm doing this shite. What was the book you told me about Friday?

When both my kids ate your sourdough and liked it, I knew you were on to something good.


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KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I bench rested them, reshaped them, and now they're proofing in two bowls. I dont have bannetons yet.

I need a nice 12 qt round container with lid, and bannetons. I have everything else Forkish recommends. I was trying to fold in a 12 qt Cambro that's square and it was awkward.


I'll take a photo of the baked bread and a crumb shot no matter what it looks like.
This post was edited on 2/11 at 12:54 pm


hungryone
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river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I like 10 quart round Cambros. I'm short, and the 2" extra height of the 12 quart makes a difference to me. I also find it easier to mix, stretch, and fold if I put the container on a low stool (chair distance from the ground), rather than trying to put it on a tabletop or countertop.

I use 10-12 quart squares as well, simply because they fit into the refrigerator more efficiently than the tall rounds. A flexible plastic dough scraper is helpful to get into the corners of a square. Also, put the water in first, then the flour(s), and you'll have an easier time of mixing in a square. The lexan squares are translucent, so you can see from the outside whether you've mixed in all the bits.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61278 posts
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Just opened the lid to let it get its crust and it actually looks like a boule of bread

I was expecting a pancake.

I didn't score it, and it didn't really open up like I thought it would.

Forkish doesn't score. I think I will on the second one.
This post was edited on 2/11 at 1:50 pm


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Told ya you'd be surprised. It's amazing what a hot oven & a closed pot will accomplish.

I score--I do it in part for ID. I use certain scores on certain breads, so I can tell at a glance, even when fished from the freezer in a frosty ziploc, what's inside. I also find that oven spring is improved with a score. No lame--just a sharp razor blade from the hardware store (the single blade kind you'd use in a utility knife.)

Try a basic X score or hash mark/pound sign, or a Z. Scoring is an art in itself; I've seen some amazing decorative scores.


KosmoCramer
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Member since Dec 2007
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
r/breadit has some crazy scores on it.


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KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Just out of the oven





KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61278 posts
 Online 

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Crumb shot



hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Oooh, you cut it too soon! Let a loaf like that sit at least an hour before you cut it. The cooling is part of the cooking, the starches in the crumb will continue to set until the loaf is room temp. You probably noticed that the crumb is a bit sticky and tears rather than slices neatly.

Overall appearance is good; scoring will "dress it up" a bit more. The Forkish style loaves take nicely to mix-ins. 90-120 grams of stuff (coarsely broken pecans or walnuts, coarsely chopped olives, 2 T herbes de provence, grated zest of a couple of lemons & some chopped rosemary, sunflower seeds, flax seeds, sesame seeds, dried cherries & dark chocolate chips, etc) will flavor a loaf without overwhelming it. Do the initial autolyse, add yeast/salt, and stretch & fold at least once before adding the stuff. Plop it on top, then fold it in just the way you'd do the salt/yeast.


KosmoCramer
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Member since Dec 2007
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I let my brother borrow my bread knife and didn't realize till just now


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
I don't use a bread knife on fat rustic boules. Use a sharp chef's knife. Cut the whole round in half, turn the half cut face down on a cutting board. Then cut slices as needed. Those slices will fit into a standard toaster, and the half you're not slicing will stay fresh longer if stored cut face down on a board, wrapped in a cloth.


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Trout Bandit
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2012
7622 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Use whatever knife gets the job done and don't cut into it while it's still hot. Other than that, great job man! Looks almost as good as my first loaf.


KosmoCramer
Ohio State Fan
Member since Dec 2007
61278 posts
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re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Here's the 2nd loaf from my first batch. I scored it with a too dull of knife.




Definitely getting bannetons and double edged razor blades soon. And maybe a lodge combo cooker to do two at once.
This post was edited on 2/11 at 8:38 pm


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
A floured towel in a bowl works just as well as a banneton. If you do get bannetons, store them in the freezer between uses. They can harbor flour weevils, and ain’t nobody got time for dat.


hungryone
LSU Fan
river parishes
Member since Sep 2010
8112 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Anyone baking today? Four loaves of sunflower, four loaves of walnut, eight loaves of challah all on the shaped rise right now.


Creamer
LSU Fan
louisiana
Member since Jul 2010
2816 posts

re: Baking Bread 101: Beginning a sourdough starter (pics)
Where the pics at?


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