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RollTide1987
Alabama Fan
Washington, D.C.
Member since Nov 2009
53216 posts

Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
I'm sure this thread will get whacked eventually because we can't have nice things, but I post this only for its historical value. Catholic services aren't what they used to be. Prior to Vatican II, much of what you see in this video was the norm for centuries. It's a unique window into the past.

The show starts at the 3:50 mark.

YouTube
This post was edited on 3/5 at 8:57 pm


GreenRockTiger
LSU Fan
Member since Jun 2020
5213 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
There are still some traditional Latin Masses in some places.


Spankum
LSU Fan
Miss-sippi
Member since Jan 2007
51332 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
I don’t know if it is still the case, but their used to be a Latin mass said every Sunday in Lafayette, LA every Sunday


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40
RollTide1987
Alabama Fan
Washington, D.C.
Member since Nov 2009
53216 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
quote:

There are still some traditional Latin Masses in some places.


Indeed there are. I attend one every Sunday.


GreenRockTiger
LSU Fan
Member since Jun 2020
5213 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
quote:

Indeed there are. I attend one every Sunday.


Cool!

I used to go once in a while - I don’t have that many long skirts and I misplaced my head covering.


thejudge
USA Fan
Westlake, LA
Member since Sep 2009
10777 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
Cathedral in LC does them.

Father Thomas I believe does it regularly. There are usually red books the way in that you can follow along with. One page is English and the opposing Latin.



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60
PowerTool
Houston Astros Fan
The dark side of the road
Member since Dec 2009
16879 posts
 Online 

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
I really liked the Latin liturgy, but the women in head coverings and "modest dress" kind of surprised me. It was only one small group at this one parish that did that, so it was weird to me even when I was used to the service.


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32
PureMetairie
LSU Fan
Metairie
Member since May 2017
551 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
If you're in Baton Rouge, hit up St. Agnes. They do a Latin mass and it's excellent.

There just simply isn't a comparison to the novus ordo mass.

Beautiful stuff.


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11
BottomlandBrew
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2010
22800 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
No wonder Luther started his own club. A drum kit, a baptismal pool, and a youth pastor with a soul patch and puka necklace really spices worship up.

On a more serious note, it's a little interesting to see as someone not brought up in that world. Not for me, but doesn't have to be.
This post was edited on 3/5 at 10:19 pm


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DownSouthJukin
Ole Miss Fan
The Cheap Seats
Member since Jan 2014
20012 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
St. Patrick’s on Camp St. in NO has them.


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30
HECM62
New Orleans Saints Fan
NOLA
Member since May 2016
426 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
Our Lady of Good Counsel used to do them. My granny used to go because it reminded her of the "good ol days".


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TigerstuckinMS
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2005
30201 posts
 Online 

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
"Hi. I'm Fred. My hobbies are watching foreign films in languages I don't understand, without subtitles, and the Latin Rite."
This post was edited on 3/5 at 11:06 pm


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Hopeful Doc
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2010
12548 posts
 Online 

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
quote:

show starts at the 3:50 mark



Of course it does...


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60
Jim Rockford
LSU Fan
Member since May 2011
82193 posts
 Online 

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
No burning heretics. Not legit.


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03
lsuwontonwrap
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2012
33972 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
The good old days when you said prayers and didn't know what the hell you were saying.


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44
obdobd918
Member since Jun 2020
1864 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
quote:

When did we start celebrating Mass in Latin?
The instinct of Christianity has always been that people should worship in a language they understand.

The first language of Christian liturgy was Aramaic, the common language of the first Christians, who were Palestinian Jews. While Hebrew was the language of scripture and formal worship, Christian worship occurred in the home where Aramaic was spoken. The words Abba and maranatha are Aramaic.

Christianity quickly spread from Palestine to the rest of the world, and the Eucharist came to be celebrated in many languages, including Syriac, Coptic, and Armenian. In most of the Mediterranean world, the common language was Greek, which became the language of liturgy in that region and remained so until the early third century.

Eucharist itself is a Greek word, meaning thanksgiving. The phrase Kyrie eleison and the words liturgy, baptism, evangelize, martyr, and catechumen, among other familiar church words, are also Greek in origin.

From around the third century B.C., what we call “classical” Latin was the language of the Roman aristocracy and the educated classes. Around the time Jesus was born, during the reign of Augustus Caesar, the language began to change. The Roman aristocracy was destroyed by war and political infighting; when they disappeared, their language went with them. Classical Latin was replaced by a less refined version of the language.

In the third and fourth centuries A.D. this form of Latin began to replace Greek as the common language of the Roman world and soon became the language of the liturgy.

Exactly how this change in the liturgy came about is uncertain. In the early church the liturgy was led extemporaneously by the bishop, according to a pattern. There were written examples of Eucharistic Prayers, but they were models, not prescribed prayers. The last such document in Greek was written around the year 215. By the sixth century, the Roman Canon (which is still in use, also called Eucharistic Prayer I) appears, completely in Latin and prescribed for use exactly as written.

What happened during those centuries? It seems that a core of the Roman Canon was developed and used first, probably even in liturgies that were partly in Greek and partly in Latin, until the final Latin version evolved. Because Christians had not used Latin for worship prior to this, words had to be adapted or imported (often from Greek) to express Christian ideas, beginning the development of an ecclesiastical form of Latin. There is also evidence that the Roman Canon was influenced by prayers from the Eastern churches.

Even though Latin evolved into various modern languages, Latin remained the sole language of the Roman Rite until the Second Vatican Council returned to the original instinct of Christianity that people should worship in a language they understand.


AustinTigr
LSU Fan
Austin, TX
Member since Dec 2004
2829 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
St. Martin de Porres Parish in Dripping Springs Texas has a Latin Mass every Sunday. Most of the women wear veils.During the height of the COVID fear-monger, it was the most attended in-person Mass.

Stay close to the Latin Mass community. The devil is attacking the Church and Christianity as a whole full-force. It is the Latin Mass community that will stay true to Catholic teaching.
This post was edited on 3/6 at 6:33 am


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50
tigahbruh
LSU Fan
Louisiana
Member since Jun 2014
1499 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
I'd attend more regularly if they still did the Latin. Makes it majestic and mystical.

Vernacular makes it mundane and boring. People zone out on the readings in English anyway.


Bullfrog
LSU Fan
but I left before halftime.
Member since Jul 2010
48784 posts

re: Historical recreation of a 15th Century Catholic Latin Mass
quote:

I'd attend more regularly if they still did the Latin. Makes it majestic and mystical.
There is a very nice one in Baton Rouge a block off Florida Blvd on Oak Villa. FWIW

ETA: Next to Custom Security. Most Blessed Mary something. IKR
This post was edited on 3/6 at 7:19 am


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