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AeroFan
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since Jan 2017
68 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
We splurged on the private cabin w/ ensuite toilet and shower. This webpage has pics of our cabin:

Cabin Pics

We're also traveling pretty light with just carry-ons.


ZDub86
LSU Fan
Lake Charles
Member since Aug 2006
91 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
I know this will be a silly question, but I've never traveled to Europe or anywhere outside of the USA for this length of time... what is the best way to pay for stuff while in these countries? Should we try to avoid using debit/credit cards and just carry cash with this? Do I need to figure out the currency exchange rate? Will places accept US dollars? Again, stupid question but I am new to all of this.


03GeeTee
LSU Fan
Oklahomastan
Member since Oct 2010
2794 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
Credit card is best payment option. Just make sure that your credit card company doesn’t charge foreign transaction fees.


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mizslu314
Missouri Fan
Dirty STL
Member since Sep 2013
9052 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
Use credit card.


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weaveballs1
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jun 2010
2416 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
Look into the Chase Sapphire card. You will need cash for the places that don't accept cards, but I wouldn't carry an excess amount. When you use the ATM over there decline the conversion rate the machine gives you.
This post was edited on 10/11 at 1:54 am


Nole Man
Florida State Fan
Somewhere In Tennessee!
Member since May 2011
3627 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
quote:

Look into the Chase Sapphire card. You will need cash for the places that don't accept cards, but I wouldn't carry an excess amount. When you use the ATM over there decline the conversion rate the machine gives you.


^^^This.

The Chase Sapphire card is among the best to use when you travel to earn points that can be used for free travel (just don't carry that HUGE balance! )

There are ATMs everywhere.

People differ on this, but I like a stash of local currency when I first arrive in a country because I've seen ATMs be down, not where I needed it etc. Airports/Train stations have them of course, but I like to hit the ground running with maybe $50-$100 in local currency in my pocket (for drinks, snacks, tips, emergencies etc.). AND not always Euros. Here's why...

Speaking of which, let's talk local currencies. Austria, Czechia (yes that's what you call it now!) and Hungary are EU Countries BUT....

Austria is very "westernized" and using Euros is no problem. Czechia? Not so much. The "Crown" is their local currency. LINK Some hotels, shops and restaurants in Prague may accept Euros, but many only take Crowns. This may become more of an issue outside of touristy areas like Prague. The only official currency in Hungary is the Forint. As in Prague, you may find places that will take Euros, but you may not. Credit cards acceptance is pretty high in all these cities, just pays to have some local coin. But just remember not to get stuck with too much of it left as you leave (but your local bank could still help you exchange it when you got back).

Rick Steves On The Subject!



ZDub86
LSU Fan
Lake Charles
Member since Aug 2006
91 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
Thanks everyone!!


mizslu314
Missouri Fan
Dirty STL
Member since Sep 2013
9052 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
since its your first time, dont forget the rookie mistake of device chargers. purchase the outlet converter before you go over there if you haven't already, much cheaper.


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ZDub86
LSU Fan
Lake Charles
Member since Aug 2006
91 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
Please enlighten me on this outlet converter. Perhaps I can buy one on Amazon??


mizslu314
Missouri Fan
Dirty STL
Member since Sep 2013
9052 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
LINK

euro outlets are different from ours, so you can just plug devise chargers into any outlet, you have to use this.


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Nole Man
Florida State Fan
Somewhere In Tennessee!
Member since May 2011
3627 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
LINK


Most countries in Europe use a 2 prong converter. One item of note though is look at your device to make sure it has a UL rating where you can use a converter. Older hair dryers can be notorious for getting fried over there. Don't really need those those and every hotel I've ever been to had him.

"How To"!

"Keep in mind that most sockets in Europe have high levels of power (typically 220 volts at 50 cycles), twice the voltage of American power systems. It may be way too much for your appliance. Remember: an adapter plug doesn't convert the voltage".
This post was edited on 10/11 at 1:40 pm


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MarinaTigerEsq
Member since Aug 2019
378 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
ATMs are fine to use and generally give a good rate, but make sure to use a secure one. Try one in a high end hotel or in an enclosed area within a branch. Avoid the machines that face the street


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MarinaTigerEsq
Member since Aug 2019
378 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
REI is a good place to find a reliable converter, typically packaged with a variety of plugs. Amazon electronics can be hit or miss


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nctiger71
LSU Fan
North Carolina
Member since Oct 2017
523 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
quote:

Please enlighten me on this outlet converter.


We went to Europe (Poland) for the first time this summer. We thought we had bought the correct converter before we went. We bought a kit that had wall plugs for several different configurations.

But Poland, and I was told perhaps other former eastern block countries, uses a socket that also required an adapter for the converter. In addition to holes for the two round prongs to go into, there is a small rod coming out of the wall.

So we had to buy the white adapter with the notch in it; to fit over the small rod coming out of the wall socket.
The prongs on the tan converter fit into holes on the other side of the white adapter.
[/url][/img]

There are flat (American style) holes on the tan converter. My wife's curling iron still burned up despite the converter.
[/url][/img]


Heyndil
Member since Oct 2019
2 posts

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
All cities are perfect for traveling, besides I'd say each season has its own advantages. When I travel to a new location, I always rent a car in order to explore and discover all the beautiful places, for me it's the best option. So, highly recommend finding one of the best rental cars and start a journey.
This post was edited on 10/14 at 12:14 pm


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Pettifogger
Atlanta Braves Fan
Member since Feb 2012
55738 posts
 Online 

re: Prague/Budapest/Vienna
You can definitely buy an EU adapter on Amazon for cheap. People don't use the same terminology, but generally an adapter is a cheap item that simply lets you plug your stuff in. You can get a multi-country adapter that'll often have 2-4 USB ports as well for more money (20ish bucks) but a plain EU adapter is just a few dollars.

A converter generally means power conversion to allow you to use certain devices by altering the voltage. In my experience this really only comes up with hairdryers and straighteners or more pro electronics (not standard laptops, cameras, etc.) and my wife has always had a dual voltage straightener that works fine without one. Almost any hotel in these cities will have a hair dryer.

In short, you very likely don't need a converter, and I certainly didn't for tons of electronics and whatnot in all three of these cities.




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