The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People | TigerDroppings.com

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RollTide1987
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The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People



10. Martin Luther King, Jr.

Instrumental in granting Civil Rights for millions of oppressed African-Americans. He has become a larger than life figure, best known for his speeches as well as his desire to bring about the end of Segregation using peaceful measures.



09. Pope John Paul II

Born Karol Wojtyla, Pope John Paul II spread a message of hope and love throughout the world. His secret battle with communism and the Soviet Union has become legendary, with many historians considering him to be just as instrumental as Margaret Thatcher and Ronald Reagan for the ultimate collapse of the Soviet empire.


08. Ronald Reagan

He inspired hope in the hearts of millions of Americans after Vietnam and the terrible decade of the 1970s. His emphasis on nationalism as well as his highly publicized economic battle with the Soviet Union made him a living legend in the eyes of his contemporaries. While there has been some criticism of his legacy by today's historians, there is no denying Reagan's impact on the 20th Century.


07. Mahatma Gandhi

One of the most famous pacifists who ever lived, Mahatma Gandhi was the most important political figure in the history of India. Be that as it may, however, I believe Ben Kingsley made a better Gandhi than even Gandhi did.


06. Albert Einstein

One of the greatest physicists that ever existed, Einstein has become a historical and cultural phenomenon in the eyes of America. His name is more popular than his history, with many Americans really having no idea what the hell he even contributed to society. He simply proved that an atomic bomb was possible, gave us the theory of relativity, as well as an iconic photograph that cultural icons such as Brittany Spears have attempted to imitate to this day.



05. Josef Stalin

What comedian Eddie Izzard would call a "mass-murdering frickhead," the cold, paranoid, and calculating Josef Stalin was most definitely one of - if not THE most - influential man of the last 50 years of the 20th Century. He created the Soviet empire and was the main contributor to the beginning of the Cold War. It also must be said that his Soviet Russia was the greatest contributor to the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II.


04. Theodore "Teddy" Roosevelt

No, this isn't a typo. Teddy, not Frankie, is my pick on this list. Why? Well...Teddy was instrumental in getting us involved in Spanish-American War at the end of the 19th Century, as well as essential in beefing up America's national strength, making it a power to be reckoned with on the world stage. In my opinion, there was no greater American in the 20th Century than this man right here.


03. Winston Churchill

Is he the greatest prime minister in the history of Great Britain? Quite possibly. But he definitely clocks in inside the top three on my countdown. His leadership of Great Britain in 1940 alone merits inclusion on this list. His iron will and refusal to give in to what seemed to be insurmountable odds kept the fire of democracy burning dimly in Europe in this dark days of 1940-41.


02. Adolf Hitler

There is very little that needs to be said, really. The man started a war that changed the course of history, a war that gave rise to the United States and the Soviet Union as the world's two greatest super power, and a war that gave us vasts amounts of new technologies. His name is just about as taboo as Lord Voldemort's but he wouldn't have ever been possible if not for the man at #1 on our countdown.



01. Gavrilo Princip

This is undoubtedly a name that many of you have never heard of, but the amount of influence he carries goes seemingly beyond the realm of possibility. He is the man who assassinated the Arch-Duke of Austria-Hungary, Franz Ferdinand, an action that ignited World War I. The bullets that he fired from his gun on June 28, 1914 were truly shots that were heard 'round the world. If not for his actions that day, the world might have never seen most of the names listed above. There would never have been a World War II, there wouldn't have been a Cold War, and the United States might have never become as powerful as it did. There would have been no Israel, no Arab terrorism, no 9/11. Literally every single significant world event of the last 95 years was a direct result of the actions that Gavrilo Princip took on that hot, summer day in the city of Sarajevo in 1914.







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CptBengal
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


I was half expecting to see Obama's name on the list.





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Xenophon
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


well, i am sure that someone did something to lead Princip to kill Ferdinand..





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Kcrad
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


05. Josef Stalin

What comedian Eddie Izzard would call a "mass-murdering frickhead," the cold, paranoid, and calculating Josef Stalin was most definitely one of - if not THE most - influential man of the last 50 years of the 20th Century. He created the Soviet empire and was the main contributor to the beginning of the Cold War. It also must be said that his Soviet Russia was the greatest contributor to the defeat of Nazi Germany in World War II.


A sociopath, serial killer? Come on, man.






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Jim Rockford
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


I would leave Princip's name off. If it hadn't been him, something else would have triggered WWI. Europe was a powderkeg and there were any number of lit matches lying around.





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RollTide1987
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

well, i am sure that someone did something to lead Princip to kill Ferdinand..


The root of the assassination of Ferdinand by Princip goes back hundreds of years.

He was a terrorist who dreamed of a unified Slavic nation.







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RollTide1987
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

I would leave Princip's name off. If it hadn't been him, something else would have triggered WWI. Europe was a powderkeg and there were any number of lit matches lying around.


A major war was most definitely coming but who is to say that things would have happened the same way had the war started a different way?






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AustinTigr
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


You're #1 was quite a surprise, but I believe 100% accurate. Ming boggling to consider that he was a proverbial 'no body', and set the course of world events the way he did.





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AustinTigr
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

well, i am sure that someone did something to lead Princip to kill Ferdinand..


The man who created the powderkeg through a series of inter-linked alliances was Otto von Bismark... old "Blood and Iron". But he was a 19th century figure, so can't be on this list.

Princip IS the man who lit the powderkeg... whether someone else would have or not can only now be speculation.






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Jim Rockford
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


surely, the details would have been different. By the same token, did Paul Tibbets change history? Absolutely. But if he had never been born, someone else would have flown the plane that dropped the bomb. I look at Princip the same way.

Maybe the war starts 6 months earlier or later. Maybe Hitler is killed in the war in this timeline. Maybe Russia stays out of it. Maybe the Communist Revolution starts in Germany or France, instead of Russia. You can play this out infinitely.






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RollTide1987
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

surely, the details would have been different. By the same token, did Paul Tibbets change history? Absolutely. But if he had never been born, someone else would have flown the plane that dropped the bomb. I look at Princip the same way.


But, like the above poster stated, it was Princip who lit the powder keg that ignited World War I and World War II. By his actions, Princip changed history, just as Paul Tibbets did. Everything else is just speculation.







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Roaad
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

I was half expecting to see Obama's name on the list.

A list compiled in 2008 would have had his name on the list.






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NHTIGER
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

well, i am sure that someone did something to lead Princip to kill Ferdinand..




Mrs. Princip told him to get his lazy arse up off the couch and go out do something useful for a change.

Behind every successful man ...






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lordguill
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

01. Gavrilo Princip


More people should know who Princip is.






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CarrolltonTiger
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

More people should know who Princip is.


Why? He's a footnote or a trivia question at best.






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Rex
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


Princip shouldn't be on the list because in actual influence he did very little. Several countries were itching for a fight and the war would have happened anyway.

John Paul II is a mere emotional choice. He did almost nothing of real political importance because he didn't have much real political power.

Lenin should be at the top of the list. The Bolshevik Revolution and subsequent dictatorship of the party probably would not have happened without his leadership.

If you operate under the assumption that what Einstein proposed would not have been proposed for many years otherwise, then Einstein belongs at the top... but I think somebody was bound to come along and theorize the same things.

You shouldn't have left out FDR and Mao.






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Volvagia
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

there wouldn't have been a Cold War


This is an honest question...but what role did WW1 have in the October Revolution?






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Rex
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

but what role did WW1 have in the October Revolution?

Since people were suffering in real terms because of Russian participation... quite a lot.






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NC_Tigah
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

Princip shouldn't be on the list because in actual influence he did very little
quote:

You shouldn't have left out FDR and Mao.
Yep.

TR is a very good choice.
Agree that Lenin should be there, perhaps in place of Stalin. Not topping the list though. Perhaps the nitwit Charles de Gaulle should be on the list somewhere too?






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LSURussian
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re: The 20th Century's Top 10 Most Influential People


quote:

This is an honest question...but what role did WW1 have in the October Revolution?


The wife of Russia's Czar Nicholas II was the niece of Germany's Kaiser Wilhelm and when the German army started a series of successful military battles against the Russian army, typical Russian xenophobia convinced the Russian masses that "that German woman" was passing along Russia's battle plans to her uncle. The Bolsheviks took advantage of this mistrust to turn the Russian people and a large part of the Russian military against the Czar, leading up to the Russian revolution.

A very good history of this is given in the book, The Last Czar.






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