Poverty in America | TigerDroppings.com

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carbola
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Middle East
Member since Aug 2010
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Poverty in America


LINK (blog post)

quote:

Poverty rose 4 percent in America last year.

That’s what the government says.

Common sense, however, says something different.

Common sense says that, compared to the standard of history and the rest of the world, there is no poverty in America.

Don’t shoot me yet.

I’m not saying people don’t have it hard. I’m not saying people don’t have financial catastrophes. I’m not saying there isn’t an economic underclass. I’m not saying people don’t go to bed wondering where they’re going to find the money they need.

I know about financial hard times.

And I know about doing without.

But I don’t think there is poverty in America.

Not true poverty.

Face it, most of our poor people are fat. And have cable TV.

And a cell phone, with customized rings. And a bed and a roof and inside plumbing and a benefits card to keep the refrigerator filled.

Poor people in America can afford cigarettes and beer, or marijuana. Poor people in America get the best health care in the world.

That all may sound like an unfair indictment of the poor, or as some insensitive screed, but the simple fact is that, no matter how hard things get, nobody in America needs to go to bed hungry or go to bed outdoors.

Many do, but mostly it is because of their own choices or incompetence or because of the neglect of their parents. Services and benefits are available to all, from the government and from charities, and those who end up going without are usually those who have squandered their opportunities or allotments.


quote:

The question is: Why?

The answer is that poverty, as we define it, has become a powerful tool for social engineers and politicians. Specifically, it is the lever being used to push our country into socialism.

By broadly and incorrectly declaring poverty, activists attack our economic system from the top and from the bottom. By creating the perception of poverty, they give themselves an argument for more social welfare programs. By pointing at the supposedly impoverished, they make the argument for expanded government compassion.

That increases the load on taxpayers and hastens the transfer of wealth from those who produce to those who don’t produce. It creates the social expectation – contrary to our national tradition – that the poor have claim on the resources of the non-poor.

By doing this, the concept of individual property rights is eroded. If money is the means of acquiring property, and increased amounts of money can be taxed to support the poor, then the possession of property is substantially jeopardized. And a fundamental American freedom is endangered.

Broadly defining poverty also creates class envy and division, which is the engine of socialism. Increasing the number of people who see themselves as poor increases the constituency for more entitlement programs or policies. It also fosters anger on the part of the supposedly impoverished, which creates social instability.

As poverty grows, so does the government. As taxation rises, freedom falls.

Both dangerous trends are encouraged by our mistaken concept of poverty. It seems like a minor matter, just one more government statistic, but it is a major thread in the spider’s web that entangles our national liberties.

Certainly, times can be hard. Money can be exasperating. Bankruptcy and economic failure are real. Many families struggle throughout their lives with money issues.

But nobody said life would be free of struggle.

And nobody should think that the difficulties faced by the poorest of Americans are anything like the daily reality of millions around the globe.

Who would be offended if you told them they were poor.


What's your take?







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BayouBengal51
LSU Fan
Alexandria, Louisiana
Member since Nov 2006
4309 posts

re: Poverty in America


Spot on in my opinion. The part that really illustrates his point is the comment about the poor having cable TV and a cell phone. I know people who live at or below the poverty line, but they have a big screen TV and cable while being on food stamps or some form of assistance.

I'd rather be "poor" in the USA than "rich" in Zimbabwe or some other 3rd world country where access to clean water is seen as a extravagant luxury rather than the norm.



This post was edited on 2/7 at 7:26 am


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SlowFlowPro
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Simple Solutions to Complex Probs
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re: Poverty in America


there is a societal concept of fearing complacency, especially with the ilk who want to socially engineer society through government. if it's not an actual sociological/political science term, one day i'm going to develop it

but it's similar to racism. over time we did such a good job in fighting poverty that it was essentially eliminated on any real scale. people, especially who gain personal benefits from the industry of fighting poverty, fear complacency, so they expand the definition of poverty so that they can maintain the industry

God built the universe and Earth in 6 days and then realized he had done good things and rested on the 7th. government refuses to do that



This post was edited on 2/7 at 7:38 am


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Ace Midnight
LSU Fan
Ball, LA - Home, Sweet Home
Member since Dec 2006
29446 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

What's your take?


I find little with which I can find fault in this.






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ShoeBang
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since May 2012
4617 posts

re: Poverty in America


Well written and honest. And, IMO, true.





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Poodlebrain
LSU Fan
Way Right of Rex
Member since Jan 2004
15206 posts

re: Poverty in America


We've removed the stigma of shame for being incapable of providing for yourself and your family. People receiving government assistance now wear it like a badge of honor. We will not begin to fix the problem until we acknowledge that it is a problem and restore the concept of shame.





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dante
LSU Fan
Kingwood, TX
Member since Mar 2006
7797 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

What's your take?
The truth will set you free!
As truthful as that article was, do you know what would happen if a Republican made those same points in public? He would get clobbered by the media and the Dems for being an uncaring SOB. If we talk about these things we are racists or selfish. If you can't talk honestly about the problems how can they get fixed?






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Taxing Authority
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Feb 2010
22417 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

Common sense says that, compared to the standard of history and the rest of the world, there is no poverty in America.
This.

quote:


The answer is that poverty, as we define it, has become a powerful tool for social engineers and politicians. Specifically, it is the lever being used to push our country into socialism.
And this.

The truth is we (as Americans) are all rich. Every one of us. It's just that some are thankful for what they have, and others are jealous that others have more.

If my Grandfather (who really was poor for most of his life) were alive to see how "poor" people live today, he'd laugh. Of course, he'd also not understand the concept of driving to a place to "work out" when one could tend to a garden or do chores around the home.






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Taxing Authority
LSU Fan
Houston
Member since Feb 2010
22417 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

but it's similar to racism. over time we did such a good job in fighting poverty that it was essentially eliminated on any real scale. people, especially who gain personal benefits from the industry of fighting poverty, fear complacency, so they expand the definition of poverty so that they can maintain the industry
Excellent point.






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ShortyRob
LSU Fan
Huntsville, AL
Member since Oct 2008
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re: Poverty in America


quote:

What's your take?
My take is that it's true.

The American definition of "poverty" is a farce. At best, it's just a dumb example of our modern society. At worst, it's fricking insulting to a substantial portion of the world.

What we call "poverty", from a "needs being met" perspective, is fricking downright wealthy to billions of people.






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Mo Jeaux
LSU Fan
NYC
Member since Aug 2008
12842 posts

re: Poverty in America


Not sure about your fear of complacency, but there is a good bit of Parkinson's Law here, as there is in any government bureaucracy. Bureaucracy's job is not to address the alleged problem or matter it was created to address, but rather, to expand that problem or matter, and in doing so, expand itself.





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wiltznucs
South Florida Fan
Apollo Beach, FL
Member since Sep 2005
7654 posts

re: Poverty in America


I had a Professor once pose the question "What would happen if we eliminated Welfare in all forms this is to include Welfare checks, Medicaid, Medicare, etc in the United States."

A few in the class suggested that those often uneducated and unskilled "freeloaders" would be forced to get a job and move forward. Almost as if to suggest that we had done them a favor. Other students suggested there would be riots in the streets and violence against the so called well to do as the primal human survival instincts kick in. There have been countless episodes of this type of violence throughout history over perceived social injustices. I'm sure there are other potential responses as well.

I believe the point the Professor was trying to make it that while these entitlement programs may seem philosophically objectionable there is an often overlooked element of safety and collective societal wellbeing from having them. If a group wants and is okay with the meager existence provided by a Welfare check and it keeps them from harming other societal members then maybe the programs are worth it. Of course this argument loses traction when you see crime rates for robberies, etc which are often committed by entitlement recipients.

Personally, I think Pandora's box is open and will never be closed again. Call me an idealist, but if we want entitlements to end it would seem more effective if we convinced the entitlement recipients to move away from them electively. Understandibly a very tall order...




This post was edited on 2/7 at 8:30 am


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Jma313
Mississippi St. Fan
Member since Aug 2010
3413 posts

re: Poverty in America


I'd rather be broke in America than rich in Ghana.





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ShortyRob
LSU Fan
Huntsville, AL
Member since Oct 2008
26534 posts
 Online 

re: Poverty in America


quote:

Of course this argument loses traction when you see crime rates for robberies, etc which are often committed by entitlement recipients
Ya think? LOL

To this day, the best way to avoid crime is to simply not live near criminals. Giving them shite in the hopes they wont break into your house is a COMPLETE waste of time.







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Placebeaux
LSU Fan
One man's LOL is another man's WTF
Member since Jun 2008
24104 posts

re: Poverty in America


I'd like to know how much the middle class grew or srunk?





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ShoeBang
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
Member since May 2012
4617 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

We've removed the stigma of shame for being incapable of providing for yourself and your family. People receiving government assistance now wear it like a badge of honor. We will not begin to fix the problem until we acknowledge that it is a problem and restore the concept of shame.


ARE YOU IN MY BRAIN?

I agree with this. It is time to judge, blame and shame those who draw upon the system while having the ability to pay into it instead.






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Papercutninja
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Feb 2010
786 posts

re: Poverty in America


I argued this very point with several individuals in a class about urban legal problems. The majority of the students were African American and talked about poverty in the relative American sense. I then conveyed some of my experiences with true poverty abroad in a recently toppled third world dictatorship. Specifically that the vast majority of those citizens had no running water, little clothing, meager nutrition and non-existent healthcare.

The overall reception of my views was eye-rolling and teeth sucking. The general feeling from the other students was as Americans we are entitled to a different level of poverty. As if to say that the mere fact of being born in this great land afforded one the right to their fair share of entitlements. Not the opportunity to be great but the right to be below average. The assistance was provided not to survive but to maintain that to which the rest of society had become accustomed.

It was pretty eye opening to hear soon to be young professionals that would be actively contributing to the tax base talk so positively about what has put this country on a European-esque decline.






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Nuts4LSU
LSU Fan
Washington, DC
Member since Oct 2003
18225 posts

re: Poverty in America


I stopped reading this horse manure at...

quote:

no matter how hard things get, nobody in America needs to go to bed hungry or go to bed outdoors. Many do, but mostly it is because of their own choices or incompetence or because of the neglect of their parents. Services and benefits are available to all, from the government and from charities, and those who end up going without are usually those who have squandered their opportunities or allotments.






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anc
Member since Nov 2012
1704 posts

re: Poverty in America


I agree with most of what he says.

quote:

"That increases the load on taxpayers and hastens the transfer of wealth from those who produce to those who don't produce. It creates the social expectation - contrary to our national tradition - that the poor have claim on the resources of the non-poor."


The wealth is not transferred to those who don't produce. Those who don't produce consume the wealth and it ends up in the hands of the mega-wealthy. Higher taxes reduce income and the opportunity to accumulate wealth. Reward is not worth the risk or the effort. In the end, there will be more poverty and fewer "wealthy" or "upper middle class."






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Mo Jeaux
LSU Fan
NYC
Member since Aug 2008
12842 posts

re: Poverty in America


quote:

I stopped reading this horse manure at...


I would posit that per capita, that was a pretty accurate description. Your mileage may vary, and sounds like it does. Why don't you tell us why?






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