Posted by
Message
FearTheFish
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2007
2671 posts

Question about low tomato production
I have a raised garden and planted seeds directly in the soil about the 2nd week of April. The plants grew VERY well, but it took a while for them to bloom flowers.

I only got about 3 tomatoes before the heat kicked to > 90 degrees. I doubt any of the new flower buds will produce anything.

Two questions:

1) Since this was my first year doing tomatoes, what should I do differently next year to boost production? (e.g., start from seeds and transplant? Trim earlier?)

2) Instead of ripping the plans out after these 3 tomatoes finish growing, should I just leave the plants in the ground and see if they produce in the fall? They are heirloom tomatoes I got from a seed exchange - seem to be normal, big red tomatoes.


PillageUrVillage
LSU Fan
Mordor
Member since Mar 2011
9194 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
Start seeds in January and transplant mid to late March. After you are sure the last frost has passed. You definitely waited too late.

If you can keep the plants healthy, then I don’t see a reason not to just let them keep going until the fall. Got nothing to lose.
This post was edited on 7/9 at 7:56 pm


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
70
TheDrunkenTigah
Syracuse Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2011
15326 posts
 Online 

re: Question about low tomato production
First, you probably could have started the seeds earlier, but it’s likely not the only issue. I had a similar problems last year and this year got much better results.

First thing with tomatoes is they don’t need much nitrogen. Use a balanced fertilizer, and I added a little extra phosphorus at planting and during fruiting, just to make me feel better. Avoid overwatering, it rinses the fertilizer out prematurely and makes it hard to keep up.

Leave the plants if you want, if they look healthy then there’s not much reason to pull them. Good chance something will get them between now and fall though, so be prepared if you want a shot at a fall crop.


FearTheFish
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2007
2671 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
quote:

First thing with tomatoes is they don’t need much nitrogen. Use a balanced fertilizer, and I added a little extra phosphorus at planting and during fruiting, just to make me feel better.

Any suggestions? I used some of the Burpee vegetable fertilizer and it seemed to do well with my peppers and everything else.



CrawDude
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Apr 2019
576 posts

re: Question about low tomato production


Tbone2
Member since Jun 2015
23 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
Like the others said, you waited too late. I plant my seeds on 1/1. On Feb 15 I look at the long range forecast and if no 30's for a month I plant. I plant between 2/15 and 3/15, with 3/1 to 3/15 being the most common. I also start enough seeds where if I do get a killing frost I can replant. If I don't have to replant I give them away to people that insist on waiting until "After Easter" to plant.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
TD SponsorTD Fan
USA
Member since 2001
Thank you for supporting our sponsors
Advertisement
TheDrunkenTigah
Syracuse Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Aug 2011
15326 posts
 Online 

re: Question about low tomato production
That looks good, 3-6-4 is just about right and if it’s got some calcium on the label then even better. If not just need to supplement with a handful of garden gypsum at planting and every few weeks to prevent blossom end rot. Add epsom salt as well as a source of magnesium and sulfur. Containers become depleted with excess rain or watering, so the trick is learning to read the plants’ needs without over or under doing it. They should be growing around a foot a week at peak season but there should be just as many blossom stems as regular branches. This was the biggest difference I noticed, before I paid attention to my fertilizer there was a lot of leaf growth but not very many blossoms.


FearTheFish
LSU Fan
Member since Dec 2007
2671 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
quote:

3-6-4 is just about right and if it’s got some calcium on the label then even better.
If memory serves correct, it was about 3-5% calcium.

Thanks for the input everyone. Seems as though the fatal error was planting so late. This is the first year doing a full blown garden, so it's been trial by error for the most part.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
EveryoneGetsATrophy
LSU Fan
Member since Nov 2017
700 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
If you are in S. La, chances are that what ever is still on the plant will be splitting with the rain.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
DownSouthTiger
LSU Fan
downsouth
Member since Jan 2005
2336 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
The most common thing people do to hurt their crop is planting too late. I start the seeds 1st week of January and plant last week of Feb or 1st week of March.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
NATidefan
Alabama Fan
Two hours North of Birmingham
Member since Dec 2008
28983 posts

re: Question about low tomato production
Yep, like others said you have to start growing from seed in January. My grandfather used to start his whole garden in the spare bathtub right after new years day.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
first pageprev pagePage 1 of 1next pagelast page
refresh

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram