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On. Thursday, SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey said the conference is looking into new helmet-communicat
© Vasha Hunt-USA TODAY Sports
On. Thursday, SEC Commissioner Greg Sankey said the conference is looking into new helmet-communication devices after Michigan got accused of stealing signs during games. ..
quote:

Greg Sankey has apparently looked into “helmet audio options” this year.

The SEC commissioner said on Thursday that the conference has looked into in-helmet communication devices, which are commonplace in the NFL. Currently, the NCAA does not allow in-helmet radios.

The topic of allowing radios in helmets has arisen this year after the Michigan sign-stealing saga, and Sankey said that “some of what’s happened this year has accelerated that conversation.” Without radios, players have to rely on coaches to give them signals for plays, giving the other team the chance to pick up those signals and anticipate a team’s next play.
(Saturday Down South)
Filed Under: SEC Football
Originally published on SECRant.com

Comments

6 Comments
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Then someone would find what frequency they were communicating on and listen in
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tketaco3 months
Could have won the 2012 BCSNCG with those.
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StrikeIndicator3 months
Student athlete staff will be reduced by 3/4. Maybe they can transition to onfield NIL assistants.
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MrAUTigers3 months
I am not sure how this would alleviate sign stealing. Very few college teams huddle anymore. There would be some kind of signs sent to the other 10 players on the field.
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POTUS20243 months
There is a zero cost way to not have your signs stolen. But sure let's have more costs that eventually get passed on to the fans.
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HubbaBubba3 months
LOL! Come on, now. 32 teams might spend $10k a season, at most, on these encrypted, wireless systems. The teams may have to add a penny to the beer prices. The real cost passed to fans are the ridiculous contracts to players and the huge sums added to the cost of products you buy to pay for all the advertisements.
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