Posted by
Message
TigerFanatic99
Chicago Cubs Fan
South Bend, Indiana
Member since Jan 2007
12656 posts

Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
I'm in Northern Indiana, grass is a mix of Kentucky Bluegrass, Tall Fescue, a little of some rye, and a ton of shitty weeds I am working on killing off.

Before I bought the house about 5 years ago, the previous owner ripped the back yard up to put in a new septic system, and resodded it himself. The problem is he didn't care for it well at all, and every year now during the heat of the summer when we get a few weeks straight in the upper 80s and low 90s with meddling rain, it just completely dries out and dies off.

Installing irrigation is not an option right now. Short of moving a sprinkler around 5 times every day, is there anything I can do or put down to help if fare better during mid June through mid August with these grass types?


CrawDude
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Apr 2019
684 posts
 Online 

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
I’d suggest contacting the Indiana Cooperative Extension Service county extension agent in whatever county you side. Google contact info - it will be on their website. I’m sure they can provide you with suggestions/literature that might involve a different lawn grass. Those grasses can’t tolerate that temperature in the Deep South and die in summer.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
LSUEnvy
LSU Fan
Hou via Lake Chuck
Member since May 2011
9491 posts

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
I’m wondering if the previous owner stripped off a lot of topsoil in the process of the new septic install. He may have laid new sod on clay. As mentioned above contact county agency and see what they recommend. Many times they can analyze your soil.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
10
Decisions
LSU Fan
Member since Mar 2015
951 posts

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
Pull some soil samples to see what your fertility/soil type is for starters. If anything is bad out of whack (pH is usually the big killer) have it addressed. The more fertile the soil the stronger your plants will be and their ability to weather tough conditions.

Beyond that it’s rather difficult to INCREASE water retention (there are plenty of ways to decrease it). If your soil was too sandy/silty I suppose theoretically you could till it all up and have clay added to increase moisture retention, but that would be extreme. I really don’t recommend it.

A far easier solution would be (as the other guy said) to lay down more heat/drought tolerant grass.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
East Coast Band
Alabama Fan
Member since Nov 2010
38642 posts

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
Is your yard hilly, where the rain you get just runs off? Maybe not for northern Indiana is pretty flat. Perhaps you could plant some trees that would provide some shade,so the grass doesn't swelter in the direct sunlight.


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
Cracker
Montana Fan
in a box
Member since Nov 2009
9423 posts

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
Bluegrass loves and needs water a lot of water
You could at least get a separate meter for your irrigation where you don’t pay sewage on and hook your hose to that. Cut the grass as high as possible


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
notsince98
Missouri Fan
KC, MO
Member since Oct 2012
10610 posts

re: Increasing drought and heat tolerance (yard)
a soil conditioner will help the ground hold more water. It helps but probably not drastically.

Mowing higher is the first thing to do with Fescue/KBG. 3-3.5" is probably the sweet spot since you have KBG. Fescue likes 3-4" cutting height and KBG tends to like closer to 3".

You should be able to get by with watering deep once every 4-5 days. You may end up with the KBG going dormant but that is just fine. KBG is hardy and survives well.

Watering deep less often helps promote deeper root growth, especially in the fescue. The drying out between watering helps get oxygen down into the roots. You just have to make sure it doesnt dry out to below the root depth.

The KBG roots will probably stall out about 2" below ground. Fescue roots should get much deeper with proper watering patterns. I wouldn't worry about keeping the KBG green. It will go dormant and survive. Keeping the fescue/rye alive should be the focus, IMO.
This post was edited on 7/8 at 10:44 am


Replies (0)
Replies (0)
00
first pageprev pagePage 1 of 1next pagelast page
refresh

Back to top

logoFollow TigerDroppings for LSU Football News
Follow us on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram to get the latest updates on LSU Football and Recruiting.

FacebookTwitterInstagram