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Ole Miss Fan
Locker Room
Member since Sep 2010
8785 posts

Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
So, our farm in SW MS has some Indian Mounds.

Since 2013 a major research University on the East Coast (I won't dox them for now) has been doing some excavation work on the place.

The head archaeologist is the girl in the baseball cap. Really professional and bright. She's doing her PhD dissertation on our site, and some related sites in SW MS.

This weekend she gave my family a tour and showed us some of the things she has found.

FAQs

This is the Coles Creek band of the Natchez Indians. Or, more accurately "Coles Creek Culture" .

Natives have been in the area for about 10,000 years. But they didn't start building Mounds until about 1000-1200 years ago.

These were ceremonial mounds. Not burial mounds. They used them for feasts and religious ceremonies.

They hunted as well as farmed corn, beans, and small grains.

The main thing she's interested in is their diet. She determines this by collecting the black soil in the layers. This is where they burned the food offerings. Or where they burned their trash after a feast (not sure which).

She takes this soil back to the lab, and basically boils it in a solution. And then analyzes the fat that bubbles up and can determine a lot about their diet (how much deer, bear, fish, corn).

There's also lots of pottery in the mounds. Lots of flakes and a few projectile points.

The grinding stones were found by a neighbor. Not on our mounds. They're used for grinding corn and acorns into flour.

The round stone is a Chunky stone. From a game they played where they would roll the stone along a flat course and throw spears at it.

That's about it. Just thought you guys would enjoy.

Image: https://i.imgur.com/PZfmFrE.jpg

Image: https://i.imgur.com/wPcOTfU.jpg

Image: https://i.imgur.com/JKbmTq8.jpg

Image: https://i.imgur.com/ByUpMwI.png


Walkerdog14
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2014
858 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
I love stuff like this, it’s amazing the kind of tools that the natives used in every day life. Thanks for sharing.


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ItzMe1972
Member since Dec 2013
5919 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
I was watching YouTube videos of arrowhead hunters in TX.

They also were looking in the black and burned levels of the soils.

Thanks for sharing.


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Jack Daniel
LSU Fan
In the bottle
Member since Feb 2013
19887 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
She dug that hole by hand? Shit, give me her number


gumbo2176
Member since May 2018
9221 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Several years ago a family friend contacted me about one of their friends who was from Honduras and asked if I was interested in making a display stand for the guy to display corn grinding tools his grandma had used when he was a kid to grind corn to make totillas.

These 2 pieces were just like the stones you have with a large stone with a bowl shape cut into it and a round stone to act as a mortar and pestle tool to grind the grains they use to make breads and meals with.

I made it for him out of mahogany and he has it displayed in his house here in N.O.

Cool that they found this on your property and good on you for allowing them to dig to discover these artifacts.


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beulahland
LSU Fan
Little D'arbonne
Member since Jan 2013
2739 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Cool


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turkish
Member since Aug 2016
479 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Too cool. Are the mounds easily distinguishable, being in the hills? Are they mounds on top of hills or down in a hollow?


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No Colors
Ole Miss Fan
Locker Room
Member since Sep 2010
8785 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
quote:

Are the mounds easily distinguishable, being in the hills? Are they mounds on top of hills or down in a hollow?


Yes. They're basically on a flat plateau on a bluff overlooking a river. There's farm land all around. They are very obvious.

The land around them has also been flattened and terra formed. They can tell this by putting in some test pits. There's removal and fill everywhere. Almost like they used borrow pits to build the mounds. And then later filled them back in and leveled the site.

Or, they built some sort of amphitheater around the mounds. And then someone (maybe them or maybe European settlers) came in and filled it all back in.

There's many lifetimes of work to be done here. We are not even scratching the surface.


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plazadweller
Auburn Fan
South Georgia
Member since Jul 2011
10110 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
That’s cool af. If any of you have a piece of property along a creek/river you can easily find this stuff if you know where to look. I have a large ridge that works along the creek and there was a village in one of my food plots. We’ve found all of that type of stuff in a few digs. I use to harrow up the plot and go walk it after a good rain. We’ve found tons of pottery, banner stones, points, grinding stones, blades etc


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plazadweller
Auburn Fan
South Georgia
Member since Jul 2011
10110 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
When you see an Indian mound you’ll know it. I’ve seen them in the middle of an open meadow on the edge of a river or creek.


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Crawdaddy
USA Fan
Slidell. The jewel of Louisiana
Member since Sep 2006
17138 posts
 Online 

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
There’s a 400 yard long mound in pearlington Mississippi off the East Pearl. Studies have been done and lots to read on Hancock historical society website. Wish the state would open it up as a historical site to the public.


ChenierauTigre
LSU Fan
Dreamland
Member since Dec 2007
33445 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Man, thanks for posting it. Stuff like this is really cool. I wanted to be an archaeologist.


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prostyleoffensetime
USA Fan
Mississippi
Member since Aug 2009
10049 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Damn, that’s some good stuff they found.

We farm a place that was a trading grounds from two different eras. Had an archaeological dig done about 6 years ago to verify it wasn’t any burials in the area so they could divert a highway.

Saw a lot of similar stuff. Lots of trash dugouts, pottery, arrowheads, etc. they were able to determine where structures were. They determined it was a trading ground by the diversity of rocks they found, stuff from Appalachia, New Mexico area, Great Lakes area.


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tigahfromtheham
LSU Fan
Trussvegas
Member since Jun 2005
4943 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Awesome story and pics. Thanks for sharing. As soon as I can remember how to post pics I’ll show a piece made from different points I saw the other day. It’s impressive


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Manchac Man
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2014
1406 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
That’s pretty cool stuff. Our place is on Coles Creek and the Trace cuts through it as well. I often wonder what’s hidden with all the history in the area.


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AutoYes_Clown
USA Fan
Baton Rouge, LA
Member since Oct 2012
4212 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Very cool!

quote:

The main thing she's interested in is their diet. She determines this by collecting the black soil in the layers. This is where they burned the food offerings. Or where they burned their trash after a feast (not sure which).

She takes this soil back to the lab, and basically boils it in a solution. And then analyzes the fat that bubbles up and can determine a lot about their diet (how much deer, bear, fish, corn).


I dont believe this one bit.

Image: https://y.yarn.co/75908c4c-9bc4-438f-a048-95bc45c0592f_text.gif


Image: https://y.yarn.co/229d9956-cdd2-4f9b-bfce-d45fd91dc907_text.gif


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Bigfishchoupique
Member since Jul 2017
4866 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
quote:

She dug that hole by hand? Shit, give me her number


With a small masonry trowel 10 centimeters at a time and ran every bit of spoil through a “screen shake box “ with 3/8 hardware cloth on the bottom. Good job.

Great post. We did something similar at Poverty Point while I was in college for extra credit in the summer. The mounds there were built 1100-1700 BC.


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Bigfishchoupique
Member since Jul 2017
4866 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
Those grinding stones sure are nice.


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Priapus
South Carolina
Member since Oct 2012
1644 posts

re: Indian Mound Archaeology at the farm
In a primitive culture, not disposable like ours, why would anyone, much less a whole tribe, throw their hunting tools at a round rock? Wouldn't that be like getting the Shady Swamp Deer Club to all throw their rifles at a tree for fun?

ETA- Nice finds, thank you for sharing and letting the university dig the site.
This post was edited on 6/15 at 8:51 am


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