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Bleeding purple
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Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
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Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


I am going to try to put as much of the information that I have learned over the last several years in this thread. Bear with me as I add info over the next few days. If anyone has any info to contribute please feel free.

The Problem Defined
Hogs are a problem that is not going away. They reproduce at a rate that is impossible to control. The destruction they do to agricultural lands, waterways, roads, and private property costs millions of dollars annually. The also pose a significant highway hazard due to their high numbers and compact low the ground size. When you hit a deer you have a good chance of winning because they get thrown from their spindly legs. When you hit a hog you have a good chance of major damage and loss of control as they ramp under the car. The environmental impact of these opportunistic pack animals is likely not fully understood. They put pressure on native species and as omnivores (eat anything) they provide competition for food sources and often out compete native species. They decimate snake and amphibian populations, destroy nests of ground nesting birds, and can and will predate smaller weaker mammals including fawns. Although they contain a large portion of highly nutritious meat and fat, they are not targeted by many predators. Coyotes will take some of the smaller pigs, large birds will take the shoats, gators and cougars will take full grown pigs but the impact on the population is minimal.

Hogs are uniquely adapted to surviving. They have coarse hair and thick skin, a nose better than a deer, good color eyesight (despite popular belief), good hearing (despite popular belief), are able to climb steep grades, swim easily, and have the power and size to barrel through common fencing like it was made of straw. Larger hogs develop a thickened area over the shoulders often called a shield from fighting and rubbing on trees. This shield is not a mysterious impenetrable bullet proof area but it does make passing an arrow, knife, underpowered ammunition, or frangible ammunition very difficult. Hogs are smart and are considered to be one of the smartest animals on the planet behind humans, some apes, and dolphins.

Due to their intelligence, ability to learn new patterns, lack of significant predators, and omnivorous habits, hogs move at their will. In my opinion patterns are only established by the hog’s convenience. They are lead by their stomachs, need for water and mud, and human pressure. They will change patterns at random or due to human pressure. However, if there is a food source, they will be back.

Reproduction capabilities are astounding. They can begin breeding at only 6 months old but most wait until 1 yr. They will bear litters of 6-12 piglets at a time dependent on available food sources. The litters will consist of slightly more females than males normally. The gestation period allows for as many as three litters in a calendar year but most only drop two litters during that time. All of this means that the population growth is exponential.

Hogs often move in groups and are often divided by sex and age.

Large adult boars 200 lb plus often are solitary and can be aggressive to other hogs running them off of food sources. They have been known to come to wounded prey calls and are considered predatory on small mammals.

Bachelor groups will often consist of 4-6 males all of the same apparent age. These are normally seen in the 50-150 lb range. They are easily trapped and if you are patient you can sometimes line up a shot with a FMJ round to punch 2 or three at a time with one shot.

Solitary Sow and piglets. In this case the piglets are often "stripers" only being a week or two old and still having stripes down their backs. Sometimes two sows with piglets of the same age will group together. The sows are very protective at this stage and will charge all intruders including boars, deer, coons, humans. The piglets are very committed to mom at this age and will actually come back out and try to feed off of her after she has been shot and is dead. Although it seems contrary to the rules of an ethical hunter, exterminating the piglets if this occurs is an important part of population control. Those piglets will be 50-60 lbs in 6 months and having their own litters. At this stage sows and piglets are very attracted to mineral licks especially sweet mineral blocks. These are hard to trap as the piglets squeeze through small openings and the sows are so protective they rarely enter traps.

Large family groups are also very common. In these groups you will find a matriarch sow 150lb, 2-3 younger sows 60-100lb, 2-3 younger boars 50-100 lb, and a collection of shoats and piglets. Rarely will the piglets in these groups be less than 2-3 weeks old. These are very trappable groups until they get educated. I have seen a matriarch sow stand at the entrance to a trap and run off all pigs trying to enter. In this case the sow must die.


Hog and Human Interaction

Hogs almost always will flee from humans directly trying to interact with them or when they get too close. They will get accustom to farm workers, and ranchers, and their trucks often staying in a field when they hear a similar truck but run if they hear a strange vehicle like an ATV. However, when they don't run you need to able to take evasive actions or kill the bastards.

Wounded boar can and will try to attack you. Sows with piglets can and will charge. Trapped pigs will try to attack you through the pen/trap. I have had several kill them selves by breaking their necks on T posts in our traps when charging me. I have had several traps made of 10 gauge steel cattle panels bent all out shape due to 200 lb plus hogs. This applies to a pig that feels it has not other option to escape, also. If you corner one you better is ready to fight.

Many people will describe a hog or group of hogs "trying to get them". In my experience though, a group of hogs startled will take off in every direction at once crashing through whatever is in the way. This is especially true if they are all large or adult hogs and if the encounter is in the woods versus in an open field. Piglets will usually just run back to the trail they came in on. That does not mean pigs pulling a Chinese fire drill are not dangerous especially in the dark. A 150-200 lb hog mistakenly running into you is like a college DB hitting you below the knee at full speed. Once they do run into you they may or may not attack while you are on the ground.

Hogs have large sharp tusks. Both boars and sows have tusks but boar’s tusks are usually longer. The upper and lower tusks rub against each other when the mouth is closing causing them to be self sharpening. When scared or angry they will snap the upper and lower jaws together creating a menacing sound. I have cut my jeans and thigh while loading a dead pig when the head flopped funny and hit me. I sliced my hand while scrubbing a skull for European mount (picture below) by simply sliding my finger down the wet tusk. . They have strong thick heads and bodies built for forward ramming. They seemingly feel no pain in their noses or just don't care as I have seen them repeatedly ram steel traps with their faces.






This post was edited on 10/9 at 1:26 pm



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Bleeding purple
TCU Fan
Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
20947 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Hog hunting

Well if you read the above info you know that hogs can be formidable animals to hunt. They are lead by their stomachs though and will return to food sources regularly. They also have some predictability in the fact that light rains will get them up on fields to root the insects and worms out of the ground and will also turn them to wallows that they will revisit over and over again. Hogs will avoid the heat as much as possible as they do not sweat. Look for them to be most active dusk till dark, on overcast and rainy days, and inside of deep woods near water mid day.

Despite good eyesight which is color vision unlike deer, they spend most of their time with their noses buried in the ground. This combined with a generally short stature and stiff downward angled necks preventing an upward gaze makes the likelihood of being spotted at a distance low. Regardless good color appropriate camouflage is important if you plan to hunt up close.

Although they have good hearing, traveling in groups where individual pigs are crashing through brush makes it difficult for them to distinguish natural outdoor sounds as abnormal. Don't bang metal together or make other un-natural sounds though.

Weapon choice is dependent on the user and the desire to collect meat from the hogs.

Bladed Weapons
Bow and arrow are certainly sufficient to kill hogs. Due to the slightly smaller and more forward vitals with thicker more muscular shoulders and the possibility of a substantial "shield" a quartering away shot is strongly recommended. Hogs are tough and will go a long way with only a single or even with a double lung shot. For a quick kill put the arrow through the heart. I prefer a trochar tip for hogs versus a cut on contact tip. I also prefer fixed not mechanical broadheads, but that debate is for elsewhere. Hogs do not leave a good blood trail frequently. The idea of "bled like a stuck pig" is a bit of a farce. The thick fat layers, poor penetration of arrows which often fail to exit and the shot angles all contribute to this issue. Since they don't really have the ability to look up well, you don't have to be all that high and ground hunting is possibility. However, this makes pass through shots frequently miss the heart and the exit wound is too high to give a reliable blood trail.

Picture of the thickened hardened scar and fat layer known as the "shield" lying over the substantial shoulder muscles and shoulder blade on a approximately 200 lb boar. The knife blade is 1.5 inches thick.



When using a knife, or spear the same angle of insertion is recommended. However an upward angled knife thrust from the front arm pit aiming at the opposite side ear will hit the heart in most cases. A good 6" or longer sturdy blade with at full tang to prevent your hand from slipping is the tool of choice.



On a ground level quartering away shot aim for the yellow dot.

On an elevated quartering away shot aim for the pink dot

On a ground level perpendicular shot aim for midway up the black line

On an elevated perpendicular shot aim for the orange dot.


Firearms
For firearms pretty much anything will work as long as your shot placement is true.

If you want to retain the meat and do not want to track the hog I HIGHLY recommend head shots, specifically ear hole shots. As you can see in this photo and referring to the above picture the brain is located just behind the eye at the lower front margin of the ear. Put a bullet here and they fall in their tracks.

Bullet hole in skull exposing brain cavity on a 245 lb boar I shot with .308 at 50 yards. The bullet did not exit. Notice the cheek bone is gone which forms the floor of the eye socket or orbit. The large depression at the top of the skull behind and above the eye is the attachment o the masseter muscle that closes the jaw. Also notice that the space directly between the eyes is not brain and instead is the back portion of the sinuses. To hit brain with the pig facing you straight on and head slightly down in their normal posture, you need to aim just above and between the eyes. A 22LR or pistol shot to that spot may not penetrate the skull and instead deflect off the skull up and behind the hog.


For head shots you can use just about any round you want. 22LR will easily kill even large hogs if you hit them in the brain. Once again I recommend non FMJ bullets.

For body shots on adult hogs that are 60 lb plus I recommend .30 cal minimum and soft point, hollow point, or ballistic tip ammo. I shoot a .308 with 150 grain PSP core lock and have never hit a hog in the vitals that did not die. I have seen some killed with .223 and 5.56 but I have also seen some seeming hit well run off. Body shots should be aimed at hitting the heart. Use the same angles listed above in associated with the picture.

If you are wanting to shoot lots of hogs in a big group and don't care to recover the hogs or meat body shots with FMJ bullets will pass right through in most cases and may hit additional hogs. A semi-auto large capacity weapon is your friend here. For cheap hog killing I recommend an SKS or AK chambered in 7.62 x 39 with either FMJ or JHP wolf ammo. If the hog is hit in the vitals or gut they will usually die. I have seen one hog frequent a feeder for 9 days with his intestines hanging out. So gut shot hogs may take a while.

Shotguns are another option. Slugs are clearly powerful enough for a hog.
Buckshot down to #4 buck is a good option also and if you need to hit lots of hogs in a tight group (at a feed location) a short barrel, semi-auto, high capacity, 12 gauge loaded with 15 pellet 00 buck is great from a 30 yard distance. I have killed many with 2 3/4" #2 steel shot out of my 12 gauge Benelli Nova while duck hunting at ranges up to 25 yards. I have killed even more in traps with 2 3/4 #8 lead 12 gauge from 10-15 feet. The damage of a head shot at that range is simply shock and awe.

Dog hunting

I have been on one dog hog hunt. It was fun but I am not sure I can add much on this subject. My one word of caution is to make sure you know the guys you are going with and make sure if there are firearms involved you trust those persons handling the guns.

maybe someone else can add more info



This post was edited on 10/9 at 4:37 pm


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Bleeding purple
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Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Locating the hogs

Frequently this is not a problem. If you want to scout new property though, or set up a stand to hunt them from, my advice is first find a water source. If you have a year round supply of water located in or surrounded by thick mature woods offering lots of shade you will find hogs. They like to lounge in tall grass and reeds, under low hanging limbs like those found on cedar trees, and against creek banks, all of which offer shade and proximity to water mid day. Look for pine trees, cedar trees, and creosote poles with rub marks on them along the edge of waterways. They will rub these to cover themselves in volatile chemicals found there helping keep bugs away. They will also rub them to push the mud down in their coat creating a natural sunscreen and skin protective layer from bugs. I have seen 12" trees whittled down to twigs due to rubbing. Big boar will also make a rub similar to what a buck makes where the bark looks shredded. These are usually on smaller 1-2" diameter saplings and usually near or in a bedding area. They drag their tusks up and down creating these rubs. Sometimes the rubs from a boar seem way too high to have been made by anything but Hogzilla but that is because they bent the sapling over to make the rub. Hogs tend to follow set trails and have no issues with those trails running through briars, blackberry, plum thickets, and other thorny plants. Their trails often have low hanging cover over the top to the point that the trails will look like rabbit trails. Deer will often use the same trails but rarely go under such low obstructions. Hogs will actively push vegetation like briars, out of their way only to have it fall back in the trail as they pass. Although, you may find coarse black hair on a barbed wire fence, finding a mud mark on the lower strand of barbed wire is more common for hog crossings. Hog tracks are more rounded on the front and the toes more split open than deer tracks and unless it is a very large print from a solitary boar, you will likely find many hog tracks in a single area. Finding fresh rooting on a field or in the woods under oak trees is a sure sign of hogs. They sometimes will graze on fresh growth just like deer however.

Hog track

Hog rooting

Hog wallow


Hog Trapping

There are several ways to trap hogs. Basically though it is limited to snares and some form of solid trap.

General trapping info

The most important thing to remember when trapping is location. Finding the right combination of high catch probability and easy access is sometimes difficult. Pigs can be caught out in the middle of 100 acre hay field. However, your traps will be MUCH more productive if you place them where the pigs are already moving. Take the time to scout an area and place traps no more than 50 yards from active hog trails or rooting. Always place traps against or inside of the wood line if possible. Always try to place traps where there will be afternoon shade during hot months. Doing this will reduce over heat and dehydration deaths prior to checking the trap. Try to place the traps where you can get a full sized pick up with a trailer in tow to the location. This makes trap set up, daily monitoring, re-baiting, and removal of hogs much easier. IF you can, put the traps where you can check them from 100-200 yards away without having to actually go right up to the trap. By doing so you will be able to take distance scoped rifle shots at larger trapped hogs prior to them damaging the traps. Also many times there will be hogs outside of the trap hanging out with the trapped ones. These can be dispatched from a distance if you are able to see that they are there. Make sure to check local law on trap construction and operation.

Scent control at traps is also important. If you have uneducated pigs it really does not matter as much. If you have trap educated hogs, you will need to keep human scent to minimum or cover it up with strong attractant scents. The best time to run a newly set up trap is right after a rain.

Snares are a common method and work well, I am told. I have about 2 dozen snares but have been afraid of snaring a deer in them so they have not been used extensively. Snares of course can also catch and kill dogs if not careful. All snares should have a deer stop placed on them to help lessen the chance of trapping a deer. One option that I have heard of involves placing snares on the posts of a trap to catch the hogs that will circle the trap after a few get caught. No deer will be doing that so the chance of catching a deer there is minimal. I use large coral traps mostly and I have witnessed a hog bending a T post in half and pulling it out of the ground when it got tangled in the tie off cable of my "hog pipe feeder". Due to this I have been worried that putting snares on the outside of my coral traps may lead to their early destruction. I have heard of large boars breaking off of snares when approached by humans so always check your snares cautiously and armed.

Basic snare set up


Maybe someone can contribute more info on snares.



This post was edited on 10/10 at 5:36 pm


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Bleeding purple
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Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Box Traps

The standard box trap consists of a metal box built out of angle iron and utility wire panel that will have a shape similar to a shoe box. There will be a door entry of some sort on the cage. The most popular is either a vertically hinged door on a spring designed to close when triggered but capable of additional hogs pushing into the trap or a guillotine style vertical door that drops down when triggered.

Standard box traps do have some utility. They are can be bought premade. They are more portable. They are easier and quicker to set up and take down. Depending on the design they can be lifted onto or converted into a road ready trailer for the transport of live hogs. They have more structural support than most corral traps and thus they are less likely to be damaged by hogs. Due to having a roof they are less likely to have deer go into them.

Some of the disadvantages are that they have a roof that does not let deer escape by jumping out if they are captured. They are usually heavy and moving the traps is usually a 2-3 man job. They are not large enough to catch a big group of hogs at once. They are expensive running from 250-500 depending on what you want. They have metal grate floors which the hogs are able to feel and thus don't go into the traps as well as corral traps. They have a more obvious appearance and do not blend into the woods like a coral trap. This means trap educated hogs will avoid them.

This is my only box trap. It is 4x4x8 and weighs about 350 lbs. You can see the 1.5" angle iron used as supports and the hog panel 10 gauge wire sides. The tall bar holds the door up and there is a cable running down from there to a root style trigger. There is marker tape on the cable so I can see from a distance if the door has been shut by accidental firing of the trigger.





Drawing of the box trap


Pictures of the damage this 305 lb hog did to the trap prior to overheating and dying



Corral Traps

By far these are the most effective traps. When set up and run well you can catch dozens of hogs at a time. Catching an entire sounder of hogs at once of course reduces the numbers of trap educated hogs running around for the future. There are some advantages of corral traps versus box style traps. They can be set up pretty much anywhere. They can be as simple or as elaborate as you want them to be. You can build a corral trap for under a 100 dollars or step up to a more elaborate version for only a little more. The trap is easily transportable and can be placed by one person. You can get the trap deeper into deep woods and cover than a box trap. The traps are open top allowing deer that may accidentally enter to jump out. This also meets bear requirements in states that have them.

There are also some disadvantages. The traps have no roof so hogs can climb and get over the top although that is rare. Unless they have welded frames they are weaker than a box. And finally, the traps take longer to set up and take down and require driving T posts.

Cow damage to a panel when they trapped themselves and then "jumped" out smashing the top of the trap.


Differing Styles of Corral Traps

I have used several versions of the corral trap. I have used multiple materials to build the traps and have seen many fail. I have used traps that utilize tensioned cattle panel as a one way entry without actual doors or gates, guillotine style drop non-reentry gates, root style gates; gravity operated hinged drop gates, and assisted closure hinged side swing gates. I have used corrals built from utility panels completely welded to frames of steel tubing complete with elaborate door mechanisms. I have used traps triggered by root style stick triggers, pendulum activated hanging feed buckets, pull pin trip wires, break away trip wires, and balance sticks.

Door Construction

I have built and used three different trap door designs on our corral traps.

The cheapest and easiest to build is a simple guillotine door made of 2x4’s and 3/4" plywood. The only other things needed were some screws and a screw in eye bolt. It is included in the "Video review of corral trap with wooden guillotine door build" below.


The walk through door re entry design is the one I like the most. It allows for the door to be propped open and then triggered by a trip wire. After it closes the pigs can still push in but not push out. I made this one out of some discount shelving I found really cheap at Lowes. The construction of this door requires welding. Really though, it is a pretty simple design consisting of two short walls with hinged door in the center. The outside of the door is blocked with angle iron at the top and the bottom to prevent it from being pushed outward. The door is spring closed. The springs I use are from trampolines. I drive a stake in the ground to prevent the door from opening beyond 90 degrees. This is so the trip wire had a ridged endpoint to pull against.

The last design is a simple root door that works on the same re-entry premise. It allows for the door to be propped open and then triggered by a trip wire. After it closes the pigs can still push in but not push out. I found this door the least reliable often being tripped by coons, and the most difficult for me to move through. Although the hogs are able to push in once the door closes, I have had no luck with them doing so.



Video of a welded frame corral trap

After seeing the catch success, experiencing the ease of use, and comparing the failure rates of each style I have developed my own preferences. I personally like to have a trap with about a 20ft diameter that is equipped with a re-entry style door that is tall enough for me to walk through, and is triggered by a break-away trip wire style trigger.



This post was edited on 11/12 at 7:51 pm


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Bleeding purple
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Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Material Selection

Due to cost I spent some time researching different wire materials for the sides of my corral traps. I tried field fence both twisted and knotted and galvanized welded wire. I found everything too weak to contain hogs with the exception of cattle panel, hog panel, feedlot graduated panel, and utility panel. These panels are all made of 4 gauge welded galvanized wire and come in 16' lengths. They vary in height though depending on which one you pick and where you get them. The ones I use most are cattle panels and are 50" tall. The wires create openings that are 8" wide with two rows of openings 4" high and the rest of the openings are 6" high. Hog panel is generally shorter 34" and used to keep hogs out of areas but will not keep them in an enclosure. Utility panel is the absolute best for the job as the openings are only 4"x 4” but it is 3 times the cost and quite a bit heavier.

I have tried various forms of support posts also. Trees do work fair in the place of posts as long as they are fairly vertical and the roots don't cause the ground to be too un-level. Initially I tried using 3/4" electrical staples to affix the panels to the trees but with repeated ramming the hogs can knock them loose. If you use trees I recommend using 10 gauge galvanized wire tied through the panel and around the tree. I have tried differing length U-posts and T posts. U posts are simply too weak and are pushed over. T posts are strong enough but depending on the soil type they need to be anchored at least 1 ft in the ground. For the 50" panel that I use I like to use 60" T posts driven at least 12" deep. For supporting the door and the panel joints, I like 6 ft of 6.5 ft T posts.

Tying wire can be pretty much any wire you want but non galvanized steel wire will be too rusted and weak after a year or more to perform well. I use 10 gauge galvanized wire.

For various forms of triggers some type of cable or connecting string is needed as a load bearing connection. You also need some form of eyelets for the cable string to run through. I have tried single and multi strand cable and found it to have too much memory. I have tried mason's braided nylon string and cotton string and found them to be too weak with too much stretch. I finally settled on using high test braided fishing line as my load bearing connection. Any brand is probably ok but I am using 50 lb spiderwire because that is what I had lying around. For eyelets to route the spiderwire through, I recommend 1" welded rings. I have tried small pulleys but all of the forms of wire/string will jump off the wheel of the pulley and wedge inside. The rings work just as well, last longer, and have no moving parts to foul up.

For break away style trip wires you will need a connecting wire that will break under pressure but is strong enough to support the load of the door. For this I have tried regular monofilament fishing line in various tests, small multi-stranded wire, and single strand picture hanging wire in various load ranges. I found that the mono stretched over time and failed too easily. I found the stranded wire to be inconsistent in breaking point. I use single strand galvanized picture hanging wire in 3-10 lb load range. The load range you need depends on the load of the door and closing mechanism.

The door or gate of the corral may be made from any durable material. Wooden parts should be pressure treated. Welded metal doors are more durable. 1/8" thick 1.5" x 1.5" angle iron or 3/4" square steel tubing can be welded to make all of the door configuration frames I have used. 4 gauge cattle panel listed above is welded on the frames to cover the open areas in the frame.

My Corral Trap Construction

I use the following:
A Door Panel (I prefer the spring assisted side hinged doors but sometimes use a guillotine style wood drop door)
3 16' x 50" cattle panels
4 6' T posts
9 5' T posts
A spool of 10 gauge galvanized wire (Tie Wire)
2 welded rings
A spool of 50 lb spiderwire (Load Wire)
A spool of 10 lb galvanized picture wire (Break Wire)

I lay out the cattle panels with the small gaps facing the same side and overlap the ends by one gap, 8", and then use the Tie Wire and tie them together at multiple sites of overlap. This gives me a 50" by 46.5' wall. I roll this up as tightly as possible (~5' dia). You can fit this roll in the back of a pick up easily. If you make your door panel only 4 ft wide it will fit between the tire wells also. With the addition of the T posts and T post driver you are set.

Now go pick your spot. Find where you want the door first. Put it where you can see if it is open or shut from a long distance. Face the door toward the closest game trail. Stake your door panel in place with two 6' T posts making sure to keep the knobs on the T post facing out. Unroll your cattle panel walls with the small gaps near the ground. Wire the wall panels to the door panel on each side of the door, making sure to slightly overlap the panel on the inside of the door. You will need wire ties at the lowest two levels, mid way up and one at the top. Now work your way from the door in either direction placing a T post on the outside of the wall panel every 48" (6 panel blocks) and wire it in place. Make sure to use a 6' T post at the panel lap joints and 5' posts in between. Try to keep the T posts in line with the vertical wire of the panel. Continue to tie with 4 ties as described before. These need to be twisted tight with pliers and should go under the closest outward facing knob on the T post. Doing this keeps the hogs from rooting the panel up the T post. Make the trap round or oval in shape. Avoid any sharp angles including by the door. Pigs will stack up in corners and climb out. If you want to catch all fo the piglets too, you can put a layer of 24" high 1.5" chicken wire around the inside of the trap now. Now use tie wire to attach the welded rings on the inside wall of the trap. Place the first high on the trap and inline with the door. Place the second ring lower on the trap (12" off ground) about 4 ft away. Make sure when the door is full opened there is a hard stop that stops it from opening too far which would allow too much play in the trip wire. Now the trap is built and needs to be set.
Video review of corral trap with wooden guillotine door build

To set the trap, open the door fully and secure it at that location with a stay. Identify the location of the end of the tripwire. Place your braid spool there and thread it back through the welded rings to the door. Tie the braid to the door. Now cut the braid and tie a loop in the trip wire end. Wrap about 4" of the picture hanging wire onto a low spot on the wall panel. Secure a small length of the wire to the braid. Now remove the door stay and assure the trip wire will hold the load. Now trip it to assure that will work and reset the same way.

I bait heavy under and behind the trip wire and spread the corn out all over the coral otherwise. DO NOT BAIT DIRECTLY BEHIND THE DOOR OF THE TRAP. a pig will come in and root the door closed before others get in large numbers.

Review of basic trip wire trigger and baiting the trap



This post was edited on 11/12 at 7:46 pm


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The Last Coco
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


quote:

Bleeding purple






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bapple
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Pure Genius, BP!









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BourgsTheWord
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


bookmarked





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Mung
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Well done, BP. They completely outcompete bears, deer, turkeys and other game species for just about every source of food, which means that they limit the numbers that we can harvest and hunt. I shoot everyone that i see, but make very little dent in the population.





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mister_sportzz
Member since Aug 2013
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


I asked this on another thread but you seem to be the resident hog expert: How mean/aggressive are these animals when you trap them? Are they a danger to you when they are out in the wild?

I went dove hunting in Texas. That night, we drove around and I saw some of the hogs.






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s14suspense
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


quote:

Larger hogs develop a thickened area over the shoulders often called a shield from fighting and rubbing on trees.



Shoot em in the gut and let em run off.






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Flair Chops
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re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


added to the stickied thread





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Mung
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4115 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


quote:

expert


not me. BP is most definitely the hog expert on the OB. i just shoot them while deer and squirrel hunting, and while scouting during hunting seasons. They are delicious, but very hard to hunt. By that i mean they get very wary and go nocturnal with the least amount of pressure. I've killed way more pigs than deer in the last few years, just because of the higher numbers and availability.



This post was edited on 10/7 at 2:32 pm


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jimbeam
USA Fan
University of LSU
Member since Oct 2011
26922 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


quote:

Just buy a shotgun. Just buy a double barreled shotgun






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4X4DEMON
Northwestern St. Fan
NWLA
Member since Dec 2007
11068 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Good read, you get all that off of wikipedia?





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redwingtiger
LSU Fan
Houston, TEXAS
Member since Feb 2011
1600 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Great post BP







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Bleeding purple
TCU Fan
Athens, Texas
Member since Sep 2007
20947 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


typing it from experience in between patients on a slow day,.



Keep looking there is more on the next few pages



This post was edited on 10/14 at 2:35 pm


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4X4DEMON
Northwestern St. Fan
NWLA
Member since Dec 2007
11068 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Yea I was just messin with ya. I didn't know quite a few things I learned from that.






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Slickback
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Deer Stand
Member since Mar 2008
25629 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Excellent post. I'm just glad they haven't invaded my two hunting spots...yet.





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Hammertime
LSU Fan
apples
Member since Jan 2012
13486 posts

re: Instrucional hog trapping and eradication thread (Hog-B-Gone)


Still haven't figured out how to not double(or quadruple) post?

I was gonna suggest adding to the sticky thread, but Chops got it






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