What's been the last "big" change in Catholicism? - Page 3 - TigerDroppings.com

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ClydeFrog
Oklahoma Fan
Kansas
Member since Jul 2012
3006 posts

re: What's been the last "big" change in Catholicism?


quote:

Not since the First Council of Nicaea in 325 AD. 


And what happened before that?






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Interception
Providence Fan
Member since Nov 2008
11089 posts

re: What's been the last "big" change in Catholicism?


The Bishop of Rome has been around for quite a while.

ETA: They certainly were an organization for some time. I mean we are talking about semantics. Are you saying that Peter was not the founder of the Catholic Church?



This post was edited on 3/13 at 11:45 pm


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MStant1
LSU Fan
New York, NY and Houston, TX
Member since Sep 2010
4190 posts

re: What's been the last "big" change in Catholicism?


Yes, I'm saying Peter was not the founder. If you could go back in time and ask him about the Catholic Church he would have no clue what you were talking about. Heck even the first recorded usage of the word Catholic in 107 AD was a Greek or Latin word to simply describe early Christians being united in their faith; not a term to describe an organized religion.

Also wasn't Peter married?






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GumboPot
LSU Fan
Saints Fan
Member since Mar 2009
24274 posts

re: What's been the last "big" change in Catholicism?


quote:

Yes, I'm saying Peter was not the founder. If you could go back in time and ask him about the Catholic Church he would have no clue what you were talking about. Heck even the first recorded usage of the word Catholic in 107 AD was a Greek or Latin word to simply describe early Christians being united in their faith; not a term to describe an organized religion.


Admittedly there is no reference in Christianity to the word "catholic" (meaning "universal") until the 2nd century. However if you read the Didache you see that there are no inconsistencies from the teachings in the Didache to the teachings of the modern catechism. Many historical scholars consider the Didache to be written directly by the apostles and the first catechism.

A critical element in the church is apostolic succession. That is from Jesus-->Peter--->popes--->bishops--->priest though time. It really doesn't matter what this group in apostolic succession calls themselves as long as it is apostolic. Semantics are important but have no bearing on proving or disproving the existence of something. For example, all Christians believe in the trinity, however the word trinity cannot be found in the bible nor was word in existence in the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd centuries.

I also think Peter would totally disagree with you considering he started the Roman church which was one of the Pentarchy right after Jesus died on the cross. In fact, Peter was crucified upside down by the Romans because of his evangelizing in Rome.






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