Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles | Page 2 | TigerDroppings.com

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Roaad
LSU Fan
Bushrod Owns
Member since Aug 2006
52736 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


The Euros are happy.

They were irritated that an American was beating them at their race.

The French, particularly.

I'd be willing to bet that all the 2nd-10th place guys aren't having their tests redone 10+ years after the fact.

This was always a witch hunt, and I am not convinced he is guilty. But if he did dope, they should also drag up the rest of the guys that he beat.

If they doped, too. . .then he still won fairly.






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USMC Gators
Member since Oct 2011
14633 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Will Alabama claim them now?
ZING






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Interception
Providence Fan
Member since Nov 2008
11089 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


When was the last time Armstrong won? They been holding his piss for a decade, ewww?





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USMC Gators
Member since Oct 2011
14633 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


His last was in 2005 (I think).





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TigerBait1127
New Orleans Saints Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Jun 2005
33333 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


quote:

There are ways to beat the piss test. Just b/c he never tested tested positive does not mean he didn't use them.


you think he was just doing piss tests?

He was probably the most tested and scrutinized athlete ever



This post was edited on 8/23 at 10:52 pm


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Dr. 3
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2005
10987 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Anyone familiar with the evidence that is the basis of the allegations? I dont feel like searching.





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Interception
Providence Fan
Member since Nov 2008
11089 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


I'm sure he was blood doping, but I have yet to hear the evidence against him except a few guys with axes to grind saying they eyewitnessed him shoot up?

Someone enlighten me here?






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catfish 62
LSU Fan
Atlanta
Member since Mar 2010
2864 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Can he plead the Ryan Braun? Keep his piss for 8+ years...







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Dr. 3
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2005
10987 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Stripping title back to 99? They got evidence he doped 13 years ago? Someone had to roll on him or something.





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Zamoro10
Member since Jul 2008
14741 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Title is wrong...isn't official until court determines authority or lack thereof.





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LaBornNRaised
LSU Fan
The Datty's are Fixed!
Member since Feb 2011
10061 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


quote:

Will Alabama claim them now?








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jjbodean1970
LSU Fan
Morgantown, WV
Member since Mar 2006
6489 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


armstrong passed every single drug test, ever. the usada better have some damn strong proof of doping to have dragged this thing out for so long. i'd like to know what exactly it is, if they do, indeed, have it. knowing he passed every time i'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt for the time being.





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Teddy Ruxpin
LSU Fan
New Orleans, LA
Member since Oct 2006
19964 posts
 Online 

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


So, officially, has ANYONE won the Tour de France in the last 20 years? I think this title has been stripped from every winner for about two decades.





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TexasTiger08
Akron Fan
Corpus Christi, TX
Member since Oct 2006
11965 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


Copare him to Bonds? Barry was associated with some known criminals who were proven guilty in court who supplied several other users who DID admit.

And saving samples for future testing? Let me get this straight...he has passed everyone thus far, we will save samples for future tests...and just assume he will fail them?

He did blood tests, not just piss tests. Wake up people.

The other cyclists who constantly rat on him are receiving some sort of immunity in the courts for providing other info...after they did fail tests.






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quail man
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
New York, NY
Member since May 2010
27511 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


quote:

Going forward, I am going to devote myself to raising my five beautiful (and energetic) kids, fighting cancer, and attempting to be the fittest 40-year old on the planet.


Glad that's his third life goal going forward.






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SPEEDY
Lamar Fan
2005 Tiger Smack Poster of the Year
Member since Dec 2003
59658 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


quote:

How can a US agency strip a French title?






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SammyTiger
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Feb 2009
11635 posts
 Online 

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


1. All cyclists who get caught do is talk about how easy it is to beat the test, but they didn't so it must not be that easy

2. It is ridiculous. THe USADA just has an axe to grind and they are going to grind it all the way. THis case was thrown out by real investigators, but they don't have to follow real laws so they can just throw out their bans and call it a day.






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bigt41
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2008
3484 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


this is like a stab in heart





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Wooly
Washington Fan
Member since Feb 2012
12378 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


quote:

Glad that's his third life goal going forward.



well he did accomplish a lot... and he is single now






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Interception
Providence Fan
Member since Nov 2008
11089 posts

re: Armstrong Officially Stripped of Tour Titles


LINK


Armstrong Drops Fight Against Doping Charges

After more than a decade of outrunning accusations that he had doped during his celebrated cycling career, Lance Armstrong, one of the best known and most accomplished athletes in recent history, surrendered on Thursday, ending his fight against charges that he used performance-enhancing drugs.

Armstrong, who won the Tour de France an unprecedented seven straight times, said that he would not continue to contest the charges levied against him by the United States Anti-Doping Agency, which claimed that he doped and was one of the ringleaders of systematic doping on his Tour-winning teams.

He continued to deny ever doping, calling the antidoping agency’s case against him “an unconstitutional witch hunt” and saying the process it followed to deal with his matter was “one-sided and unfair.”

“There comes a point in every man’s life when he has to say, ‘Enough is enough,’ ” Armstrong said in a statement. “For me, that time is now.”

Armstrong, who turns 41 next month, said he would not contest the charges because it had taken too much of a toll on his family and his work for his cancer foundation, saying he was “finished with this nonsense.”

Armstrong’s decision, according to the World Anti-Doping Code, means he will be stripped of his seven Tour titles, the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Olympics and all other titles, awards and money he won from August 1998 forward.

It also means he will be barred for life from competing, coaching or having any official role with any Olympic sport or other sport that follows the World Anti-Doping Code. “It’s a sad day for all of us who love sport and our athletic heroes,” Travis Tygart, chief executive of the United States Anti-Doping Agency, said. “It’s yet another heartbreaking example of how the win-at-all-costs culture, if left unchecked, will overtake fair, safe and honest competition.”


As in many other high-profile doping cases — including that of the Olympic sprinter Marion Jones and other athletes involved in the sprawling Bay Area Laboratory Co-operative case, known as Balco — Tygart and the antidoping agency were basing their case not on a positive drug test but rather on other supporting evidence. Armstrong seized on that in his statement.

He said again and again that he had never tested positive — though he did test positive at the 1999 Tour for a corticosteroid, for which he produced a backdated doctor’s prescription.

Armstrong also said the case against him was flimsy without that physical evidence.

“Regardless of what Travis Tygart says, there is zero physical evidence to support his outlandish and heinous claims,” Armstrong said. “The only physical evidence here is the hundreds of controls I have passed with flying colors.”

But even without a positive test, the antidoping agency appeared set to move forward with arbitration. It claimed to have more than 10 eyewitnesses who would testify that Armstrong used banned blood transfusions, the blood booster EPO, testosterone and other drugs to win the Tour. Some of Armstrong’s closest teammates, including George Hincapie — one of the most respected American riders — were also expected to testify against him.

The antidoping agency also said it had blood test results of Armstrong’s from 2009 and 2010 that were consistent with doping.

This is not the first time a top cyclist has suffered such a career implosion — it has been common in cycling in recent years, as doping has crippled the sport. Several recent Tour de France champions have been found guilty of doping, including the American rider Floyd Landis and Alberto Contador of Spain. But none of them had the stature of Armstrong.

Although it is possible that the International Cycling Union, the world’s governing body for cycling, will appeal his suspension to the Court of Arbitration for Sport because it had battled over jurisdiction over this case, Armstrong’s choice to accept his sanction tarnishes the athletic achievements of an athlete who inspired millions with his story of cancer survival.

Armstrong was already a world-champion cyclist when he was found to have testicular cancer in 1996, at 25. He overcame the odds to beat the disease. He then showed amazing strength and resilience by returning to cycling to win the Tour in 1999, gaining a mass of followers with almost a gravitational pull. They idolized him for showing that cancer could not stop him.

His legion of fans grew each year after that, and each year he won the Tour for them, turning himself into a star that transcended sports.

But in the shadows of his wild success were accusations that he had doped to win. In 1999, he tested positive for a banned corticosteroid on his way to winning his first Tour.

[b]In 2004, the book “L.A. Confidential,” published only in French, linked Armstrong to doping, including claims by his team’s former massage therapist that he had asked her for makeup to hide needle tracks on his arm because they were evidence of his doping. In 2005, a former personal assistant claimed he found a steroid in Armstrong’s medicine cabinet.

Also in the mid-2000s, a French newspaper reported that six of Armstrong’s urine samples from the 1999 Tour had tested positive retroactively for the banned blood booster EPO. The strict standards for laboratory testing were not followed on those samples, so nothing ever came of those results.

Through the years, the accusations became more and more entangled. A Texas-based insurance company tried to withhold a $5 million performance bonus from Armstrong for his victory at the 2004 Tour because it said Armstrong had doped. Armstrong won a settlement.

In testimony in that case, Armstrong’s former teammate, Frankie Andreu, and Andreu’s wife, Betsy, said they had overheard Armstrong admitting to doctors when he was undergoing cancer treatment that he had used steroids, human growth hormone and EPO while cycling.

The accusations followed Armstrong wherever he went, but gained pace in recent years, though Armstrong’s last Tour victory continued to fade into the horizon.

Landis, who was stripped of the 2006 Tour title for doping, in 2010 accused Armstrong of doping and being involved in a doping scheme while the two were teammates. Last year, Tyler Hamilton — another Armstrong top lieutenant — told CBS that Armstrong and others on Armstrong’s teams were involved in a complex doping scheme that involved code words and secret cellphones.[/b
]

Through it all, Armstrong denied doping. Even a two-year federal investigation into Armstrong that examined possible doping-related crimes seemed to come up empty. It folded earlier this year with no charges brought.

Armstrong, who retired from cycling last year, was not as fortunate this time.

He could have chosen to go to arbitration, which would have meant that witnesses could testify against him in a hearing possibly open to the public. Instead, he chose to bow out of the process.

In doing so, he emphasized that his Tour victories would always be his.

“I know who won those seven Tours, my teammates know who won those seven Tours, and everyone I competed against knows who won those seven Tours,” Armstrong said, adding: “The toughest event in the world, where the strongest man wins. Nobody can ever change that.”





This post was edited on 8/24 at 12:20 am


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