Just how often do cops raid the wrong house? | TigerDroppings.com

Posted byMessage
GonzoLeslie
Alabama Fan
Alabama
Member since Sep 2011
3646 posts

Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

MINNEAPOLIS (CN) - After breaking down doors and shooting the family dog, a drug task force forced handcuffed children "to sit next to the carcass of their dead and bloody pet for more than an hour," and kept searching even after they knew they were raiding the wrong house, the family claims in Federal Court.
All nine occupants of the home, including three children, sued the officers, the state and Ramsey County in Federal Court.
Defendants include members of the Dakota County Drug Task Force, the St. Paul Police force, and a DEA agent.
Lead plaintiff Roberto Franco claims the task force raided the wrong house: that they should have gone next door.
Franco claims that Task Force Officer Shawn Scovill, who orchestrated the raid, "provided false information to a Minnesota District Court judge in order to obtain a search warrant. Defendant Scovill lied when he informed the District Court judge who reviewed Scovill's search warrant application that Scovill had obtained information from the confidential informant that the plaintiffs' home was the properly targeted house and that the address and the identity of the individuals who resided therein were the plaintiffs."
The complaint adds: The search warrant specifically named Rafael Ybarra as the intended target suspect. Plaintiff Roberto Franco was not named in the search warrant, nor was any person who lived in the raided house named in the search warrant.
"There was never a mention of plaintiff, Roberto Franco, in any documents related to the raid search warrant.
"Plaintiff, Roberto Franco, had never been discussed or considered a suspect by law enforcement, Scovill or any of the defendants directly involved or indirectly involved in the raid, relative to any alleged involvement by Franco in any distribution of contraband prior to the wrong house raid."
Ybarra lived next door, Franco says. He says Ybarra's name, not his, was on the warrant.
The task force broke down the Francos' doors, "negligently raided the home of plaintiffs, by raiding the wrong home and physically brutalizing all the above-named occupants of said house," the complaint states.
Even after learning that they were in the wrong house, the complaint states, the drug busters stayed in the Francos' home and kept searching it.
They "handcuffed all of the inhabitants of the plaintiffs' home except plaintiff Analese Franco who was forced, virtually naked, from her bed onto the floor at gunpoint by officers of the St. Paul Police Department SWAT team and officers of the St. Paul Police Department."
The complaint states: "Upon forcibly breaching the plaintiffs' home, defendants terrorized the plaintiffs at gun and rifle point.
"Each plaintiff was forced to the floor at gun and rifle point and handcuffed behind their backs.
"Defendants shot and killed the family dog and forced the handcuffed children to sit next to the carcass of their dead pet and bloody pet for more than an hour while defendants continued to search the plaintiffs' home."
One child "was kicked in the side, handcuffed and searched at gunpoint," the family says.
Another child, a girl, "a diabetic, was handcuffed at gunpoint and prevented by officer from obtaining and taking her medication, thus induced a diabetic episode as a result of low-blood sugar levels."
During their illegal search, the officers found a .22 revolver in the basement bedroom of plaintiff Gilbert Castillo. The cops "improperly attributed the possession of said weapon to plaintiff Roberto Franco and arrested him."
"Plaintiff Roberto Franco was wrongfully convicted of the alleged offense and is currently incarcerated with the Minnesota Department of Corrections," the complaint states.
In summary, the complaint states: "Defendants improperly and illegally remained in the home of the plaintiffs searching and seizing items despite the fact that they had learned that they had raided the wrong home.
"Defendant, Shawn Scovill intentionally perjured himself in his sworn testimony on the witness stand at the suppression hearing and at the trial of plaintiff, Roberto Franco.
"Defendant, Shawn Scovill intentionally misrepresented the facts of the criminal case against Roberto Franco in all documents following the arrest of, plaintiff Roberto Franco.
"Defendant Shawn Scovill intentionally misrepresented the facts in the State's criminal against plaintiff Gilbert Castillo when he said that Gilbert Castillo did not state that the confiscated weapon belonged to Gilbert Castillo.
"Defendant Shawn Scovill perjured himself when he testified in the suppression hearing and at the trial of plaintiff Roberto Franco that Scovill had received a text message from the confidential informant which stated the address of the house to be raided was the house address that Scovill had placed on the search warrant.
"Defendants had identified and raided the wrong house."
The parents say the three children suffered traumatic emotional and personal injuries that require therapy.
They demand $10 million for civil rights violations and $20 million in punitive damages.
They are represented by Scott Selmer with Conner, McAlister & Selmer, of Minneapolis.







Back to top
Share:
Elleshoe
Southeastern LA Fan
Founder of the Boxtard Nation
Member since Jun 2004
121663 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


cops generally aren't the smartest alive. do you expect them to actually comprehend Constitutional Law?





Back to top
LakeViewLSU
New Orleans Saints Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jun 2009
8405 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Shoot high, but they will settle for about half a mil.





Back to top
  Replies (0)
XxxSpooky1
LSU Fan
A place in SE La
Member since Sep 2007
4239 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Not very often to be honest.





Back to top
  Replies (0)
Helo
LSU Fan
Orlando
Member since Nov 2004
3593 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Happened here in Central FL just a few days ago.

LINK

quote:

LAKE COUNTY, Fla. - Lake County Sheriff's Office deputies shot and killed a man they assumed was an attempted murder suspect on Sunday, but they now know they shot the wrong man.

In the early-morning hours, deputies knocked on 26-year-old Andrew Lee Scott's door without identifying themselves as law enforcement officers. Scott answered the door with a gun in his hand.






Back to top
Vince
Auburn Fan
Danziger Bridge
Member since Nov 2009
2223 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

cops generally aren't the smartest alive.

It would be great if they (cops) knew half as much about the legal system as they think they do.






Back to top
GonzoLeslie
Alabama Fan
Alabama
Member since Sep 2011
3646 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


LINK

interesting interactive map






Back to top
  Replies (0)
braindeadboxer
LSU Fan
Utopia
Member since Nov 2011
5015 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


The smell of donuts is probable cause. Therefore they were justified.





Back to top
  Replies (0)
Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
71825 posts
 Online 

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Tuna fish sandwich























































Oh sorry wrong thread






Back to top
  Replies (0)
LSUwag
LSU Fan
St Augustine Beach
Member since Jan 2007
6440 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Not often. I doubt the tens of thousands of good searches make the media.

That being said, these recent mistakes are unacceptable.






Back to top
Gulf Coast Tiger
LSU Fan
Pass Christian
Member since Jan 2004
4665 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Not often .





Back to top
  Replies (0)
TDsngumbo
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2011
5139 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Anytime they arrest, shoot, or kill a black guy. They always seem to get the wrong house in those instances...





Back to top
Rickety Cricket
Navy Fan
Premium Member
Member since Aug 2007
33922 posts
 Online 

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

and kept searching even after they knew they were raiding the wrong house

Once their ineptitude is made clear, they'll tear everything up looking for some reason to arrest the innocent and misidentified homeowner.






Back to top
  Replies (0)
magildachunks
Member since Oct 2006
11055 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Here's a local one from that map posted:

quote:

Glen Williams

In June 1988, police in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana conduct a 2 a.m. raid on the home of Glen Williamson. When Williamson points out that the name on the warrant reads "Glen Williams," the deputy merely adds an "on" to the end of the last name, and arrests him anyway. Williamson spends a night in jail before police concede their mistake and release him.



Wow. I know it's 1988, but that is ballsy by the cop.


ETA: Does this man deserve the death penalty?


quote:

Officer Ron Jones

On December 26, 2001, police in Prentiss, Mississippi serve search warrants on two apartments in a yellow duplex. One apartment is occupied by Jamie Smith, named in the warrant as a "known drug dealer." The other is occupied by Cory Maye, who has no criminal record, and isn't named in the warrants.

At the time of the raid, Maye is asleep with his 18-month old daughter. After trying and failing to kick down the front door, police move to the back, and break down the door to Maye's bedroom. Maye is lying in the dark with his daughter, clutching a handgun. According to his trial testimony, he is unaware that the men breaking into his home are the police.

Officer Ron Jones is the first police officer to enter. Maye fires three times, striking Jones once. Maye's bullet hit Jones in the abdomen, just below his bulletproof vest. Jones dies a short time later. Police find only traces of marijuana in Maye's apartment, after first telling reporters they'd found no drugs at all.

Officer Jones was the only officer who conducted the investigation leading up to the raid, and apparently kept no notes of his investigation. According to the district attorney and prosecutor in the Maye case, all evidence of the investigation leading to the raid on Maye's home "died with Officer Jones," who is also the son of the Prentiss police chief.

In January 2004, Cory Maye was convicted of capital murder for the death of Jones, and sentenced to die by lethal injection.



This post was edited on 7/19 at 9:00 am


Back to top
beaver
USA Fan
The 755 Club
Member since Sep 2009
38570 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


Cops are dumbasses...I've never had a terrible experience w one but generally the ones I know are fricking idiots...they couldn't get into college so they became cops





Back to top
TDsngumbo
LSU Fan
Member since Oct 2011
5139 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

the ones I know are fricking idiots...they couldn't get into college so they became cops


This!






Back to top
  Replies (0)
RebFeBrees
Ole Miss Fan
Kansas City, Missouri
Member since Dec 2009
13596 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

On December 26, 2001, police in Prentiss, Mississippi serve search warrants on two apartments in a yellow duplex. One apartment is occupied by Jamie Smith, named in the warrant as a "known drug dealer." The other is occupied by Cory Maye, who has no criminal record, and isn't named in the warrants.

At the time of the raid, Maye is asleep with his 18-month old daughter. After trying and failing to kick down the front door, police move to the back, and break down the door to Maye's bedroom. Maye is lying in the dark with his daughter, clutching a handgun. According to his trial testimony, he is unaware that the men breaking into his home are the police.

Officer Ron Jones is the first police officer to enter. Maye fires three times, striking Jones once. Maye's bullet hit Jones in the abdomen, just below his bulletproof vest. Jones dies a short time later. Police find only traces of marijuana in Maye's apartment, after first telling reporters they'd found no drugs at all.

Officer Jones was the only officer who conducted the investigation leading up to the raid, and apparently kept no notes of his investigation. According to the district attorney and prosecutor in the Maye case, all evidence of the investigation leading to the raid on Maye's home "died with Officer Jones," who is also the son of the Prentiss police chief.

In January 2004, Cory Maye was convicted of capital murder for the death of Jones, and sentenced to die by lethal injection.



Wow I remember this. frickin awful story.






Back to top
FelicianaTigerfan
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2009
14339 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

raid the wrong house


quote:

Helo


quote:

deputies knocked on 26-year-old Andrew Lee Scott's door


Not the same thing






Back to top
  Replies (0)
LsuTool
Columbia Fan
Suck that tiger Tool, B
Member since Oct 2009
22682 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


damn, hope they get paid





Back to top
  Replies (0)
alajones
LSU Fan
Hell
Member since Oct 2005
21889 posts

re: Just how often do cops raid the wrong house?


quote:

During their illegal search, the officers found a .22 revolver in the basement bedroom of plaintiff Gilbert Castillo. The cops "improperly attributed the possession of said weapon to plaintiff Roberto Franco and arrested him."
"Plaintiff Roberto Franco was wrongfully convicted of the alleged offense and is currently incarcerated with the Minnesota Department of Corrections," the complaint states.
How the hell does this happen? How was this not thrown out within a couple of hours after contacting an attorney?






Back to top
  Replies (0)


Back to top