On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released | Page 2 | TigerDroppings.com
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Jim Rockford
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re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released

quote:

Great movie, and was banned in most parts of the country when first released due to the fear factor of the movie. Threat of nuclear war was at an extreme and most movie goers did not realize the comic genius of the film.


Fail Safe was released the same year. A dramatic movie with virtually the same premise. LINK


JombieZombie
Alabama Fan
North Alabama
Member since Nov 2009
5036 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Kubrick is overrated, according to most on the movie board. He's not.


Fenwick86
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Vermilion Parish
Member since May 2007
1123 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
quote:

Kubrick is overrated, according to most on the movie board


Unbelievable isnt it? His movies are "boring and pretentious"


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White Roach
LSU Fan
Madisonville, LA
Member since Apr 2009
3146 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
I had no idea that Fail Safe and Dr Strangelove were released around the same time. I'd always thought that Strangelove was (at least in part) a parody of Fail Safe. I also didn't know Strangelove was banned in some theaters.


Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
40329 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
quote:

I'd always thought that Strangelove was (at least in part) a parody of Fail Safe.


I thought so, too, but DS preceded FS. FS was a novel before it was a movie, so it's definitely possible Strangelove was a parody of that.


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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
78070 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
quote:

didn't know Strangelove was banned in some theaters.


AFAIK it wasn't

quote:

I had no idea that Fail Safe and Dr Strangelove were released around the same time


Not only were they produced around the same time, they were produced by the same studio.

You'd think the studio would release the drama first, and the comedy later. That certainly would have been my decision. But somehow, Stanley Kubrick was able to convince the studio executives to release Strangelove first, which killed Fail Safe commercially.

quote:

I'd always thought that Strangelove was (at least in part) a parody of Fail Safe


Actually the novel Strangelove was based on was published earlier, and the author sued the writers of Fail Safe for plagiarism.


Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
78070 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
quote:

I'm shocked a movie this good was released in January

It was originally to be released at the end of 1963, but was held back after the Kennedy assassination. There was also some recutting: Slim Pickens' line after going through the contents of the survival pack was originally "Fella could have a pretty good weekend in Dallas with all that stuff". After the assassination, this was overdubbed to "Vegas".

Also, the legendary pie fight was removed:

Image: http://www.markallencam.com/DrStrangelovePieFight.jpg


Image: http://www.wired.com/magazine/wp-content/images/19-09/ff_lost_basementtapes6_f.jpg




As was the line about Merkin Muffley (after being hit by a pie): "Our beloved president has been struck down in his prime!"

Image: http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_7J_WGI7Jygw/SWso5qRfhpI/AAAAAAAAAGw/Lv3R4WFG2S4/s320/Dr+Strangelove+01.jpg


The pie fight sequence supposedly still exists, edited and scored, but the Kubrick estate refuses to show it publicly.

Image: http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lr9obpDctL1qdf16no1_500.jpg


W
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2007
6100 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Quality post. Tons of beta and footage I've never seen.

The scenes in the plane alone are golden.



Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
40329 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Another oddity: The white sands of Destin, FL, stood in for the snows of Siberia in the aerial scenes. LINK


Placebeaux
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re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Great stuff. A lot of this I did not know.


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White Roach
LSU Fan
Madisonville, LA
Member since Apr 2009
3146 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
The plagiarism lawsuit story is crazy... Kafka and Rockford (and others) coming up with some good stuff in this thread!

My father was a SAC guy in the USAF. Or, as he always said, "I worked for Curtis LeMay." He LOVED Dr Strangelove!

It used to come on TV as the late (10:30 or 11:00pm) movie when I was small and my Dad would let me and my brothers stay up late (or he would sometimes wake us up!) to watch Dr Strangelove. He thought that movie was the greatest!


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JawjaTigah
LSU Fan
South of Tampa
Member since Sep 2003
12423 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
I think it is one of the best and most brilliant movies of my lifetime. Oh, and the darkly funniest one, too. Great cast. And the 3 roles Sellers plays are perfect. I didn't realize that he was playing all 3 back when I first saw the movie in '64 - but then I was still a kid (14). Didn't take me long to catch on, though. It remains on my top 3 fave movies list.
Kong
This post was edited on 1/30 at 1:57 pm


Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
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re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Image: http://i.imgur.com/FxYNjqS.jpg width=750


Peter Sellers began shooting the role of Major Kong





But... The official story is Sellers twisted his ankle and couldn't work in the confined cockpit set. But I think he simply couldn't do a larger than life cowboy character.

So Sellers gave up the role (which had been offered to John Wayne,) It was then offered to Bonanza's Dan "Hoss" Blocker, whose agent turned it down -- Blocker later claimed this was done without his knowledge, and that he would have accepted the role.

So Kubrick cast a veteran western actor he'd originally cast as a heavy in One Eyed Jacks (and who remained in that cast even after Kubrick was fired by Brando).

Image: http://image2.findagrave.com/photos/2012/159/8343106_133918552059.jpg width=500


The story goes that when Slim Pickens first showed up on the Strangelove set in his his Stetson and cowboy boots, the English crew marveled that he was already in character -- they were unaware this former rodeo clown always dressed like that.

"I been accused of bein' an actor -- but I'm a cowboy" -- Slim Pickens

Image: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/73/Slim-pickens_riding-the-bomb_enh-lores.jpg/300px-Slim-pickens_riding-the-bomb_enh-lores.jpg width=750


This post was edited on 1/30 at 9:18 pm


VOR
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Lap of Luxury
Member since Apr 2009
44105 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
quote:

I don't get it.


Okay.

quote:

Must be me.


Oh, it assuredly is.

One of the most brilliant dark comedies on film. Frankly, I'm not sure anything is in the same ballpark. Being an old fart (but still one cool motherfricker), I remember going to theater to watch it twice in one weekend.


boom roasted
Member since Sep 2010
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Online

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Okay.


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Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
78070 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Much of the credit for Dr. Strangelove must go to screenwriter Terry Southern. The humor in the script comes from Southern (born and raised in a small Texas town South of Dallas). He set the foundation for Kubrick and Sellers.



Image: http://img159.imageshack.us/img159/2917/booksfeature11238bd6.jpg width=300


Terry Southern interview

quote:


What was the status of the Dr. Strangelove script before Stanley Kubrick decided to hire you in the fall of 1962?

When Kubrick and Peter George first began to do the script, they were trying to stick to the melodrama in George's book, Red Alert. There was an outline. They didn't go into a treatment but went straight into a script. They had a few pages and in fact had started shooting, but in a very tentative way. Kubrick realized that it was not going to work. You can't do the end of the world in a conventionally dramatic way or boy-meets-girl way. You have to do it in some way that reflects your awareness that it is important and serious. It has to be a totally different treatment, and black humor is the way to go. That was Kubrick's decision.

When you first got together with Kubrick, did you start changing the tone of the script right away?

Yeah, after the first day, at our first meeting, he told me what the situation was. All those things that I've told you were his very words. "It's too important to be treated in the conventional way. It's unique! The end of the world is surely a unique thing, so forget about the ordinary treatment of subject and go for something like a horror film." He decided to use humor. The flavor that attracted him in my novel The Magic Christian could be effective in this new approach. He would talk about the mechanics of making it totally credible and convincing in terms of the fail-safe aspect and then how to make that funny. And the way you make it funny, because the situation is absurd, is by dealing with it in terms of the dialogue and characters.

I'm curious about the day-to-day working relationship with Kubrick as you wrote the film from the preproduction period through the actual shooting.

Well, after my first day in London when he told me what he had in mind, I got settled into a hotel room not far from where he lived in Kensington. That night, I wrote the first scene, and then he picked me up at four-thirty the next morning in a limo. The limo was a big Rolls or Bentley. We rode in the backseat with the light on. There was this desk that folded down. It was very much like a train compartment. It was totally dark outside. If it got light, we would pull the shades down. He would read the script pages; then we would rewrite them and prepare them for shooting when we got to the studio, which was about an hour to an hour-and-a-half drive depending on the fog.



Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
40329 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Here's a USAF training film from around that time called Power of Decision, about a simulated nuclear war. Quite Strangelovian itself, complete with a Big Board. At one point they're giving a damage report and talking about the estimated sixty million casualties as acceptable losses or some such. LINK
This post was edited on 2/2 at 5:59 pm


Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
78070 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Interesting - saved to watch later

Nothing to do with Strangleove, but:

Stumbled onto this last night. A propaganda film on the Green Berets in 'Nam, narrated by James Arness c. 1965:

The Big Picture - "The Hidden War In Vietnam"

This 1968 propaganda film was the last work of John Ford:

Vietnam! Vietnam!


Kafka
New Orleans Saints Fan
Remember landscaping the Alamo
Member since Jul 2007
78070 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released


W
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Nov 2007
6100 posts

re: On this day in history 1964. Dr Strangelove was released
Went to my Kubrick collection last night to watch.

It wasnt there. fricking Barry Lyndon but no Strangelove.

I've been had.


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