How common are Non exempt salary jobs | TigerDroppings.com

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D Tide
Member since Mar 2012
189 posts

How common are Non exempt salary jobs


How normal are non exempt salary jobs.(salary but eligible for OT) I just started working one and had never heard of anyone actually getting a job like this. I've been pretty excited about it.






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CajunAlum Tiger Fan
LSU Fan
Broussard
Member since Jan 2008
2401 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


Just curious, why are you excited about this classification?









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jmtigers
Southern Miss Fan
1826.71 miles from USC
Member since Sep 2003
3597 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


He can be paid overtime. My job offers this as long as the hours are for sure billable to a client/project.





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CajunAlum Tiger Fan
LSU Fan
Broussard
Member since Jan 2008
2401 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


I ask because I had to re-classify an employee as non-exempt and it can be viewed as a demotion. Salary non-exempt is really an hourly position since you must track hours, right?







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meeple
New Orleans Saints Fan
The Ozone Belt
Member since May 2011
1100 posts
 Online 

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


I'm exempt and all of our admins are NES. We both have to track hours.





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D Tide
Member since Mar 2012
189 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


quote:

Just curious, why are you excited about this classification?

I have to "track" hours but I get paid for 40 hours every week no matter if its 25 or 40 but if I go over I get overtime pay. So i get all the benefits of being salary: Leaving early on slow days long lunches etc and if i ever have a busy week or get called in I get paid for it






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Ace Midnight
LSU Fan
Ball, LA - Home, Sweet Home
Member since Dec 2006
28484 posts
 Online 

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


Federal GS jobs are like that, at least for some agencies. Hours are tracked for time and attendance purposes, as well as leave, credit, comp, etc., so you could argue they're "hourly". They publish an hourly rate, primarily for OT or leave without pay purposes.

But certainly not "hourly" as the general public uses that term.



This post was edited on 8/30 at 7:06 am


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TheDiesel
LSU Fan
Houston via Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2010
2407 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


I'm an engineer that works for a contractor and we we non-exempt. I like it since I get paid if I have to stay and work over, as long as it is approved by the client.





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Nobs
LSU Fan
Pearland, Tx
Member since Dec 2010
268 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


I work for an oil major and we have some jobs like this. We consider them paraprofessional.

It's the middle ground between hourly people and technical professionals.

Our people only need to track and charge the OT hours. Their base rate is covered.






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kennypowers816
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Jan 2010
1665 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


quote:

I have to "track" hours but I get paid for 40 hours every week no matter if its 25 or 40 but if I go over I get overtime pay. So i get all the benefits of being salary: Leaving early on slow days long lunches etc and if i ever have a busy week or get called in I get paid for it


You might want to check on this. Seems like if I was your employer, I wouldn't be too thrilled about 25hr workweeks, regular long lunches and leaving early on "slow days"... especially if I'm going to be paying you 1.5x when you have to stay on "busy days"






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Catman88
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Dec 2004
39345 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


quote:

.(salary but eligible for OT)


Unless you plan on being a 9-5 (out the door at 5), 5 days a week person I dont understand how you could not see how anyone would be happy about being eligible for OT.







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EA6B
Navy Fan
TX
Member since Dec 2012
1186 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


quote:

You might want to check on this. Seems like if I was your employer, I wouldn't be too thrilled about 25hr workweeks, regular long lunches and leaving early on "slow days"... especially if I'm going to be paying you 1.5x when you have to stay on "busy days"


This is extremely common in the technical service world. The jobs may require a formal degree, but because you are doing repair work on customer sites for a significant percentage of your time federal labor laws requires the positions to be non-exempt. Most of these jobs have the employee working remote from any type of office setting, and the work load varies from boredom to brutal. It is not anything like a 9-5 job, and managers understand that when the schedule is light employees catch up on personal stuff because the next day my bring a 100 hour stretch with only enough time off to get a little sleep. G.E., Siemens, Philips Medical, Halliburton, tons of other major corps. have these type position, usually as field engineers.






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D Tide
Member since Mar 2012
189 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


quote:

You might want to check on this. Seems like if I was your employer, I wouldn't be too thrilled about 25hr workweeks, regular long lunches and leaving early on "slow days"... especially if I'm going to be paying you 1.5x when you have to stay on "busy days"


I just said 25hr for an example. I just thought most non exempt jobs were govt. The pay isn't great but I put in my 40 and head home compared to some I know putting in 50-60+






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Croacka
UNLV Fan
Denham Springs
Member since Dec 2008
48702 posts
 Online 

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


Every engineering company that I know of hires most people as non exempt salary


Upper management may not be but they typically are eligible for bigger bonuses






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Jibbajabba
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since May 2011
1379 posts

re: How common are Non exempt salary jobs


I may be mistaken but i was under the impression that the only way you could be exempt salaried was if you directly supervised/evaluated subbordinate employees.





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