Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew | TigerDroppings.com

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Kafka
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Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Ry Cooder

Roots-rocker and maestro of the slide guitar. If you are unfamiliar with him, but like Levon Helm and The Band, you should definitely check him out:



The Dark End Of The Street (live on BBC-TV, 1977)

It's All Over now (with David Lindley)

He'll Have To Go
a Tex-Mex reworking of the Jim Reeves country standard -- with Flaco Jimenez on accordion

Stand By Me
with Flaco, more Tex-Mex

Little Sister

The Rising Sons - Take A Giant Step (1966)
Ry on guitar, Taj Mahal on vocal. Written by Carole King and Gerry Goffin.

Married Man's A Fool

Jesus On The Mainline




This post was edited on 2/8 at 7:18 am



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VABuckeye
Ohio State Fan
Oak Hill, VA
Member since Dec 2007
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Yep. Big fan. My personal favorite album, (yes vinyl) of his.





This post was edited on 4/23 at 4:24 pm


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Chitter Chatter
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Ry Cooder influenced the Stones sound from '69 on. He 'taught' Keith the open G tuning and was concreted into the Stones sound. Gram Parsons was an influence on Keith as well but IMO, Ry was the bigger of the two.





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Kafka
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


quote:

Ry Cooder influenced the Stones sound from '69 on

He claims to have come up with the "Honky Tonk Women" guitar riff, and was robbed of composer credit.






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Tigris
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In a van by the river.
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Bop Till You Drop was the first CD I bought and I still pull it out from time to time. "I Think It's Gonna Work Out Fine" is greatness.



Great slide guitar player. He filled in for Lowell George for a while when he hurt his hand. Ry Cooder also does a nice job on Dirty Life and Times on Warren Zevon's last album (The Wind).






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TFTC
LSU Fan
New Orleans, LA
Member since May 2010
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


The master of all things fretted...





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OldTigahFot
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


quote:

Ry Cooder influenced the Stones sound from '69 on. He 'taught' Keith the open G tuning and was concreted into the Stones sound. Gram Parsons was an influence on Keith as well but IMO, Ry was the bigger of the two.


He was featured prominently on the "Let It Bleed" album. Terrific guitarist !







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Ross
Auburn Fan
Auburn
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Ralph Macchio made him





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rutiger
Rutgers Fan
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


I love the rising sons with taj mahal. Both those dudes are legends.





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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Just discovered this album tonight:

Fusion -- Border Town (1969, full album)





Ry Cooder plays on seven tracks

The vocals are nothing to sing about (IMHO they range from inept to hilariously ludicrous) but Ry/slide fans should check it out.






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Kafka
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


quote:

Bobby Charles (February 21, 1938 – January 14, 2010) was an American singer-songwriter.

An ethnic Cajun, Charles was born as Robert Charles Guidry in Abbeville, Louisiana and grew up listening to Cajun music and the country and western music of Hank Williams. At the age of 15, he heard a performance by Fats Domino, an event that "changed my life forever," he recalled.

Charles helped to pioneer the south Louisiana musical genre known as swamp pop. His compositions include the hits "See You Later, Alligator", which he initially recorded himself as "Later Alligator", but which is best known from the cover version by Bill Haley & His Comets; and "Walking to New Orleans", written for Fats Domino.

"(I Don't Know Why) But I Do" was an early 1960s song that Charles composed, which Clarence "Frogman" Henry had a major hit with, and which was on the soundtrack to the 1994 film, Forrest Gump.

quote:

On November 26, 1976, Charles was invited to play with The Band at their farewell concert, The Last Waltz. Charles played "Down South in New Orleans", with the help of Dr. John and The Band. The performance was recorded and released as part of the triple-LP The Last Waltz box set. The performance was not captured on film however, and did not appear in the film based on the concert with Charles only appearing briefly in the concert's final song, "I Shall Be Released" (he is largely blocked from view during the song). That song, sung by Bob Dylan and pianist Richard Manuel, featured backup vocals from the entire ensemble, including Charles.


Rick Danko, Bobby Charles, Robbie Robertson, and Dr. John at The Last Waltz concert:



Bobby Charles - "The Jealous Kind"
Bobby Charles Vocal
Dr. John Piano, Guitar
Paul Butterfield Harmonica
Rick Danko Bass
Levon Helm Drums
Garth Hudson Organ
Richard Manuel Drums, Piano?
Fred Carter, Jr. Guitar
(Some may know this song from the cover version by Delbert McClinton)

Bobby Charles - "I Must Be in a Good Place Now"




Levon Helm with mandolin and Bobby Charles on stage in Tokyo









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rutiger
Rutgers Fan
purgatory
Member since Jun 2007
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


this thread needs some gram parsons.







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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remembering The Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
70766 posts

re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


quote:

this thread needs some gram parsons


He'd probably be more comfortably placed HERE

Though of course there is bound to be some overlap between the two threads






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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
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Member since Jul 2007
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


AshGroveMusic.com

quote:

For 15 years, beginning in 1958, the Ash Grove presented music as a major voice for the experiences, beliefs and feelings of communities and peoples. It was an important focus in the lives of over 100,000 Los Angelenos. The performance standards and creative interplay among musicians, young and old, produced many great artists, enriched the lives of audiences, and gave the club a leading role in the culture of a generation.

Muddy Waters, Linda Ronstadt, Lenny Bruce, Joan Baez, Phil Ochs, Taj Mahal, Jerry Garcia, Jackson Browne, Bonnie Raitt and dozens of other stars all played at the Ash Grove. Flatt & Scruggs, Bill Monroe and Doc Watson performed their first West Coast concerts here. Bluesmen Lightnin' Hopkins, Mississippi John Hurt and Mance Lipscomb also frequented the legendary club.




Supposedly The Ash Grove recorded thousands of hours of concerts. Wolfgang's Vault has many available for DL -- register for a free 7 day trial and you get access to free streaming.

The Rising Sons (w/ Ry Cooder & Taj Mahal) - May 28, 1965 - Late Show

Wolfgang's Vault has a show from 1963 where Jackie DeShannon is backed by 16 year old Ry Cooder

The White Brothers (w/Clarence White) - April 1, 1967







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TheDoc
LSU Fan
doc is no more
Member since Dec 2005
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re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


The lead guitarist in my band is obsessed with Ry. He's pretty damn good.





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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remembering The Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
70766 posts

re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


quote:

The lead guitarist in my band is obsessed with Ry. He's pretty damn good.



Tell him to check out Clarence

The Gosdin Brothers - "Tell Me"

Clarence & Ry - "Why You Been Gone So Long?"

The Byrds - "This Wheel's on Fire"

ETA: "This Wheel's On Fire" - live TV clip (1968)



This post was edited on 3/23 at 7:58 pm


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rutiger
Rutgers Fan
purgatory
Member since Jun 2007
15794 posts

re: Roots Rock -- country, folk and blues mixed all together into one big stew


Awesome bump.





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