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DavidTheGnome
Monroe
Member since Apr 2015
17808 posts

The case against dark matter
I don’t know nearly enough about this to speak intelligently but I have a hunch that when this is resolved we don’t actually find something we’re calling dark matter but rather it’s going to be a shift in our understanding/models/equations.

LINK

Albert Einstein’s theory of general relativity is just over 100 years old, and so far it has predicted the interaction between celestial objects and the space-time field very well. There are a few troublesome spots, however, in which the theory of general relativity doesn’t agree with quantum mechanics. These gaps have confounded researchers for decades, and have sprouted a handful of hypotheses attempting to explain the dissonance.

Dark matter and dark energy are the prevailing stand-in answers for this problem, but they are, as of yet, merely stand-ins. And there are some physicists that do not buy into these explanations. Erik Verlinde, a professor of science mathematics, and informatics at the University of Amsterdam, is one of them. He’s developing a theory that takes another look at the mechanics of gravity, and it seems to have struck a nerve in the world of physics.

Emergent gravity,” as Verlinde calls it, is the idea that gravity is not a fundamental governance of our universe, but instead a reaction to the makeup of a given environment. Rather than thinking of gravity as a fundamental force, something that “just is,” is it possible that gravity is actually the result of the positions of quantum bodies, similar to the way temperature is derived from the motions of individual particles?


TH03
Iowa State Fan
Dallas
Member since Dec 2008
160426 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

is it possible that gravity is actually the result of the positions of quantum bodies


Makes more sense than "it's just there"


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263
Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
73794 posts

re: The case against dark matter
Racist.


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322
TheHarahanian
LSU Fan
Duh
Member since May 2017
10768 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

against dark matter


Racist.


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150
DavidTheGnome
Monroe
Member since Apr 2015
17808 posts

re: The case against dark matter
LINK

Dark matter is a theorized form of matter that is believed to account for approximately 80% of the matter in the universe, and about a quarter of its total energy density. The majority of dark matter is thought to be non-baryonic in nature, possibly being composed of some as-yet undiscovered subatomic particles.[note 1] Dark matter has not been directly observed, but its presence is implied in a variety of astrophysical observations, including gravitational effects that cannot be explained unless more matter is present than can be seen. For this reason, most experts believe dark matter to be ubiquitous in the universe and to have had a strong influence on its structure and evolution. The name dark matter refers to the fact that it does not appear to interact with observable electromagnetic radiation, such as light, and is thus invisible (or 'dark') to the entire electromagnetic spectrum, making it extremely difficult to detect using usual astronomical equipment.[1]

The primary evidence for dark matter is that calculations show that many galaxies would fly apart instead of rotating, or would not have formed or move as they do, if they did not contain a large amount of unseen matter.[2] Other lines of evidence include observations in gravitational lensing,[3] from the cosmic microwave background, from astronomical observations of the observable universe's current structure, from the formation and evolution of galaxies, from mass location during galactic collisions,[4] and from the motion of galaxies within galaxy clusters. In the standard Lambda-CDM model of cosmology, the total mass–energy of the universe contains 4.9% ordinary matter and energy, 26.8% dark matter and 68.3% of an unknown form of energy known as dark energy.[5][6][7][8] Thus, dark matter constitutes 84.5%[note 2] of total mass, while dark energy plus dark matter constitute 95.1% of total mass–energy content.


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26
rmnldr
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
27220 posts

re: The case against dark matter
(no message)
This post was edited on 5/7 at 8:49 pm


DavidTheGnome
Monroe
Member since Apr 2015
17808 posts

re: The case against dark matter
Gravity doesn’t "pull" though, it makes objects "fall" towards each other.


Or I guess really I should say gravity is the effect of objects falling towards each other, it’s caused by mass warping spacetime.
This post was edited on 5/7 at 6:54 pm


theunknownknight
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Sep 2005
44518 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

Emergent gravity,” as Verlinde calls it, is the idea that gravity is not a fundamental governance of our universe, but instead a reaction to the makeup of a given environment. Rather than thinking of gravity as a fundamental force, something that “just is,” is it possible that gravity is actually the result of the positions of quantum bodies, similar to the way temperature is derived from the motions of individual particles?


I honestly thought this was common knowledge. Did we jump dimensions again?


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84
starsandstripes
Army Fan
Georgia
Member since Nov 2017
11897 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

Gravity doesn’t "pull" though, it makes objects "fall" towards each other.


This is so wrong. You should be banned.

quote:

Or I guess really I should say gravity is the effect of objects falling towards each other, it’s caused by mass warping spacetime.



Nonsense. There is space and there is time but there is no spacetime.


rmnldr
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
27220 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

Gravity doesn’t "pull" though, it makes objects "fall" towards each other.


Honestly, what’s the difference?


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50
DavidTheGnome
Monroe
Member since Apr 2015
17808 posts

re: The case against dark matter


rmnldr
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
27220 posts

re: The case against dark matter
Your explanation that it makes things fall together makes sense if you imagine the universe as if it’s a sheet of canvas and the sun is a bowling ball and the other planets are marbles but it really isn’t settled enough to describe it that simply. As far as I understand, it’s easy to demonstrate what we can observe through teaching it that way, but gravity acts much differently in reality.


DavidTheGnome
Monroe
Member since Apr 2015
17808 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

but gravity acts much differently in reality.



How so? On a quantum scale you’re right, it doesn’t behave how we think it should. Unifying relativity and quantum physics is the holy grail of physics, and when doing so I think we’ll discover the true nature of dark matter & energy.

But each time it’s been put to the test Einstein's theory on gravity has been shown to be true though, on a macro scale at least. Just last month the Hubble caught this, an Einstein ring caused by the mass of a galactic cluster bending light rays from distant galaxies. LINK

Image: https://img.purch.com/h/1400/aHR0cDovL3d3dy5zcGFjZS5jb20vaW1hZ2VzL2kvMDAwLzA3NS81ODAvb3JpZ2luYWwvaHViYmxlLXRlbGVzY29wZS1laW5zdGVpbi1yaW5nLXNpemVkLmpwZw==
This post was edited on 5/7 at 7:41 pm


DanW1
Clemson Fan
Member since Jan 2013
1075 posts

re: The case against dark matter
This video does a good job of showing how the warping of space & time makes things "fall".


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10
JackieTreehorn
USA Fan
Malibu
Member since Sep 2013
10867 posts

re: The case against dark matter


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60
rmnldr
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
27220 posts

re: The case against dark matter
Wouldn’t that suggest that gravity is pulling the space, time, and light to distort it? None of those components (even as abstract as space and time are) contain matter, so what exactly is happening there?

Unless there’s an underlying fabric that exists throughout the empty gaps in the universe to exist as the canvas for the marbles to pull on each other, I don’t see how our current understanding of gravitational effects can be correct.

And don’t get me wrong, I’m not remotely smart enough to actually be discussing this. I just don’t see how current models and theories can explain the phenomena we’ve observed from gravity.


mofungoo
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2012
4233 posts

re: The case against dark matter
M Theory and Superstring theory contain explanations for dark matter and dark energy.


NYNolaguy1
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
16915 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

You should be banned.


We need a hero right meow.

:sadface:


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52
Breesus
New Orleans Saints Fan
House of the Rising Sun
Member since Jan 2010
62210 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

don’t know nearly enough about this to speak intelligently


Would you mind putting this before every one of your posts. Thanks.


rmnldr
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2013
27220 posts

re: The case against dark matter
quote:

Would you mind putting this before every one of your posts. Thanks.


No


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