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MSMHater
Houston Astros Fan
Houston
Member since Oct 2008
21544 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

The last book of the prequels either recently came out or will be released soon. I love that world


It did come out, and me to. I'm a bit depressed that I likely wont get to return to it. There are better individual characters out there than Royce and Hadrian. But as a duo, they are GOAT for me. Best (consistent) comedic dialogue in the genre.

The most recent series is just good (not great) to me, but it sets the table very well.
This post was edited on 6/19 at 5:25 pm


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Damn, I just saw the Foundation trailer - it looks awesome. That is hands down my favorite sci fi series I've read. May have to hit up those three again soon. The Mule is such a great character.

Trailer


Damn Good Dawg
Georgia Fan
Member since Feb 2011
47219 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
I almost bought the Foundation for an upcoming trip looking to scratch the Expanse itch until Book 9. But I ended up going with Revelation Earth and then downloaded the Three Body Problem because it was $3 on Amazon. Anyone read the latter 2? Or have anything else along the same path that the Expanse has?


auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

Or have anything else along the same path that the Expanse has


Stephen r Donaldson's gap series, Bujold's vorkosigan saga, and scalzi's old man's war series are all space operas that have some similar elements to the expanse.

If you are looking for the Firefly type story with a small crew of a ship getting involved in larger stories/battles then the Tales of the Ketty Jay series by Chris wooding would be a good fit, though it's more steampunk fantasy.


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
I just finiahed lord of light, i was confused as hell with the timing. Very interesting story, it almost feels like getting dropped into the crippled god without much explanation.

Definitely going to reread it at some point. The writing was tough to grasp - you dont really get much character but the scope and events were very interesting.

ETA: fun fact is that the fake movie that was cover for the cia rescue in argo was the failed attempt to make Lord of Light a movie
This post was edited on 6/22 at 10:02 pm


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Three body problem is great - book 2 / the dark forest is one if the coolest books ive read in the last couple years


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auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

just finiahed lord of light, i was confused as hell with the timing.


Yeah, given how you didn't like the time switches in one of the Lawrence jorg books, I was wondering how you'd like the dual timelines of Lord of light. If you read it again sometime I'd imagine it would flow easier once you know what is going on. And yeah, it's more cool setting and plot than character development, but I think Sam himself has a decent arc.

And I could see that with the Crippled God comparison, Lord of light is even more in media res than Erikson.

Just bought the first foundation book, guess I'll grab the first three body problem too since it's on sale for 3 bucks.
This post was edited on 6/22 at 10:12 pm


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Ya i didnt really get that we jumped back to the beginning after chapter 2 until i was im the last 1/3rd of the book. Definitely have to just figure it out and the "epicness" for lack of a better term in lord of light sort of compares to how big the battles and such were in The Crippled God.

I really love the idea of people meeting their "gods / makers" and seeing that they are just the same people as well. Those aspects of malazan and the lord of light i love - people who ascended to godhood.


auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

Those aspects of malazan and the lord of light i love - people who ascended to godhood.



Yeah, the technology creating religion aspect I think is one of the most interesting facets of the book. Most sci fi has the religions fighting technology, not embracing it. Dune and one of the short stories in George rr Martin's tuf voyaging book are the only other books I've read I can think of offhand that play with that dynamic.

I had the same issue as you my first read-through. I knew something was off when I got to the time shift, but I didn't figure out it was dual timelines until about halfway through the book myself. There are a bunch of subtle clues here and there that are obvious once you know, but tough to see until then.


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Ya - i think that is also part of what made hyperion so good. The religion was sort of embracing technology in that series as well with the whole crucifix thing and their massive fleet, etc.


auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Oh yeah, Hyperion is a great example of that, particularly in the second half of the series.


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Ya I need to finish the last book in that one at some point.

Also trying to get into Butcher and Sullivan soon. Still need to read Pratchett / Disc World and the Farseer stuff. Plus I just bought the gap cycle and have it on my desk.

So many books so little time



MDB
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2019
528 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Try the Rama series. The first book Rendevouz With Rama is kind of a stand alone but then the next four books take world building to the next level. Arthur C. Clarke can really spin a yarn.


auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

So many books so little time



On the bright side you have a continuous source of entertainment for a while.

Just reading the third book of the Paternus trilogy by Dyrk Ashton, it's quite good and reminds me of Lord of Light in a lot of ways, with two groups of gods fighting each other, gods mixed in with humans, and a ton of mythology thrown in for good measure. Maybe American Gods meets Lord of Light would be a good comparison.


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Where is the best place to start with Butcher? I've heard Storm Front is kind of mediocre - but is it necessary to start there, does the story keep building on the prior books or is it more standalone / different storylines?


auyushu
Auburn Fan
Surprise, AZ
Member since Jan 2011
7092 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
With butcher the storyline keeps building on previous books, particularly as you go along. Each book typically has a case/problem that is individual to that book, but stuff happens that builds on the overall storyline.

Storm front is one where you could probably skip it as long as you read a good synopsis of the plot, as nothing happens that directly impacts the overall plot, it just gives a bit of background to Dresden and introduces a couple side characters briefly. You could possibly skip the second one if you read a synopsis as well, as it doesn't impact the overall arching plot but it does give a bunch of character development between Dresden and a series long antagonist/sometime ally and two other side/main characters.
Butcher is also fairly good at giving background info/history inside the stories so I think you could follow along either way.

You'd definitely need to read all the books from grave peril (3rd book) on in order, as stuff happens in book 3 that has major effects on the entire storyline. The third book is where I personally found the books to get much better, with 4 and particularly 5 where it really starts to take off.

So if you want to get a feel for what the quality of the series will be like from the beginning you could start with book 3.
This post was edited on 6/24 at 1:51 pm


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
The Gap Cycle by Stephen R. Donaldson has been very intriguing through two books. The story is really fricked up, if I hadn't been prepared by the Greatcoats, I may not have been able to stick with it. But the books just keep having a perfect level of mystery and suspense that pulls me through.

It's hard to put a finger on what is drawing me in, there isn't a ton of action and I can't say I really like or identify with any of the characters, but if you can handle a pretty depressing and fricked up view of things people can do in certain situations, it has been a good read.


Sneaky__Sally
Alabama Fan
Member since Jul 2015
8454 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Double Post


But I decided to jump into Riyaria next as opposed to Butcher - seems like an easier jumping off point for me to just get the opening trilogy in Revelations (signed copies available on his website for the $40 set).

I'll probably go ahead and buy books 2 and 3 of Butcher to read while I'm reading other stuff. Decided to do a big Malazan re-read, so having Butchers stuff in there to help me break up the intensity and information overload of Malazan seems like a good plan.
This post was edited on 6/30 at 4:52 am


Tigris
Montana Fan
Mexican Home
Member since Jul 2005
10415 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
quote:

I just finiahed lord of light, i was confused as hell with the timing. Very interesting story, it almost feels like getting dropped into the crippled god without much explanation.

Definitely going to reread it at some point.


I've read Lord of Light more than any other sci-fi book, partly because of the structure which is not intuitive. There is a lot going on that Zelazny only hints at but that can be figured out. The clash of religions (hindu/buddhist/muslim/christian) that underlies it is interesting and the mythology as well. Neil Gaiman knew Zelazny and was influenced by him, American Gods especially feels like a Zelazny book and in fact has a scene that is an obvious nod to Lord of Light. There is a lot of old Zelazny stuff out there that is worth a read, he was one of the best. A few weeks ago I went through Creatures of Light and Darkness again which is always interesting. It really wasn't intended to be published but was more of an experimental exercise that people convinced him to turn into a book. For anybody who is a fan of Lord of Light it's worth reading, one of the most creative sci fi books I've come across.


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Damn Good Dawg
Georgia Fan
Member since Feb 2011
47219 posts

re: Sci-Fi/Fantasy Recommendation & Discussion Thread
Thanks! I read Old Man’s War and that one was great. Haven’t felt the desire to read Ghost Brigades though. I’ll have to check your other suggestion!
This post was edited on 6/30 at 10:45 am


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