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Kafka
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re: The Great American Songbook
Jimmy Scott - "Unchained Melody"

quote:

Jimmy Scott (born July 17, 1925, also known as "Little" Jimmy Scott) is an American jazz vocalist famous for his unusually high contralto voice, which is due to Kallmann's syndrome, a very rare genetic condition. The condition stunted his growth at four feet eleven inches until, at age 37, he grew another 8 inches to the height of five feet seven inches. The condition prevented him from reaching puberty, leaving him with a high, undeveloped voice, hence his nickname "Little" Jimmy Scott.


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
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re: The Great American Songbook


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
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re: The Great American Songbook


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
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107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook


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Kafka
USA Fan
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re: The Great American Songbook


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Tigerwaffe
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Orlando
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re: The Great American Songbook
Tom Leher for Kryssake:
LINK


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Kafka
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Member since Jul 2007
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re: The Great American Songbook


The Cops 'n Robbers - "I Could Have Danced All Night" (1965)

No this isn't the British Invasion thread. The Cops 'n Robbers were an obscure English R&B band in the Stones/Pretty Things mold who released a handful of sides and never had a hit. Their repertoire was firmly in the English blues tradition (they cut "St. James Infirmary") and they also covered Dylan's "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" (an excellent interpretation that predates Them's better known version, but that's a subject for another thread).

Somebody -- presumably their management -- got the bright idea for them to cover Lerner and Loewe's "I Could Have Danced All Night" from My Fair Lady. Completely atypical of their recorded output, it's a vaguely Latinish arrangement that even incorporates horns. It reminds me a bit of Brill Building pop, except that the lead singer sounds like he wants to break out and go totally James Brown on everybody.

Compare it to Jamie Cullum's version -- could Jamie have somehow heard the Cops 'n Robbers?


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Kafka
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I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
Bob Dylan ~ "Some Enchanted Evening"




Bob Dylan Looks To The Ageless American Songbook (NPR)

quote:

Bob Dylan's unusual new album Shadows in the Night consists of ten cover versions of standards from the American Popular Songbook including "Autumn Leaves" and "Some Enchanted Evening." Dylan is accompanied by a five-piece band on songs that usually use orchestral accompaniment, and the singer has said the recordings were done live in "one or two takes." Fresh Air rock critic Ken Tucker says Dylan both infuses the songs with his personality, while also allowing them to be heard anew.


Kafka
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Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
Mark Steyn, the world's greatest political columnist, is also a connoisseur of the GAS. To celebrate the Sinatra Centenary he is devoting a column a week to a Sinatra song. It's a great series, not only for longtime fans but also serves as an excellent intro/guide for newbs to the music of Ol' Blue Eyes

"It Was A Very Good Year"
quote:

Ervin Drake didn't care for rock'n'roll but he saw no reason why he couldn't crank out a "folk song". So he went into the room next to the publisher's office, sat down at the piano and wrote:

When I was seventeen
It Was A Very Good Year
It Was A Very Good Year for small town girls and soft summer nights
We'd hide from the lights
On the village green
When I was seventeen...


He finished the thing in ten minutes, although the central idea - life as a cellar of fine wine - had been kicking around in the back of his head for some time. It's not a folk song, or even a pseudo-folk song. It's what happens when a real songwriter tries writing a "folk" song.
quote:

Frank chanced to be driving home through the California desert to his home in Rancho Mirage. He had the radio on, and, of all unlikely things, the disk-jockey played a four-year old Kingston Trio album track: "It Was A Very Good Year".

It's an interesting lesson in how Frank thought about music. The Kingston Trio version sounds nothing like a Sinatra song, but he heard the possibilities in it - all the possibilities, indeed, that Bob Shane missed: the loves of one's life as a series of vintage wines, recollected as if by an old oenophile
quote:

It's about the memory of loves as different as great wines, as intoxicating and as impermanent, save for the lingering savor of a sweet taste just beyond your tongue. By 1965, Sinatra was the acknowledged master vintner of alcohol-infused imagery, from "You Go To My Head" to "One For My Baby", and, unlike Bob Shane, he heard the poetry in Ervin Drake's words. Of Ol' Blue Eyes' record, Shane said simply, "It fit him better than me." Well, yes. But not just because Frank's nailed more chicks. In the Shane version, it is, like many folkie songs of the era, a song about singing a song. Sinatra understood it's meant to be autobiography - not necessarily his but somebody's:

But now the days grow short
I'm in the autumn of the year
And now I think of my life as vintage wine from fine old kegs
From the brim to the dregs
It poured sweet and clear
It Was A Very Good Year.

This post was edited on 9/25 at 1:21 am


Dandy Lion
Georgia Fan
Lake Oconee
Member since Feb 2010
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re: The Great American Songbook


Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
quote:

Can´t Get Used to Losing You
Thanks for posting. I appreciate getting feedback every year or so.

But as I replied when someone else posted "CGUTLY" earlier in the thread:
quote:

That's a Doc Pomus-Mort Shuman song, so it really belongs more in this thread: Brill Building Rock: The Great Songwriters

I always meant to update that thread, but I never got around to it.
Unfortunately I never did get around to updating that thread, so it got locked...


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
Bump for Frank's 100th -- Happy birthday Blue Eyes!



"That's Life"

"Luck be a Lady"

"Young At Heart"

"All The Way"

"One For My Baby (and One More For The Road)"

quote:

Mark Steyn, the world's greatest political columnist, is also a connoisseur of the GAS. To celebrate the Sinatra Centenary he is devoting a column a week to a Sinatra song. It's a great series, not only for longtime fans but also serves as an excellent intro/guide for newbs to the music of Ol' Blue Eyes

"It Was A Very Good Year"
quote:

Ervin Drake didn't care for rock'n'roll but he saw no reason why he couldn't crank out a "folk song". So he went into the room next to the publisher's office, sat down at the piano and wrote:

When I was seventeen
It Was A Very Good Year
It Was A Very Good Year for small town girls and soft summer nights
We'd hide from the lights
On the village green
When I was seventeen...


He finished the thing in ten minutes, although the central idea - life as a cellar of fine wine - had been kicking around in the back of his head for some time. It's not a folk song, or even a pseudo-folk song. It's what happens when a real songwriter tries writing a "folk" song.
quote:

Frank chanced to be driving home through the California desert to his home in Rancho Mirage. He had the radio on, and, of all unlikely things, the disk-jockey played a four-year old Kingston Trio album track: "It Was A Very Good Year".

It's an interesting lesson in how Frank thought about music. The Kingston Trio version sounds nothing like a Sinatra song, but he heard the possibilities in it - all the possibilities, indeed, that Bob Shane missed: the loves of one's life as a series of vintage wines, recollected as if by an old oenophile
quote:

It's about the memory of loves as different as great wines, as intoxicating and as impermanent, save for the lingering savor of a sweet taste just beyond your tongue. By 1965, Sinatra was the acknowledged master vintner of alcohol-infused imagery, from "You Go To My Head" to "One For My Baby", and, unlike Bob Shane, he heard the poetry in Ervin Drake's words. Of Ol' Blue Eyes' record, Shane said simply, "It fit him better than me." Well, yes. But not just because Frank's nailed more chicks. In the Shane version, it is, like many folkie songs of the era, a song about singing a song. Sinatra understood it's meant to be autobiography - not necessarily his but somebody's:

But now the days grow short
I'm in the autumn of the year
And now I think of my life as vintage wine from fine old kegs
From the brim to the dregs
It poured sweet and clear
It Was A Very Good Year.




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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
The soul duo Sam and Bill (not Dave) take a crack at the Sinatra standard in 1966:

Sam and Bill - "Fly Me To The Moon"

Image: https://i.imgur.com/zykXtGt.jpg


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Kafka
USA Fan
I am the moral conscience of TD
Member since Jul 2007
107540 posts

re: The Great American Songbook
Hoagy Carmichael - "Georgia On My Mind"
quote:

Hoagland Howard Carmichael was an American composer, singer and actor who is referenced in two James Bond novels as a good representation of what agent 007 looks like.

In Casino Royale, it is Vesper Lynd who first makes this connection.

‘He is very good-looking. He reminds me rather of Hoagy Carmichael, but there is something cold and ruthless in his …’

Bond is told of this, and later muses:

As he tied his thin, double-ended, black satin tie, he paused for a moment and examined himself levelly in the mirror. His grey-blue eyes looked calmly back with a hint of ironical inquiry and the short lock of black hair which would never stay in place slowly subsided to form a thick comma above his right eyebrow. With the thin vertical scar down his right cheek the general effect was faintly piratical. Not much of Hoagy Carmichael there, thought Bond, as he filled a flat, light gunmetal box with fifty of the Morland cigarettes with the triple gold band.

In Moonraker, Gala Brand also makes the connection:

Rather like Hoagy Carmichael in a way. That black hair falling down over the right eyebrow. Much the same bones. But there was something a bit cruel in the mouth, and the eyes were cold.
Ian Fleming, Hoagy Carmichael



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