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TizzyT4theUofA
Alabama Fan
Biloxi,MS
Member since Jun 2016
2651 posts

Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
I want to get books to listen to. I just got done listening to Common Sense. There are so many books I don’t even know where to start.


rebelrouser
Furman Fan
Columbia, SC
Member since Feb 2013
3625 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Undaunted Courage Stephen Ambrose


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Htowntiger90
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Dec 2018
154 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Founding Brothers - Joseph J. Ellis
Truman - David McCullough

The Harry Truman biography is long but I learned lots about 20th century American history & politics.


TizzyT4theUofA
Alabama Fan
Biloxi,MS
Member since Jun 2016
2651 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Thank you, I appreciate all the recommendations and if anyone else wants to add that would be great!


Catch14
LSU Fan
Kingwood Texas
Member since Apr 2019
11 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Killing Patton


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21
Htowntiger90
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Dec 2018
154 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
If you like the Stephen Ambrose and David McCullough books, they've written plenty on American history. Ambrose moreso on WWII, McCullough more on general history and presidential biography. His bio on John Adams is a good one.


bayoubengals88
Wisconsin Fan
LA
Member since Sep 2007
11346 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Your starting points should be Gordon Wood and Edmund S. Morgan.

Do you even Good Will Hunting?


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20
Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99000 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
1920 The Year of the Six Presidents: David Pietrusza - Amazon.com

quote:

The presidential election of 1920 was among history's most dramatic. Six once-and-future presidents-Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt-jockeyed for the White House. With voters choosing between Wilson's League of Nations and Harding's front-porch isolationism, the 1920 election shaped modern America. Women won the vote. Republicans outspent Democrats by 4 to 1, as voters witnessed the first extensive newsreel coverage, modern campaign advertising, and results broadcast on radio. America had become an urban nation: Automobiles, mass production, chain stores, and easy credit transformed the economy. 1920 paints a vivid portrait of America, beset by the Red Scare, jailed dissidents, Prohibition, smoke-filled rooms, bomb-throwing terrorists, and the Klan, gingerly crossing modernity's threshold.

I just read this recently, and it's become on of my all time favorite history books. Not only is the wheeling and dealing at the nominating conventions fascinating, but the book is often laugh out loud funny -- surely a rare quality in history books, at least in my experience

The same author has also written books on 1932 and 1948 (which I've read), and 1960, which I plan to read soon.


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PJinAtl
Auburn Fan
Atlanta
Member since Nov 2007
9682 posts
 Online 

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
quote:

McCullough more on general history and presidential biography. His bio on John Adams is a good one.
McCullough's bio on the Wright Brothers is a good, yet fairly easy read. I also loved his book 1776.


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10
Antonio Moss
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Mar 2006
42060 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
Just finished The Gatekeepers which chronicles all of the White House Chiefs of Staff from the Nixon Administration to Obama.

Fascinating. Highly recommend.


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Andychapman13
LSU Fan
Member since Jun 2016
1951 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
The 4 Life and Times of LBJ books by Robert Caro. Best biographies I’ve ever read by a mile. As a conservative I hate the guy and what he did to US in the long run, but he was the ultimate player of the game, he was Machiavelli’s Prince!


bayoubengals88
Wisconsin Fan
LA
Member since Sep 2007
11346 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
I read one of those. It was fascinating. I never thought of a biography as a page turner until picking that one up.


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AUveritas
Auburn Fan
Member since Aug 2013
2038 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
The Great Upheaval


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theGarnetWay
South Carolina Fan
Washington, D.C.
Member since Mar 2010
19769 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
In the middle of Heirs of the Founders:




quote:

In the early 1800s, three young men strode onto the national stage, elected to Congress at a moment when the Founding Fathers were beginning to retire to their farms.

Daniel Webster of Massachusetts, a champion orator known for his eloquence, spoke for the North and its business class. Henry Clay of Kentucky, as dashing as he was ambitious, embodied the hopes of the rising West. South Carolina’s John Calhoun, with piercing eyes and an even more piercing intellect, defended the South and slavery.

Together these heirs of Washington, Jefferson and Adams took the country to war, battled one another for the presidency and set themselves the task of finishing the work the Founders had left undone. Their rise was marked by dramatic duels, fierce debates, scandal and political betrayal. Yet each in his own way sought to remedy the two glaring flaws in the Constitution: its refusal to specify where authority ultimately rested, with the states or the nation, and its unwillingness to address the essential incompatibility of republicanism and slavery. They wrestled with these issues for four decades, arguing bitterly and hammering out political compromises that held the Union together, but only just. Then, in 1850, when California moved to join the Union as a free state, “the immortal trio” had one last chance to save the country from the real risk of civil war. But, by that point, they had never been further apart.

Thrillingly and authoritatively, H. W. Brands narrates an epic American rivalry and the little-known drama of the dangerous early years of our democracy.


Really enjoying this book. It's basically about the most influential politicians that rose to prominence as the Founding Fathers had all retired or passed away. It's focus is on Henry Clay, John C Calhoun, and Daniel Webster as they and a few other prominent politicians sought to lead the US in what they thought was what the Founders intended. I'm just getting to the part about Texas and westward expansion.

It's amazing that the stuff they debated then is the same stuff we still debate today - tariffs/free trade, how active the US should be in world affairs/promoting democracy, slander during political campaigns, etc.
This post was edited on 7/16 at 9:03 pm


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10
tigahbruh
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since Jun 2014
860 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics

Great book for understanding American foreign policy.
Covers the major policy influences from the late 19th century to now.
His takes on Wolfowitz/Bush and Obama probably need more perspective, but the rest is very good and fairly objective.
Might change your views of JFK as being a peaceful President (His foreign policy was based on one of the most warlike philosophies in US history).


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
99000 posts

re: Suggestions on U.S. history/politics
quote:

1920 The Year of the Six Presidents: David Pietrusza - Amazon.com

quote:

The presidential election of 1920 was among history's most dramatic. Six once-and-future presidents-Wilson, Harding, Coolidge, Hoover, and Teddy and Franklin Roosevelt-jockeyed for the White House. With voters choosing between Wilson's League of Nations and Harding's front-porch isolationism, the 1920 election shaped modern America. Women won the vote. Republicans outspent Democrats by 4 to 1, as voters witnessed the first extensive newsreel coverage, modern campaign advertising, and results broadcast on radio. America had become an urban nation: Automobiles, mass production, chain stores, and easy credit transformed the economy. 1920 paints a vivid portrait of America, beset by the Red Scare, jailed dissidents, Prohibition, smoke-filled rooms, bomb-throwing terrorists, and the Klan, gingerly crossing modernity's threshold.

I just read this recently, and it's become on of my all time favorite history books. Not only is the wheeling and dealing at the nominating conventions fascinating, but the book is often laugh out loud funny -- surely a rare quality in history books, at least in my experience

The same author has also written books on 1932 and 1948 (which I've read), and 1960, which I plan to read soon.
Just finished a very similar book

Just Plain Dick: Richard Nixon’s Checkers Speech and the “Rocking, Socking” Election of 1952



Highly recommended as well.





RIP



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