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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
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Johnny Nash, the pop and reggae singer whose “I Can See Clearly Now” topped the charts in the U.S. and UK in 1972, died Tuesday. He was 80.

His son, Johnny Nash Jr., confirmed the death to the Associated Press and said his father died of natural causes, at home in Houston. No specific cause of death was given.

Although he might be thought of as a one-hit wonder by many, Nash’s website refers to “I Can See Clearly Now” as the singer’s “comeback hit,” since the then-32-year-old had been recording, and occasionally charting, since the late 1950s, starting when he was 17.

Born in Houston, Texas, John Lester Nash, Jr. grew up singing in church. He happened upon the style that would provide his greatest success when he traveled to Jamaica in 1968, where he met Bob Marley, Peter Tosh and Bunny Livingston. He financed their recordings for his own label, JAD, without success. However, his move into the genre himself with “I Can See Clearly Now” — which he wrote and produced himself — was a huge success, going gold and providing him a four-week run at No. 1 in the States
"I Can See Clearly Now"



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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
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Johnny Bush, the country singer-songwriter best known for writing Willie Nelson's hit "Whiskey River," has died. He was 85.

Bush's manager confirmed his death to Rolling Stone and his date of death was listed as Oct. 16 on his website.

Born Johnny Bush Shinn III on Feb. 17, 1935 in Houston, the performer was known to his audiences as Johnny Bush due to a television announcer's flub when he was 17, his website states.

The entertainer got his start in the music industry thanks to Nelson, who helped him land a job as a drummer in Ray Price's band. His debut single, "Sound of a Heartache," was released in 1967 and received praise from Nelson, who described him at the time as a "great singing talent."

Bush penned "Whiskey River" in 1972, which became a global hit upon Nelson's release of it one year later on "Shotgun Willie."

The performer, who played the guitar, fiddle and the drums, was also known for his national hits "Undo the Right" and "You Gave Me a Mountain." The latter reportedly earned him the nickname of "Country Caruso"
You can definitely hear the influence of Ray Price in his voice

Johnny Bush - "Whiskey River"



PowerTool
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
Clicked the thread to see if Johnny Bush had been mentioned yet.


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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
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Spencer Davis, the veteran British rock musician renowned for hits that bore his name but he did not sing, died in a hospital Monday while being treated for pneumonia, his agent told the BBC.

While the Spencer Davis Group performed for decades, its biggest hits — including such frequently covered mid-1960s classics as “Gimme Some Lovin'” and “I’m a Man” — were sung not by Davis but a teenaged Steve Winwood, making the group, like the Dave Clark 5 and the J. Geils Band, one of several from the era named after a bandmember who was not the singer or frontman. The reason, bandmember Muff Winwood told Mojo in 1997, was because “Spencer was the only one who enjoyed doing interviews, so I pointed out that if we called it the Spencer Davis Group, the rest of us could stay in bed and let him do them.”
quote:

In 1963, he saw brothers Steve and Muff Winwood performing in a Birmingham pub and convinced them to form a band with him, with Steve’s soaring voice and rousing keyboard playing at the center. Performing a steady repertoire of R&B covers, the Spencer Davis Group quickly developed a following, performed frequently in London and signed with Fontana Records.

There, they released a string of Top 10 British hits — beginning with “Keep on Running” in 1966 and continuing with “Somebody Help Me,” “I’m A Man” and “Gimme Some Lovin’” in 1967; the latter two were significant hits in the U.S. as well and were later covered by Chicago and the Blues Brothers, respectively. The hits were all sung by Steve Winwood, whom many people naturally thought was Davis.

The Winwood brothers left the group in 1967 — Steve to form Traffic with guitarist Dave Mason and drummer Jim Capaldi; Muff to become a successful record executive — as did producer and cowriter Jimmy Miller, who worked with Traffic and later the Rolling Stones. Davis continued the group until 1969, reforming it in 1973 after he’d moved to California. Davis also worked as an A&R executive for Island Records in the 1970s.

He led various incarnations of the Spencer Davis Group, recording intermittently over the ensuing decades and touring regularly as recently as 2017.
"Gimme Some Lovin'"

"Keep On Running"

"I'm A Man"









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Kafka
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re: Endless Sleep - The Obituary Thread
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Musician, songwriter and producer Stan Kesler, a pivotal figure in the Memphis birth of rock 'n' roll whose keen ear, innovative playing and studio smarts enhanced the careers of such rock and soul legends as Jerry Lee Lewis, James Carr, Sam the Sham and Elvis Presley, has died.

Kesler, who had suffered from deteriorating health for some time, passed away Monday in a hospice facility in Murfreesboro, Tennessee, according to family members. He was 92, and the cause of death was bone cancer.

Although hardly a household name, Kesler made essential contributions to dozens of records that found their ways into the homes of music lovers around the world. He was a Zelig-like figure in Memphis music during the key decades when the city was a lodestone of rock-and-roll and rhythm-and-blues innovation: He wrote songs for Elvis, played bass on "Great Balls of Fire," produced "Wooly Bully," and engineered recordings at Goldwax, a label that never achieved the fame of Stax or Hi even as it produced music of comparable greatness.

"Guys like him were a big influence on me, because he was a bass player, a steel guitar player, an engineer, a producer, a songwriter — and that's the same way I've been able to make a living in music, that same model," said Memphis musician, composer, bandleader and Electraphonic Recording studio chief Scott Bomar. "He had success in all of it."

"He was such a big part of Memphis, most people don't even realize," said Grammy-winning Memphis producer and engineer Matt Ross-Spang, who has worked with Jason Isbell and John Prine. "I definitely looked up to him a lot. He was one of those guys who could do it all."

One of 10 children, Stanley Augustus Kesler was born in Abbeville, Mississippi, where music was a family affair.

As a boy, he learned to play guitar, mandolin and dobro while harmonizing with various family members. "When company would come," he told The Commercial Appeal in 2014, "my mother would say, ‘OK, boys, get your instruments now and sing some songs for Aunt Hattie and Uncle Dick.
quote:

At Sun, Kesler began working as an engineer, and soon established his bona fides as a musical jack-of-all-trades.

During the famous "Sun sessions" that launched Elvis Presley's career and ignited the Big Bang of modern rock 'n' roll, Elvis recorded two songs co-written by Kesler, "I'm Left, You're Right, She's Gone," and "I Forgot to Remember to Forget." A 1964 Beatles performance of the latter song, with George Harrison on lead vocals, appears on the compilation recording "Live at the BBC."
quote:

The Kesler-Elvis connection remained strong throughout the singer's career. In 1957, after Presley moved from Sun to RCA, Elvis recorded Kesler's composition, "Playing for Keeps." Another Kesler song, "Thrill of Your Love," appeared on the 1960 album "Elvis Is Back!," which was Presley's first post-Army LP.

Finally, during the 1969 sessions at Chips Moman's American Sound Studio in Memphis that revitalized the singer's career, Elvis recorded Kesler's "If I'm a Fool (for Loving You)."

"Most of my songs are the love songs, the hurting tear-jerkers," Kesler said in 2014.

During the heyday of Sun, Kesler played on records by Roy Orbison, Carl Perkins and Jerry Lee Lewis, including Lewis' epochal 1957 hit, "Great Balls of Fire." "He was one of the first two or three people to own an electric bass in Memphis, and play it on a record," said Bomar, also a bass player.
quote:

Some others who recorded Kesler songs include Marty Robbins, Johnny Cash, Wanda Jackson and John Prine.

Beyond country, rockabilly and rock, Kesler played a significant role in Memphis soul. One of Kesler's Sun colleagues, Quinton Claunch, later was a co-founder of the Hi and Goldwax record labels. Kesler joined Claunch at Goldwax, engineering many records that remain especially prized by soul connoisseurs, including 1967's "The Dark End of the Street" by James Carr.

At Goldwax, Kesler provided a direct although largely overlooked contribution to one of Memphis' greatest contributions to the music of the era: He organized the band of ace session musicians that became famous as the "Memphis Boys" after Moman lured them to his American studio, where they provided backing for Elvis, Neil Diamond, Dusty Springfield and many others.


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