History of Pro Football in New Orleans | TigerDroppings.com

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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
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History of Pro Football in New Orleans


Nice 13 part series in progress

First 3 parts get to 1962. Stories of first preseason games in City Park Stadium, etc. It gives more detail on a story that was recently mentioned on a nfl network show about the history of the NFL...

In 1962 the Dallas Texans were set to move to New Orleans. The part I didn't know was the deal breaker- Tulane refused to allow alcohol sales in the stadium. So they went to Kansas City and became the Chiefs.

Ever imagine that? Hank Stram might have been the Texans to Saints coach long before the '70s. Lamar Hunt as an owner over Mecom. 1969 would have been the only team to win a Super Bowl at it's home stadium. We would have been awed by another Purdue QB other than Brees (Dawson). Plenty of Hall of Famers would have had fleur helmets... Willie Lanier, Bobby Bell, Derrick Thomas, Louisianaian Buck Buchanon, etc

part 1
part 2
part 3







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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


series continued-

part 4
part 5

... the second game didn’t end until 12:05 a.m. Sunday morning. According to Buddy Diliberto’s sports column, it was the first time in the history of Tulane Stadium that football was played on a Sunday.

And yet, many questions were asked by Bob Roesler in the following day’s column including:

“Can College and pro football live harmoniously in Tulane Stadium?”

“Are there enough entertainment dollars in this area for both to survive?”

“Would a pro team in N.O. affect the LSU cash register?”

“Would area colleges lose patrons to the pros?”

“Would the average guy have enough loot to see five or six of his favorite collegiate home games and still have enough to spend on the pros?”

The final gate tally for the double header was 51,218, somewhat disappointing as the promoters were hoping for around 75,000. The Times-Picayune felt some of the factors leading to the resultant crowd included concerns with Tulane Stadium being integrated for the first time (though no racial issues were reported) and likely the biggest drawback was five dollar end zone tickets. To which Roesler wrote, “That’s a rather stiff tariff for the privilege of viewing the action from behind the uprights.”






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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


no history buffs, eh?

part 6



This post was edited on 7/17 at 3:20 pm


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kclsufan
New Orleans Saints Fan
Show Me
Member since Jun 2008
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


Most of us have no memory of pro football in NO before 2006. Call it PFAS--Professional Football Abuse Syndrome.





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AllsGroovn
LSU Fan
Metairie, LA
Member since Jun 2005
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


It might just be a temporary problem, but it takes a while for that page to load on my system.

Anyone else having that problem?

I'll try back later today.






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Lexo
Southeastern LA Fan
LaPlace
Member since May 2008
3436 posts

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


quote:

Anyone else having that problem?


Yes.






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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


quote:

Ever imagine that? Hank Stram might have been the Texans to Saints coach long before the '70s. Lamar Hunt as an owner over Mecom. 1969 would have been the only team to win a Super Bowl at it's home stadium. We would have been awed by another Purdue QB other than Brees (Dawson). Plenty of Hall of Famers would have had fleur helmets... Willie Lanier, Bobby Bell, Derrick Thomas, Louisianaian Buck Buchanon, etc




LINK






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Sophandros
Tulane Fan
Victoria Concordia Crescit
Member since Feb 2005
45154 posts

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


Thanks for posting this series. I'm loving this stuff. My uncles used to sell concessions at Tulane Stadium back in the day, and my grand parents sold parking on their lawn on Zimple St on gameday.





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EastBankTiger
LSU Fan
A little west of Hoover Dam
Member since Dec 2003
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 Online 

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


Was the 1965 AFL All Star game the one that was pulled out of New Orleans?





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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
20884 posts

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


yup, January

After the 1964 season, the AFL All-Star Game had been scheduled for early 1965 in New Orleans' Tulane Stadium. After numerous black players were refused service by a number of New Orleans hotels and businesses, black and white players alike lobbied for a boycott. Under the leadership of Buffalo Bills players including Cookie Gilchrist, the players put up a unified front, and the game was successfully moved to Houston's Jeppesen Stadium.

The Civil Rights Act of 1964 had just recently been passed, likely encouraging the AFL players in their cause, which was the first boycott in history of an entire city by a professional sports event.






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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


part 7
about AFL boycott of all star game

part 8
1965 NFL preseason game-

The fans would equally help Dave Dixon rally from the AFL All-Star Game fallout by producing a crowd of 75,229 for the Colts-Cardinals match-up. It was the largest crowd to watch a pro sports event in the south at the time.

The tickets prices of some $2.00 to $6.00 grossed some $229,000. The crowd was so huge that Tulane Stadium vendors ran out of soft drinks at halftime. The crowd size more than impressed visiting NFL dignitaries, but Dave Dixon’s work was not over yet.






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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
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Member since Sep 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


since everyone seems to be anxiously awaiting these ...

Names started to surface as potential owners of the predicted expansion team including Texas oilman John Mecom, Jr. & local businessman Louis Roussel Sr.

Mecom admitted to reporters he had discussions with Oakland Raiders head coach and part-owner Al Davis to sell his interests in Oakland and become a stock holder with Mecom in New Orleans. Davs would then serve as the club’s head coach and/or general manager. Another name that circulated for possible new franchise G.M. was hall of fame football player Elroy “Crazy Legs” Hirsch.

Roesler also made a prediction that Billy Cannon would end up as a player or player/coach for the New Orleans pro team. None of the trio mentioned panned out by the time the Saints came marching into the city.

But Roesler did have crystal bal success, predicting that Colts back-up quarterback Gary Cuozzo would become a member of the future New Orleans team, Colts assistant coach Chuck Noll would become an NFL head coach in the near future and a domed stadium was definitely needed for the future pro team.

part 9






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Y.A. Tittle
Winthrop Fan
Member since Sep 2003
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


Mecom was such a freaking clown.





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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
20884 posts

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


He was fricking 26 years old when he bought the franchise- or when his dad bought it for him as a present. Pretty crazy to imagine now.

Nice story on him today

“I was younger than a lot of my players,” Mecom said. “I was probably too young to appreciate how much it meant then as opposed to how much I do now later in my life.

“I think the toughest thing was probably learning to live with the criticism of a few members of the press, knowing that we'd tried to do everything we could to have a winner. But it was hard. And it still is.”

Since selling the Saints to Benson in May of 1985, Mecom has attended only three games at the Superdome.

“But I've missed very few on television,” he said.






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baytiger
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Dec 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


quote:

Mecom admitted to reporters he had discussions with Oakland Raiders head coach and part-owner Al Davis to sell his interests in Oakland and become a stock holder with Mecom in New Orleans. Davs would then serve as the club’s head coach and/or general manager.


holy frick that's a scary thought







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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


quote:

scary thought


not then, that was before Al went senile.

Raider wins per season from '67-87 (14 game season the first 10 too):

13 12 12 8 8 10 9 12 11 13 11 9 9 11 7 8 12 11 12 8 5

playoffs 15 of those 20 yrs

3 Super Bowl appearances, 2 wins






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blueslover
New Orleans Saints Fan
soon to be south of zero
Member since Sep 2007
20884 posts

re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


part 10
Sanders’ plan included a form of community ownership where he would own 52% of the team while the remaining 48% would consist of 30,000 shares that would be offered to the public for $10 each. “This football team should belong to the people of Louisiana,” Sanders explained.
The shareholders would also have priority on season tickets as well.

part 11
One day later, Congressman Celler called the manuevering “a shameful thing.”

One interesting footnote from this famous “end-around” by Long & Boggs. Just prior to votes on this measure, Rozelle was in the hallways of Congress waiting for the bill to be approved when Boggs approached him and stated in question form whther New Orleans would get the next franchise if the bill passed. Rozelle replied that he would definitely consider it. Boggs became so angry that he was going back into the House chambers to cancel the vote when Rozelle grabbed him by the shoulder and told him simply, “You got it.”

part 13
By early December 1966, members of the press core started to chime in on what the new club’s nickname should be. Some of the suggestions included the Deltas, Crescents, Kings (for King Cotton), Tigers, Generals, Moccasins, Ramparts, Creoles, Dixie Landers, Jazz Kings and Cajuns.

National media were even suggesting head coaching candidates for the new team including Baltimore assistant coach Chuck Noll, Cardinals assistant Red Miller, Packers assistant Phil Bengtson and Howard Brinker of the Browns.







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adono
LSU Fan
River Ridge
Member since Sep 2003
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re: History of Pro Football in New Orleans


quote:

Thanks for posting this series. I'm loving this stuff. My uncles used to sell concessions at Tulane Stadium back in the day, and my grand parents sold parking on their lawn on Zimple St on gameday.


I have an uncle who sold drinks (Coke-a-Cola products) in the South End Zone at Tulane. I worked every Saints and Tulane game until the Dome was built. The vendors who had Tulane Stadium weren't given a chance to move.

My uncle constantly jumped my arse that my sales weren't where they needed to be because I was watching the game...my aunt wouldn't let him fire me!






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