Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks | TigerDroppings.com

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Cmlsu5618
McNeese State Fan
Destin, FL
Member since Sep 2010
2195 posts

Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


Changed the question up a bit:

It would be apples to oranges if your mutual funds had different asset classes versus just stocks..

But do you have any, largely, stock mutual fund accounts that you track versus the overall market (1YR/3YR/5YR)?

For reference, and as of C.O.B. 6/9/14, Google Finance shows the S&P 500 is up:

1YR- +18.7%
3YR- +53.5%
5YR- +107.6%



This post was edited on 6/9 at 9:03 pm



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foshizzle
LSU Fan
Washington DC metro
Member since Mar 2008
29700 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


The argument for diversification is that for a given level of risk you get a better return (or the other way around, for a given return you suffer less volatility). So for a true comparison you need to see whether your return/volatility ratio is better, not just return.

My returns (almost entirely index funds) are about the same as the Wilshire 5000 but the fluctuations have been much lower. For example, during the big 2008 crash the S&P was down nearly 40%, I was only down 28%. When the S&P is doing really well I generally lag behind b/c of my exposure to other things. But overall the total return is about the same.






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Iowa Golfer
Iowa Fan
Heaven
Member since Dec 2013
1315 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


My worst year ever in my trading accounts was a 13.52 realized gain. Lifetime it is up a bunch due to some very large winners.

Commodities account is all over the board. But if I had to guess, I realize a consistent 4-5% annually. It serves as a hedge I guess is the best way to describe it.

My businesses retirement account lowest return for the lifetime is 8.57%, which is the high yield bond funds performance, the others are between the high 9's and 14%.

My ROTH is at about 18% for its lifetime. Most of it is in cash currently.

I do take realized gains in all of these accounts where warranted, and also on occasion move to mostly cash and bonds at some points. I never have these moves timed perfectly, but in 2007 I started to move away from equities, and have again recently.

Edit. My question is this, and yes I'm a simpleton. The charts scream the argument for buying an index, or a fund that owns the index securities to get benefit of the dividends. What am I missing here?






This post was edited on 6/9 at 9:03 pm


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Cmlsu5618
McNeese State Fan
Destin, FL
Member since Sep 2010
2195 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


How long has your Roth account been active?

quote:

What am I missing here?


Do you mean indexing vs. actively managed investments?






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Iowa Golfer
Iowa Fan
Heaven
Member since Dec 2013
1315 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


ROTH has been around since they first came out.

Yes, index funds -v- actively managed. By index fund I mean index, AND a fund that buys the index securities.






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Cmlsu5618
McNeese State Fan
Destin, FL
Member since Sep 2010
2195 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


on the long term return. That is impressive. Were you very active within the account?




I feel like if you were going for pure performance.. then statistically you're best bet is probably to index large caps and other highly reviewed stocks, and take a chance on good actively managed mutual funds for small caps and international equities where inefficiencies aren't as uncommon.

I have a stock portfolio but the S&P has caught up with me. My rolling 5 year consistently held above the index but international tariffs and a little bad timing brought be back down to Earth this year. Not to say I haven't made money, I just could have indexed instead and gotten to the same point so far.






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Iowa Golfer
Iowa Fan
Heaven
Member since Dec 2013
1315 posts

re: Stock investment accounts vs. benchmarks


Were you very active within the account? Yes. All my trades and picks.

I think when the time comes, I'm switching our SIMPLE IRA to be self managed as well. I have to wait until I have majority say so on this though.

My question is still, SPY, or SPX for example? I'm more inclined to buy a broader index, or index fund.







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