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DeoreDX
Member since Oct 2010
2983 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
I went with a cheap electric auger instead of a cheap gas. Worked just as good as a cheap gas one I borrowed in the past. I tend to trust the longevity of no name cheap electric tools more so than cheap gas tools. Just have to keep an eye out on the cord. I've used a tow behind before and they work great on flat yards. My new yard has some elevation change and hills so I wasn't sure how well a tow behind would work on ground like that.


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hjl0820
LSU Fan
Member since Aug 2017
14 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
Another thought, my first fence I did 8’ center post and 8’ stringers, when a hurricane came through it blew off random 8’ sections of fence. When I rebuilt I used 8’ center posts and I0’ stringers alternating the joint so they were not lined up, use metal plates to connect stringers where they meet, that way if post are not exact it does not matter.


MikeBRLA
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jun 2005
11803 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
quote:

I0’ stringers alternating the joint so they were not lined up, use metal plates to connect stringers where they meet, that way if post are not exact it does not matter.


I came here to post this to correct those who were talking about terminating all the stringers with the posts at exactly 8 feet. Your stringers should be staggered to make the fence stronger in high winds as you noted. But also staggering them will prevent the stringers from sagging as well.


fightin tigers
Downtown Prairieville
Member since Mar 2008
48868 posts
 Online 

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
I would do 16' boards rather than terminate in the middle of a run then. Besides looking bad you are putting the weak point in the middle unsupported.


MikeBRLA
LSU Fan
Baton Rouge
Member since Jun 2005
11803 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
quote:

would do 16' boards rather than terminate in the middle of a run then. Besides looking bad you are putting the weak point in the middle unsupported.


I agree. That would be ideal. Space your posts 7’ apart with 16’ stringers to allow for error.


fightin tigers
Downtown Prairieville
Member since Mar 2008
48868 posts
 Online 

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
I mean, it is a ridiculous thing to do to start, but if you believe it will help the extra money for 16' is negligible.


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SouthernInsanity
LSU Fan
Shadows of Death Valley
Member since Nov 2012
4621 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
For me it's easy.... I'm not fricking doing it, LOL. Don't have the time and don't have a method of hauling off the current fence. That and I'm replacing about 285' worth of it.


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trident
Tennessee Fan
Member since Jul 2007
3986 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
While the post hole digger may be more work, it won’t break your back like a auger will when it catches a root or some hard clay. Be careful with that thing.

Day 1- dog holes, cement posts in ground and let it sit
Day 2- put the runners up
Day 3- start adding boards. Run your line at the bottom to ensure you are not going to hit the ground when putting them up.


I see screws were suggested, but just as a caution, they will take 2x as long to put up and cost 2x as much. Nail gun is cheaper and easier.


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boudinman
Member since Nov 2019
767 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
Harbor Freight has an auger for around the same price as HD, and it has a larger engine. Select very good treated 4 inch square posts and set them straight, level and concreted in place. I'd then place up the fence boards and not worry about some being longer than others due to uneven ground. At the end I'd take a chalk box and pop a line across the top, and use a skil saw to cut them all level to same height.

I'd check on the price of cypress boards. If cypress is to expensive go with cedar over pine. A fence of treated lumber, cypress boards, and decking screws will last many years. Cypress doesn't rot. So you save on waterproofing/sealants.

LINK

LINK


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jeffsdad
Member since Mar 2007
11459 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
About all I can add is don't dig the fence into the ground at any point. If possible keep it from touching the ground. Obviously to avoid rot.


TAMU-93
Texas A&M Fan
Sachse, TX
Member since Oct 2012
360 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
Here's my 2 cents.

Wood rots when it gets wet. Wood posts eventually rot and snap at ground level. Digging up the concrete footing to replace a post is a huge pain in the ass. For that reason, I always use steel posts. It's worth the extra cost. I also use what they call a kick board or rot board, so you can get the pickets up off the ground and away from your weed eater.

Don't pick an arbitrary number for the distance between your posts. Pros put them every 8' because rails come in 8' lengths. Do some math. If you need 90' of fence, that's twelve 7.5' panels. 60' feet of fence is eight 7.5' panels.

If you have to rent and a nail gun and compressor, it is cheaper to use screws. People say ring shank nails wont back out, but they do. Screws wont.

A fence built out of cedar with steel posts, screws and a rot board will be exceptionally strong and last a very long time.


fightin tigers
Downtown Prairieville
Member since Mar 2008
48868 posts
 Online 

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
quote:

Don't pick an arbitrary number for the distance between your posts. Pros put them every 8' because rails come in 8' lengths.


As a former pro I will tell you lessons learned we ran at 7'10".


Metal poles will hold up. They look like shite though.
This post was edited on 2/12 at 10:31 pm


LSUDbrous90
LSU Fan
Lafayette
Member since Dec 2011
1031 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
quote:

Metal poles will hold up. They look like shite though.


Not if the metal poles face your neighbors.


humblepie
LSU Fan
Member since May 2008
331 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
Anyone have experience with something like this? Hidden metal posts


baldona
Auburn Fan
Florida
Member since Feb 2016
11368 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
I think you guys are way overthinking some of the stuff. Ring shank nails and wooden posts are fine. Repair in 5-10 years with a couple screws once or twice a year. Cheapest and easiest thing by far.

Even with screws, boards break and what not. You can't build a wooden fence that is maintenance free.


bigbuckdj
LSU Fan
Member since Sep 2011
931 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
I think the thing in question is the wooden posts. I do see a lot that are broken off at the ground level. Is there a secret for installing wooden posts and preventing that from happening?


fightin tigers
Downtown Prairieville
Member since Mar 2008
48868 posts
 Online 

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
Not really. You can pile up the concrete and it will help some, but it is the water/contact line.

There is no magic combination to get a fence to last forever. They are wood and deteriorate.


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Conner4real
LSU Fan
Earth
Member since Sep 2017
334 posts

re: How hard is it to DIY a wooden privacy fence?
1. Rent a one man auger with a torque pole. The two man stand alone auger will beat you to shite. You’ll also need a post hole digger to shave and clean out your post holes.
2. Get a few hundred feet of string and some wood stakes. Lay your fence line out with the string and pull it tight. Remember to go a foot or two past your lot line in the corners to give room to dig corner holes. The strings should intersect where the corner post goes.
3. Spray paint dots where your post holes will be dug. Standard is 8 feet apart, but I’d go 7’9 or so to account for the auger slipping either way.
4. Dig your holes 24” deep. This depth will consume about 1 eighty pound bag of Crete per hole and you’ll have rock solid posts.
5. Set your posts. Outside edge of each post barely touches the string. One man holds it there constantly checking with a level. Other man pours concrete in the hole. If you have a chainsaw, forget about getting exact height. You can hack the tops off later after you hang your frame 2x4’s. This will save a ton of time. If no chainsaw, set each to exact height.
6. Let concrete set up over night.
7. Mark each corner post at 12”, 40”, and 68”. Pull a tight string from one corner to the next at each of these three heights. Mark every post in between where the string is. You now have the height for all three frame boards at every post. This will give you a nice gradual slope that will match the slope of your yard. If your yard has any major sudden elevation changes, adjust accordingly.
8. Hang the frame. 3”+ ring shank nails work fine here. Cut any 2x4 overhang off with a skill saw. Make sure to leave enough room to butt the next 2x4 up to it where the end of each can be nailed to the same post. Don’t use the connector brackets. Your frame will warp and bend in no time. Nail both ends of every 2x4 to a post.
9. Cut the tops of your posts off with a chain saw an inch above your top frame board.
10. Time to hang fence boards. Hang one in each corner. Make sure they stick up equal heights above the top frame board. Pull a tight string from one corner to the other on top of the two fence boards. Now you have your height for that side. Hang each board at string height. 1.5” ring shank nails work fine. Screws are good but take longer. Don’t use smooth nails.
This post was edited on 2/14 at 1:34 am


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