Posted by
Message
Terrific Tales
LSU Fan
Member since Jan 2019
14792 posts

Diving: Someone Explain
For most sports, I’m able to pick up the scoring system and know what to look for pretty quickly

I have just absolutely never understood diving

They always say it has to do with minimizing splash, being vertical, and being tight in the air

But every time I watch what looks like the exact same dive, pikes somersaults or whatever, and I see someone jump and enter seemingly perfectly vertical, and with very little splash, and get a decent score

Then without fail, the people at the end of the round come up and do the same dive, and it looks, even in slow motion, almost the exact same, but they score like 10 points higher

I just don’t get what I’m missing


Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
84437 posts
 Online 

re: Diving: Someone Explain
It's like the referees not seeing holding when Bama is on offense.


Bestbank Tiger
Florida Fan
Premium Member
Member since Jan 2005
59995 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
All I know is the high dive is a nope for me.

Nope nope nope nope nope nope nope.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
41
LaLadyinTx
LSU Fan
Cypress, TX
Member since Nov 2018
1649 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
They look different to me, but I’ve watched a lot of it since my daughter was a diver.

Look for feet coming apart, toe points not being as good (Chinese are GREAT at this form stuff). When they go into the water perfectly, you not only don’t see splash, but also 2 air bubbles coming up on the side of them after they get I to the water. That’s from the way they do their hands.

Sometimes they get a dive into the water well, but it’s still a bit over or under rotated. We can guess pretty well at the scores, but maybe it’s just cuz I’ve had a lot of practice.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
30
Got Blaze
LSU Fan
Youngsville
Member since Dec 2013
5607 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
I began diving when I was 6 yrs old at local country clubs during each summer. I was an average diver, no where near the best in my age group. Quit when I was 15 because I was more into partying, football, and wrestling. Also other kids were doing fwd. , back, inward, and reverse 2 1/2’s in tuck & pike positions and I could barely do a double tuck. Good friend of mine dove for LSU in the late 80’s. Scoring is subjective which is why they have 7 judges, throw out the high & low scores, then keep the 5 remaining. Here are the rules on scoring When you watch enough dives, meets, performances, you get a better understanding of how they will score dives. Kinda like gymnastics. Most of the dives are good ~ very good.

10: Excellent
8½-9½: Very good
7-8: Good
5-6½: Satisfactory
2½-4½: Deficient
½-2: Unsatisfactory
0: Completely failed


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
40
TD SponsorTD Fan
USA
Member since 2001
Thank you for supporting our sponsors
Advertisement
BluegrassBelle
Kentucky Fan
RIP Hefty Lefty - 1981-2019
Member since Nov 2010
85616 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
Something to watch for that I’ve seen that gets missed easily is someone’s body rotating just enough to the side that they don’t enter on the same exact “line” (you can really only see it in a shot from above). I’m pretty sure that was what gave Daly and partner a leg up on the Chinese divers the other day. It was ever so slight.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
13
ReauxlTide222
Alabama Fan
St. Petersburg
Member since Nov 2010
69883 posts
 Online 

re: Diving: Someone Explain
quote:

It's like the referees not seeing holding when Bama is on offense.
Or defense, seeing as nobody gets called for holding against them


Rudy40
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge,La
Member since Jan 2007
2534 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
Reauxl Tide 222...............Are you serious?? That is hilarious


ReauxlTide222
Alabama Fan
St. Petersburg
Member since Nov 2010
69883 posts
 Online 

re: Diving: Someone Explain
quote:

Reauxl Tide 222...............Are you serious?? That is hilarious
I’m nearly 100% positive Alabama opponents get called for holding less than any teams’ opponents in the country.

Image: https://i.imgur.com/l4LvgM0.jpg


Hilarious
This post was edited on 8/2 at 10:56 am


TU Rob
Troy Fan
Birmingham
Member since Nov 2008
11852 posts

re: Diving: Someone Explain
quote:

Scoring diving isn’t completely subjective. Each degree of difficulty is determined by an extremely thorough formula created by the Fédération Internationale de Natation (the International Swimming Federation, or FINA). Five components—number of somersaults, flight position, number of twists, type of approach, and unnatural entry—are given a point difficulty, added together to make the dive’s degree of difficulty.

Let’s take an example: Olympic champion Greg Louganis made famous the reverse three-and-a-half somersault tuck, which is now a standard men’s dive. FINA currently gives this dive a difficulty level of 3.5. The three and a half somersaults give this dive a baseline difficulty of 2.8, and the approach (“reverse,” which means that the diver is facing the water when he leaves the springboard but spins backward) tacks on an additional 0.3 point. Then, there’s an additional 0.4 point for “unnatural entry,” which reflects the difficulty of entering the water, since the diver’s body position prevents him from seeing the water before entry. There aren’t any twists in this dive, and the flight position (the tuck) isn’t deemed difficult enough to merit extra points. Let’s say Louganis performed the reverse three-and-a-half tuck and received the following scores from the judges: 7, 7.5, 7.5, 8.0, 8.0, 8.0, and 8.5. We lop off the two highest and the two lowest scores, which leaves us with the three scores 7.5, 8.0, and 8.0. Louganis’s score for this dive, then, would be the sum of these scores (23.5) multiplied by the difficulty (3.5), which is 82.25.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
first pageprev pagePage 1 of 1next pagelast page
refresh

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram