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Tigers13
LSU Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2005
1378 posts

Boxwood Blight
So I planted 20 small Japanese Dwarf boxwoods in front my house in April. They looked to be doing well until recently when one's leaves started turning brown. I trimmed off all the effected branches but then started noticing the same on the adjacent plant. Should I pull these plants out to save the others or is there something I can treat them with. Also, I have azaleas behind the boxwoods which are full of moths so could this be a moth larvae issue or is it something else? I'm a home and garden novice so any help/suggestions is much appreciated.


FlyinTiger93
LSU Fan
Member since May 2010
1840 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
How often are you watering? They are very suspect to canker and fungal issues. Should have planted Wintergreen boxwood.


Tigers13
LSU Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2005
1378 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
Since they started showing problems, I’ve been watering a couple of times/week. Should I water more?


FlyinTiger93
LSU Fan
Member since May 2010
1840 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
Less. Turning yellow does not always mean they need more water. You may be making things worse. 2-3 days a week, tops.


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Havoc
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2015
10477 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
Any presence of black moldy looking stuff on the leaves that can be wiped off with your finger?


Tigers13
LSU Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2005
1378 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
No


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Tigers13
LSU Fan
New Orleans
Member since Feb 2005
1378 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
quote:

Less. Turning yellow does not always mean they need more water. You may be making things worse. 2-3 days a week, tops


When it first started, I wasn't really watering at all. I started watering a couple times/week once the leaves on the first plant started turning brown.


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TigerAlum1982
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1168 posts

re: Boxwood Blight
Here is an article from the LSU Ag Center. The Author, Dr. Raj Singh, helped us save our Japanese Maple. He actually came over to my house to look at it. LSU Ag Center

quote:

Beginning in the fall of 2011, Raj Singh, the LSU AgCenter’s “plant doctor,” began seeing an increase in the number of calls about damage to boxwoods. “It actually started when I received four samples of plants showing damage,” Singh said. “Two were from homeowners, and two came from commercial landscapes.”


quote:

After several attempts, Singh said, he was not able to detect or isolate Phytophthora from the roots and crowns of the infected tissue. “I then started working with the tissue taken from the transition zone of healthy and dead twigs,” Singh said. “After about five days, a fungus was consistently isolated from the infected twigs.” Singh said he tentatively identified the fungus as Colletotrichum. Later on, DNA testing confirmed this fungus as Colletotrichum theobromicola. “Since this is considered a new disease in boxwoods, we’re calling it stem canker of boxwood caused by Colletotrichum theobromicola,” Singh said.


quote:

The next big step is to figure out how to manage this disease, Singh said. He believes systemic fungicides would be more effective than contact fungicides. “The timing of fungicide application also will be a crucial factor in disease management,” he said. In landscapes where the disease is already present, surface disinfection of pruning and cutting tools is important to reduce the spread of the disease. Removing dead and dying twigs and avoiding unnecessary injury also is important to avoid infection.





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