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bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

Stick Built Workshop?

Everybody seems to build either pole barns, red iron buildings, or one of these galvanized pole barn type buildings. After they are built it seems like people go and insulate them, run wires, and even will brick them in certain places to match their house.

I’m wondering why I don’t see any that have regular stud walls going to the trusses. It seems like that would be pretty affordable, easier to sheathe and match your house, insulate, etc. and then you’d have studs everywhere to mount stuff.

Does anybody have one built like this? Is there a reason they aren’t common down here?


Obtuse1
Wofford Fan
Westside Bodymore Yo
Member since Sep 2016
18435 posts

Pole barns and steel buildings are cheaper for the structure itself. Depending on how you want to insulate, heat/cool, wire and finish the walls they can easily approach stick build costs.

My woodshop is stick built but I didn't have a choice due to restrictions. I have no need for high ceilings though. 12' is more than enough and helps with heating and cooling costs.


bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

Thanks for the input. Do you have trusses or you have posts to break up the span with a cieling?


SurfOrYak
LSU Fan
BR/MsDelta
Member since Jul 2015
338 posts

Build shop with standard height stud walls and cathedral ceiling (large LVL ridge beam to carry roof rafters) to create wide open space below. No trusses or posts. Cathedral ceilings are a little extra hassle with the ridge beam install and airflow/insulation of roof, but space created for work area was well worth it.


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DownshiftAndFloorIt
LSU Fan
Here
Member since Jan 2011
62190 posts

quote:

Does anybody have one built like this


Me, kinda.

quote:

Is there a reason they aren’t common down here?


It's more expensive than a steel building when you are going for long unsupported spans and high ceilings. Steel allows you to avoid ceiling joists most of the time, and that gives a lot more headroom.


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greygoose
Auburn Fan
Member since Aug 2013
8703 posts
 Online 

quote:

Stick Built Workshop?
Exactly what I did about 14 years ago.


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dragginass
Member since Jan 2013
2421 posts

I stick built mine. I used standard height studs and built my own trusses. People use metal buildings because they are cheap, and go up fast.

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This post was edited on 7/4 at 9:11 am


bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

Thanks for all the input, I think I’m gonna price out a metal building against it. By the time I insulate and brick the front of a metal building I bet it’s very close to the same cost. You also wouldn’t have the same rot concerns you have with a pole barn. I think it’s a good idea


DownshiftAndFloorIt
LSU Fan
Here
Member since Jan 2011
62190 posts

Steel is just a better construction material.


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Obtuse1
Wofford Fan
Westside Bodymore Yo
Member since Sep 2016
18435 posts

quote:

Thanks for the input. Do you have trusses or you have posts to break up the span with a cieling?


Sorry for the late reply.

I used 6/12 common trusses set on 24" centers. Quick and "cheap". One thing to note if you order trusses check what is available in-stock vs built-to order. I adjusted one small dimension to use "stock" trusses and saved 65% on the trusses and got them in a couple of days vs several weeks. The dimension changed was having a few more inches of overhang so the square footage of the floor stayed the same but I paid a small amount more for soffit and shingles but nothing compared to what I saved.

I wanted a clear span for the full 30' width but you could definitely break it up but the cost would probably be more without using trusses all things added up and you lose utility in the space even if what you plan now isn't affected by them.

Again I was forced by HOA to go stick built but I actually saved money because once the framing and the roofing were done I took over myself. I did the man door, windows, Hardie board, electrical*, insulation, drywall, painting, built and installed the cabinets (once the shop was up and running), and installed the minisplit just paying a tech to verify the charge (the precharged unit was overcharged from the factory). I got away with not bricking it and just trimmed and painted it like the eaves on my house and matched the man and garage doors and windows to my house. Ultimately I think I like it better than if it had a brick veneer because it matches our pool house.

*The electrical saved me the most money vs running it in a metal building since my shop is very electrical heavy 16 240v circuits and 9 120v circuits along with inwall 3 phase from a rotary phase converter. Running all that in conduit would have been a huge time and money sink compared to just wiring it like a house.


bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

Man this sounds like exactly what I am wanting. 30’ clear span trusses, insulation, hardie board for most of the siding, drywall, mini split, and a ton of 240 outlets. Thanks for the input!


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Metariemobtiger
LSU Fan
Mobile
Member since Aug 2019
226 posts

I imagine cost is the biggest factor.

I bought a sawmill to offset that on my property.
Just finished up my 30x50 pole barn with a total cost so far of 500. (Screws and roof)
Bought some repurposed billboards for my roof until metal cost come way down.
Will start cutting for my same size shop in a week or so.

I say all this because if you’re handy and have the space , maybe buy a mill. I have 25k in mine but they can be had for under 20 .
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[url=https://postimg.cc/9w2R1sJS] [/url]


Jon A thon
Houston Astros Fan
Member since May 2019
798 posts

quote:

16 240v circuits


I have one 240 circuit in my garage and it's certainly a huge pain as I have three different 240 volt tools (table saw, band saw, and jointer). I need more. But 16! .

Jealous, while also trying to list out 16 tools that I'd need to require that......and that's probably how I'd approach it. Constantly looking for a new toy since I have the hookup .


LSUtigerME
LSU Fan
Walker, LA
Member since Oct 2012
3326 posts
 Online 

I just finished a 30x50 metal building on my property. One of the advantages of metal over stick built is both the strength and longevity. My building could flood and it wouldn’t be an issue for the building, along with little risk of rot on the materials.

16 240V circuits just seems incredibly excessive. Wire costs are high AF. Unless you have a 400A dedicated service and are running some type of industrial operation, you will never need 16 simultaneous circuits. I’ll probably have a few in my shop, figuring for a power tool, dust collection, and an AC or compressor as simultaneous loads. I can always add circuits if needed in the future.

There is certainly a point about being able to wire it like a house vs in conduit/flex. But, nothing stops you from sheeting the walls of a metal building and wiring it the same way.


cgrand
New Orleans Pelicans Fan
HAMMOND
Member since Oct 2009
32763 posts

pole frame (6x6 columns and filed-built beams on each column line)
pre-engineered wood trusses
wood girts
R-panel roof & sides


bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

I understand the rot concerns but if you don’t have posts under the ground and you sheathe it like a house, it’s no more likely to rot than any other house. Certainly posts in the ground are stronger and so is metal.


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bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
1457 posts

Man that is an awesome project. I’ve considered that as I have a zillion pine trees on my property. Very cool building


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Obtuse1
Wofford Fan
Westside Bodymore Yo
Member since Sep 2016
18435 posts

quote:

16 240V circuits just seems incredibly excessive.


First, you have to remember 240v circuits are not all created equal. Most of my 240 machines are hardwired with a local disconnect so they fall under different code requirements to begin with but setting that aside the circuit must be tailored to the amperage draw. You can't plug a NEMA 2-20P into a 6-30R or 6-50R physically and if you put a 6-50P on a machine that calls for a 2-20P the wiring is not protected to the machine. It doesn't matter of they are all being run simultaneously you have to protect the wire with the proper sized breaker. I have 240v machines that have running amp draws from 12 to 39.

I did the electrical when copper was much cheaper and did the work myself and believe in making things as future proof as possible and subscribe to the mantra buy once cry once.

240v circuits that can and do run simultaneously fairly often:

HVAC
2 different dust collectors one high volume and one high static pressure
RPC
2 50A plugs with a welder and my wife's glass slumping kiln on them
Aux heater for when the mini-split can't keep up

The various 240v machines include
2 table saws cabinet and slider
jointer
planer
4 bandsaws
wide belt sander
edge sander
2 shapers
lathe
multiple power feeders
CNC

As you can see even with 16 240v circuits they aren't all home runs several are wired to the same circuit but those are the least likely to run simultaneously and have required amperage capacity.

Most home shops don't have near the electrical requirements that mine does especially on the 240v and 3 phase side but I have been collecting and upgrading woodworking machines for 30 years. That being said I have been a member of Sawmill Creek and its predecessor for 18 years and have never heard anyone lament they put in too many circuits. Mine was excessive when I built it but it certainly isn't now. I am however not suggesting everyone building a shop needs a 200A load center completely full of breakers.


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